The 2023 NGCRC’s 26th International Gang Specialist

Training Conference (July 31 - August 2, 2023):

Advance Curriculum and Course Offering Information  

 

 

            The full conference information is available at https://ngcrc.com/2023.conference.html

   

            Some of the training sessions are available now and up to the time frame of Aug. 2, 2023 at the Video-Based Gang Training Website: Https://ngcrc.com/videopage.html

 

            You get a password you will need for accessing the on-line video training sessions; you get the password in your “Confirmation of Conference Registration” letter when you register for the 2023 training program. Password expires 8-3-2023.


            Most sessions are “in-classroom” face-to-face in-person instruction types of training sessions that are taught on-site at the conference hotel on July 31 - Aug. 2, 2023 in Chicago. Some are available both in-person and on-line. Some are available only on-line.

             

            This advance listing shows that there are N = 99 sessions currently listed for the 2023 program. We are expecting to add more.

 

Last updated: January 27, 2023 




 

(1) “The NCIC Violent Person File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, CTAP/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV. 

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Victim, Witness, and Survivor Services.

            Special restriction: Sworn law enforcement and corrections ONLY.

            Abstract

            The Violent Person File or VPF is a NCIC file designed specifically for officer safety. The VPF contains information of individuals who have been convicted of a violent offense, felony or misdemeanor against any law enforcement officer. It also will identify individuals that have made credible threats of physical violence towards members of the criminal justice community. A positive response from the VPF will identify and alert law enforcement that the individual they are encountering may have the propensity for violence against law enforcement. The information can be retrieved from the NCIC system using a suspect’s name and date of birth, suspects known vehicle or driver’s license information. The VPF is automatically cross searched with every NCIC Wanted Person query.

            Bio

            Mr. Grant Smith is a member of the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) external training staff. Mr. Smith is a retired police officer with twenty-two years of law enforcement experience. For twelve of the twenty-two years, he was assigned to a multi-jurisdiction and multi-agency narcotics and violence crime task force as a task force agent and supervisor. Other law enforcement experience includes time in the Patrol Division, Investigations Division, and as a Special Response Team as a team leader. He also served as an investigator on the county’s Child Sexual Abuse Task Force. Additionally, he was a member of the department’s Counter Drug Reaction Team, and the department’s Police Honor Guard. Immediately upon retirement from the police department, Mr. Smith served as a member of a forensic team with the Combined Explosive Exploitation Cell (CEXC) in Baghdad, Iraq.

            As an FBI training instructor, Mr. Smith conducts training for municipal, county, state and federal agencies. He is also part of the FBI’s New Agent Training Team in Quantico, VA and participates in CJIS internal training. In 2015, Mr. Smith was the recipient of the Frederic Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Law Enforcement Training. Mr. Smith is a United States Navy Veteran.


(2) “RICO vs. One Off Indictments — Two Different Approaches to Combat Violent Gang Crime in Tennessee”, by P. Neal Oldham, Assistant United States Attorney, Western District of Tennessee, Memphis, TN; and Wendy K. Cornejo, Assistant United States Attorney, Western District of Tennessee, Memphis, TN.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis.

            Abstract

            This course is a case study of a gang prosecution of Vice Lords. Two Assistant United States Attorneys share their investigation and prosecution techniques used against the Vice Lords in West Tennessee. One AUSA prosecuted a group through a RICO and VICAR investigation and indictment. The other chose the “one off” method, indicting many members for any possible crime in various indictments. This class will show the method each AUSA used to investigate and prosecute their cases. It will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each method through an examination of the time spent in comparison to the sentences given. Which method prosecuted more Vice Lords? Which took more time to investigate? What would they do differently?

            Bios

            P. Neal Oldham has been a prosecutor for 18 years. He spent his first five years in rural Tennessee as an Assistant District Attorney. He then moved to the Shelby County DA’s office which prosecutes cases arising out of Memphis, TN, staying for eight and one-half years spending most time in the Gang Unit prosecuting gang homicides. While in the Shelby County DA’s Gang Unit he and other ADA’s along with local and federal law enforcement reconstituted the Shelby County Multi-Agency Gang Unit “MGU”. In 2018 he moved to the United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Tennessee where he is assigned to the Organized/Violence Groups Unit. He earned his Juris Doctor in 2004 from the Cecil Humphrey School of Law in Memphis, TN. He earned his Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of Memphis in 1999. He was the 2008 Tennessee District Attorney General’s Conference President’s Award Winner which recognizes the state prosecutor of the year. He is a member of the Tennessee State Bar.

            Wendy K. Cornejo is currently an Assistant United States Attorney at the United States Attorney’s Office in the Western District of Tennessee. Mrs. Cornejo is assigned to the Organized/Violent Groups Unit. From 2004 to 2018, she served as an Assistant State’s Attorney at the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office in Chicago, IL where she prosecuted all violent felonies which included murder, sex charges, and armed robberies. Mrs. Cornejo earned her Juris Doctor in 2003 from DePaul University College of Law in Chicago, IL. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Political Science in 1999 from Bradley University located in Peoria, IL. Mrs. Cornejo is a member of the Illinois State Bar.


(3) “Gang/STG Cryptanalysis: How to Break Gang Codes”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification; Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Gang Internet Investigation; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

            Abstract

            Cryptanalysis has a significant role to play in the investigation of gangs and STG’s because they often send printed or digital messages where the code contains information about future crimes. Prison gangs have done this for decades abusing the mail privileges they have by sending out coded messages to their contacts on the streets to carry out gang operations such as drug dealing outside of the prison. The presenter will provide a historical overview of an actual prison gang case where the gang used a sophisticated code and encryption system to send “orders” to the street operatives. The prison and regional authorities could not break the code. So they contacted the NGCRC. The presenter broke the code and it obviously meant a big break in the ongoing gang investigation. The presenter will show you how he broke the code. Attend this session to learn the various types of codebreaking attacks.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

 

(4) “The Use of Drones By Gangs To Smuggle Contraband into Correctional Institutions: Part 1 of 3”, by George Knox, Ph.D. and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Special Note: This session is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. It is technically ready to view and complete now, before the conference begins. You will automatically get a password for accessing the video training files once you register for the conference.

            Special note on required reading: please read before viewing this video consists of a document located at: https://ngcrc.com/dronepaper.pdf

            Abstract

            Gangs and STG’s have a long history in trying to control the smuggling of drugs and cell phones into prisons. The use of drones to smuggle contraband into correctional institutions began in earnest in 2013. That’s when four offenders were arrested in a drone smuggling incident at the Calhoun State Prison in Morgan, Georgia. This is a 3 part series of a narrated power point video presentation. Part 1 covers gang involvement with inmate economic rackets and smuggling contraband, and new FAA regulations. The problem of gangs/STG’s using drones and a detailed historical chronology of examples of prison drone smuggling is provided.

            Bios

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).


(5) “Chicago Gangs: Criminal Networks and Nexus to Cartel, Organized Crime, and Terror”, by Aaron Cunningham, Chicago Police Department (retired), Chicago, IL.

            Two (2) hours

            Note: This session is restricted to Law Enforcement.

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Homicide Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Domestic Counter-Terrorism; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract

            This presentation will provide an executive overview of Chicago’s criminal street gangs, factions, and the violent intermural competition over criminal enterprise. Case studies will illuminate gang nexus and network relationship to cartel, organized crimes, and public corruption.

            Bio

            Aaron Cunningham has (25) years of law enforcement experience and retired a 24-year veteran of the Chicago Police Department last assigned to CPIC Fusion Center, Bureau of Counter Terrorism & Special Operations. He is a highly decorated officer with extensive gang experience and past assignments to USATF PSN Task Force, Area Gun Team, Tactical Teams, District Intelligence Officer, and Patrol. His experience entailed joint activity with Federal, State, Local partner agencies, task force, and HIDTA/OCDEFT operations.

            Past performance also includes organization of large format platform-based training events to include the 1st and 2nd International Counter-Terrorism Conference (2012, 2013) for National-level components with intelligence, defense, and police agencies hosted by the Korean National Police Agency, South Korea. Aaron further led an officer survival project, Uso Tactico de la Fuerza y Supervivencia Policial, over (7) years for more than (950) members of El Salvador’s Policia Nacional Civil.


(6) “The National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Gang File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, CTAP/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits (the training tracks that the session gives credit for): Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Special restriction: Sworn law enforcement and corrections ONLY.

            Abstract 

            This session is an officer safety and investigative tool offered by the NCIC for all levels of law enforcement. It provides near instantaneous information about a suspect’s recorded gang affiliation, personal identifying information, and the officer caution indicators in relation to individual gang members. The NCIC Gang File can convey two categories of information, Gang Group Reference Capability (GRC) and Group Member Capability (GMC). This segment of training will focus on retrieving information from the Gang File with an emphasis on how it can be used for investigative purposes and officer safety. 

            Bio 

            Mr. Grant Smith is a member of the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) external training staff. Mr. Smith is a retired police officer with twenty-two years of law enforcement experience. For twelve of the twenty-two years, he was assigned to a multi-jurisdiction and multi-agency narcotics and violence crime task force as a task force agent and supervisor. Other law enforcement experience includes time in the Patrol Division, Investigations Division, and as a Special Response Team as a team leader. He also served as an investigator on the county’s Child Sexual Abuse Task Force. Additionally, he was a member of the department’s Counter Drug Reaction Team, and the department’s Police Honor Guard. Immediately upon retirement from the police department, Mr. Smith served as a member of a forensic team with the Combined Explosive Exploitation Cell (CEXC) in Baghdad, Iraq.  

            As an FBI training instructor, Mr. Smith conducts training for municipal, county, state and federal agencies. He is also part of the FBI’s New Agent Training Team in Quantico, VA and participates in CJIS internal training. In 2015, Mr. Smith was the recipient of the Frederic Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Law Enforcement Training. Mr. Smith is a United States Navy Veteran.


(7) The Graffiti Identity 1 - Understanding the Game", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media.

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            In today’s tight economy, the majority of police agencies are assigning graffiti vandalism investigations to their street gang or special investigations units. This session provides an introduction to graffiti art versus graffiti vandalism. In this session, participants will learn how to distinguish street gang graffiti from taggers’ graffiti, understand the basic graffiti tags and their variations, and the subcultural protocols that govern them. This session covers the various types of graffiti cultures, state laws (beyond reasonable doubt) and city codes (preponderance of the evidence) and the graffiti identity (name, formats, and styles). This is part one of a three part course sequence.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(8) “Gangs and Gang Violence in Britain”, by Janice Joseph, Ph.D., Criminal Justice Program, Stockton University, Pomona, New Jersey.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Domestic Counter-Terrorism; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            The number of gangs in Britain has increased tremendously over the years. Today, there are several criminal gangs in Britain including the Yardies, Nigerian gangs, Asian gangs, and Muslim gangs. The presence of these gangs has caused a tremendous increase in violence. This presentation examines the nature and extent of gang violence in Britain and attempts to control it.

            Bio

            Janice Joseph, Ph.D. is a professor of the Criminal Justice Program at Stockton University. She is the Editor for Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice. She earned her Ph.D. degree from York University in Toronto, Canada. She is the author of the book: Black Youths, Delinquency, and Juvenile Justice; and she co-edited the book With Justice for All: Minorities and Women in Criminal Justice; and she has published numerous articles on delinquency, gangs, violence against women, and minorities and crime. She has earned a Frederic Thrasher Award for her research on gangs and has successfully completed several gang specialist training programs at the National Gang Crime Research Center. She was elected to be the president of the World Society of Victimology (WSV) and gives her presidential speech during the 17th International Symposium of the WSV being held in San Sebastian, Spain in June, 2023.


(9) “Identifying Hybrid Gang Operations Inside a County Jail: A Look into the Investigation and Prosecution”, by Deputy Joe Polan, Gang Intelligence Unit, Oakland County Sheriff’s Office, Pontiac, MI; and Deputy Joe Kajy, Gang Intelligence Unit, Oakland County Sheriff’s Office, Pontiac, MI.

            Two (2) hours

            Restricted: Law Enforcement, Sworn Corrections, and Prosecutors only.

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on the entire criminal investigative process, from start to finish, within a correctional facility as well as the prosecution of hybrid gang members inside a county jail. Some of the topics discussed will be tactics used by the inmates to manipulate jail communications systems, investigative tools used by investigators to obtain prosecution and how to change the course and focus during an investigation based on information given. We will also discuss how to identify a hybrid gang’s existence inside a county correctional facility. The uniqueness of a hybrid jail gang in terms of their means, motivations, volatility and how the COVID Pandemic was a contributing factor to the creation of hybrid gangs within a county jail will be covered as well.

            Bios

            Deputy Joe Polan has seventeen years of law enforcement investigative experience in two different states. He started his career in the State of Florida with the City of Fort Lauderdale Police Department where he worked for 10 ½ years. Deputy Polan for the past six and a half years has been employed with the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office in the State of Michigan where he is assigned to the Gang Intelligence Unit. Deputy Polan has received over fifty agency and public commendations along with being the recipient of the Employee of the Month and Employee of the Year for outstanding work performance.

            Deputy Joe Kajy has three years of law enforcement investigative experience with the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office in Michigan where he is assigned to the Gang Intelligence Unit. Prior to that, he has a combined eleven years of experience in network administration, management of information systems and open-source intelligence. Being a fresh technical face in law enforcement, he has been the recipient of three awards during his career. Specializing in open-source intelligence gathering and internet investigations, he strives to provide streamlined methods for gathering information in criminal investigations.


(10) “Cultivating Confidential Informants (CI’s) Without the Proffer”, by Keiron McConnell, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Faculty of Arts, Professor of Criminology, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada; Sgt. Raj Jaswal, Vancouver Police Department, Vancouver, CANADA; Christopher M. Felton, MS, Fort Wayne Police Department, Fort Wayne, IN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            Attend this session to learn about the differences and commonalities inside law enforcement gang investigations with experts from both the U.S. and Canada. Chris is a USA based officer and this session builds upon his work on developing confidential informants (CI’s) in those situations or conditions when we are not in a position to offer the confidential informant a formal proffer. Attend this session to gain insights into how to develop more effective CI’s in gang crime investigation.

            Bios

            Keiron holds a Doctorate Degree in Policing, Security and Community Safety from Metropolitan London University, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement come with 29 years of operational experience with the last 15 years exclusively in gang suppression with a variety of police gang units. Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is a faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University where he teaches Organized Crime. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”.

            Sergeant Raj Jaswal has worked within the criminal justice system for the last 15 years in a frontline and investigative capacity as a member of the Vancouver Police Department. Raj has extensive experience in intelligence gathering along with gang enforcement, intervention and suppression. In 2014, he was recognized for his work with a Deputy Chief Constable commendation for developing strategies to curb gang violence in South Vancouver. In 2021, he was recognized for his superior accomplishments in gang investigations by the National Gang Crime Research Center in Chicago, Illinois, with the Frederick Milton Thrasher Award. In 2022, he was recognized for demonstrating outstanding professionalism and profound dedication to the safety of the communities he serves by the Ontario Gang Investigators Association with the Jim Aspiotis Memorial Award. Raj is part of a select cadre of Police Officers across Canada who are certified instructors in criminal vehicle interdiction training. Raj provides training and education to Canadian law enforcement o current and emerging trends related to the “travelling criminal”. Raj is also a recognized instructor for the U.S. Drug Interdiction Assistance Program that trains and educates law enforcement officers across the United States. Raj has a genuine passion for combining his practical experiences with his educational training. Raj serves as a guest lecturer for post-secondary criminology departments. Raj’s dedication to his community has resulted in him being the recipient of community service awards from within the City of Vancouver for his commitment to the communities he has worked in.

            Christopher M. Felton, MS is a detective sergeant from the Fort Wayne (IN) Police Department’s Gang and Violent Crimes Unit. Additionally, Det. Sgt. Felton is the team coordinator for the department’s Peer Support/Critical Incident Stress Management Team, represents the department on the Indiana Statewide CISM Team Network, and is a member of the Northeast Indiana Critical Incident Stress Management Team. Det. Sgt. Felton holds two master’s degrees (A Master of Science in Criminal Justice with a concentration on Forensic Psychology and a Master of Philosophy) and is a Ph.D. candidate currently writing his dissertation for his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice - Law and Public Policy. Det. Sgt. Felton is also an adjunct professor at two local universities where he teaches courses revolving around forensic psychology, and teaches police mental health to police officers.


(11) “Psychopathy, Gangs, and Criminal Justice”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England.

            One (1) hour

            Special note: will be classroom session taught only on a Monday or Tuesday slot.

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prosecution; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            The relationship between psychopathy (narcissistic and antisocial traits) and long-term gang membership has been established by a several academic papers. At the sam time researchers have turned their attention to understanding the relationship between psychopathy and elements of law enforcement. This presentation will give an overview of psychopathy before exploring its relationship to gang membership. It will also consider how to manage individuals who present narcissistic and/or antisocial traits.

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Psychologist and Research Scientist at the Texas Juvenile Crime Prevention Center at Prairie View A&M University. She has an Mphil in Criminological Research (University of Cambridge, England) and an M.S.c. in Investigative Psychology (University of Huddersfield, England). Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. She was a recipient of a Frederick Milton Thrasher Award in 2017 for superior accomplishments in gang research and in 2020 for superior accomplishments in gang training.



(12) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 1 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Note: This is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. Available for viewing now.

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: special housing for informants; racial conflicts and race relations; contraband cell phones; overcrowding and stress and trauma on the job; suicide problems by inmates and staff; the “VID” factor and PTSD; exposure to trauma and stress on the job; increased radicalization of inmates; religious extremism; gang/STG abuse of religious worship; review of the largest white racist extremist gangs; Islamic gangs and gangs that seek to control religious services; the concept of gang density and its three measurement components; gang recruitment behind bars; inmate complaints about gang recruitment; extent of recruitment in prisons today.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


(13) “Comparison of Prison Gangs in the U.S. with Other Prison Gangs Around the Globe”, by Mitchel P. Roth, Ph.D., Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Sam Houston State University, Houston, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs.

            Abstract

            This session will look at prison gangs and their development from a perspective of American exceptionalism. It will cover the race-based nature of most American prison gangs over the years, focusing on White Nationalist/Supremacist gangs, Hispanic gangs, Native American gangs, and will look at their evolution over the past decades. Once the foundation of most modern American prison gangs is established, the session will compare inmate governance and inmate-staff relations in other prison systems to that of the United States. It will also compare the evolution of gangs in other countries with that of the United States.

            Bio

            Mitchel P. Roth, Ph.D. is Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Sam Houston State University. His areas of interest include global organized crime and gangs, history of crime and punishment, mass murder and serial homicide. His many books include, Power on the Inside: A Global History of Prison Gangs (2020), Fire in the Big House: The Worst Prison Disaster in American History (2019), The Illicit Economy in Turkey (with Mahmut Cengiz)(2019), An Eye for An Eye: A Global History of Crime and Punishment (2015) and Convict Cowboys: The Untold History of the Texas Prison Rodeo (2016). His books have been translated into Chinese, Persian, Croatian and Turkish. He has been an instructor at the Zhejiang Police College from 2009 to 2019 and at the International Law Enforcement Academy (Roswell) from 2001-2009. In 2020, Dr. Roth was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Excellence in Gang Research.


(14) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 2 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Note: This is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — available to view now through the VIDEOPAGE.

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: measuring the three aspects of gang density; how gang importation is added with joining inside; extent to which prisons report white inmates have a separate gang; names of the largest gangs in American prisons; the prevalence of reports of military trained gang members; names of the largest motorcycle gangs behind bars; reports of gang leaders influencing politicians; pressure to play down the gang problem; political corruption over time: 1994 to present; whether gangs that exist inside operate by the same name outside of prison; comparing street gangs and prison gangs; the extent to which gangs/STGs cause management problems; the problem of housing all members of one gang together.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


(15) “Introduction to Gangs and Deviant Groups”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Note: This course will be taught only on Monday, July 31st.

            Session Credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract 

            Considering everything from a fraternity to a church group, it is better to be in than out. Animals and human beings alike are social and influenced by group norms, values, and activities. From the outside looking in, mainstream America frequently questions why our youth are drawn to gangs and criminal behavior.

            This presentation is designed to develop a fundamental knowledge of the origins, development, and continued prosperity of gangs and deviant subcultures. Attendees will receive a broad overview of the major gang influences in today’s culture and why gangs, despite our best efforts, continue to adapt and evolve while maintaining surprising influences on our youth and adults. This introduction to gangs will serve as a foundation of knowledge upon which additional presentations at the National Gang Crime Research Center will expand.

Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 20 years. He also serves as the Acting President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for over 25 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs, teaches college courses and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(16) “Gang Mapping 101: An Introduction ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            Two (2) Hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Crime Analysis, Mapping, and Digital Forensics; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            This class is part 1 of a 2 part series. It serves as a starting point for understanding crime analysis, specifically, analytical mapping techniques as applied to gangs. Topics covered in this class: the evolution of crime analysis and mapping from the 1800s to present; intelligence levels, divisions, and processes; and the roles and responsibilities of analysts, administrators, and police officers. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).


(17) “Human Trafficking in the Gang World: The Challenges of Investigating, Building, and Indicting”, by Michael Tabarrok, Assistant Attorney General 3, Office of the Attorney General Chris Carr, Prosecution Division, Gangs, Atlanta, GA.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Victim, Witness, and Survivor Services.

            Abstract

            As gangs branch more into alternative profit schemes, human trafficking is a common method. The challenges of identifying, investigating, and building towards indictments are explored in detail based upon the Georgia Attorney General’s Gang Prosecution Unit and the Human Trafficking Unit case work together.

            Bio

            Michael Tabarrok is the Assistant Attorney General 3, Office of Attorney General Chris Barr, Prosecution Division, Gangs, Atlanta, Georgia. Having been a prosecutor for 24 years around the State of Georgia and Guam, (with a brief stint as a criminal defense attorney in the middle of his career for 3 years), he specializes in the prosecution of gangs, murders, and drugs, as well as asset forfeitures and special prosecutions. Using RICO, gang statutes, forfeitures, and Federal referrals, he brings novel approaches to attacking gang problems.


(18) “Hybrid Gangs: How They Evolve and Develop, Proper Identification and Documentation”, by Detective Danny Polo, Broward County Sheriff’s Office, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

            Three (3) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Internet Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification Skills; Gangs and the Mass Media.

            Abstract

            This course will dive into a recent case study about several hybrid gang investigations which led to over 200 arrests, 40 RICO indictments, seizures: 40kg cocaine, 20kg heroin/fentanyl, thousands of pills, 70 firearms, houses, cars, boats, $2 million+ cash, $1.5 million gold/jewelry, $1 billion in precious gems. This investigation tracked the activities of 3 major hybrid gangs operating in the north end of Broward County. During this investigation detectives constantly monitored the evolution of these hybrid gangs as some became more structured obtaining international money laundering and cartel connections while others suffered retribution and extinction due to the success and violence of the larger gangs. The investigation culminated with the lead defendant in the RICO fleeing to Mexico and subsequently surrendering after being kidnapped and extorted by Mexican State Police for over $300,000. Mexican sources of supply were identified and are being targeted by Federal Counter Parts.

            Bio

            Bachelor’s degree Psychology. Law enforcement for 30 years. Detective 2016-present, Broward County units in chronological order) Tactical Deployment, Crime Suppression, Organized Crime, Gang Investigations. Task Force Officer, United States Drug Enforcement Administration, and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms and Explosives. Advanced Gang Specialist with the Florida Gang Investigators Association, hundreds of hours of training in criminal gangs, organized crime, and money laundering. Presenter at the 2019 Attorney General’s FCPT program. Presenter at Broward College Institute of Public Safety, trained State Attorney’s Office prosecutors in Career Criminal and 10-20-life Units. Received the Florida Gang Investigators Association Investigator of the Year Award, and DEA Miami Field Division Task Force Officer Award for local impact. Testified in a Bloods gang member attempt murder trial as a Subject Matter Expert and got conviction for Gang Enhancement proving the crime was committed in furtherance of the gang. Selected as Subject Matter Expert on high profile rapper and bloods gang member Jarnell Demons “YNW MELLY” double homicide trial.


(19) “The Link Between Childhood Trauma and Gang Membership: Developing Intervention Service Components”, by Martha Wall-Whitfield, Ph.D., Principal, Arkansas Juvenile Assessment and Treatment Center, Bryant, AR.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Counseling Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            In this interactive session, participants will explore gang membership through a trauma-informed lens. Brain research on trauma will be presented as well as practical “do’s and don’ts” when dealing with students from trauma. Participants will learn what a trauma informed school and a trauma informed classroom look like. All of this information will then be directly linked to teaching gang-involved students in schools.

            Bio

            Dr. Martha Wall-Whitfield is an educator from Little Rock, Arkansas where she is currently the Principal at the state’s largest juvenile facility for incarcerated youth. During her time in Arkansas, she also has been the District Principal for Rite of Passage, overseeing all correctional education in the state. She taught for six years at the University level as an Assistant Professor for Averett University. She currently serves as an Adjunct for Arkansas State University, teaching in the school leadership program. Dr. Whitfield is a mom of five and a Mimi to three. She has been active in both her church as a Sunday School teacher and the community as a foster parent and foster parent trainer for the state.


(20) “Prosecuting MS-13 Leaders for Transnational Terrorism Offenses? The Ranfla Nacional and ‘Blue’ Federal Prosecutions as a Paradigm Shift in the Federal Government”, by Stephen L. Nelson, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah; Stewart M. Young, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Gangs and Organized Crime; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills.

            Abstract

            In the summer of 2020, President Trump announced a large takedown of MS-13 gang members in a nationwide federal-state investigation. Along with the usual charges for MS-13 members, he announced the first terrorism-related charges against an MS-13 leader in the United States. The terrorism prosecution of Armando Eliu Melgar Diaz, aka “Blue”, signified an administration shift towards larger scale investigation and prosecution of MS-13 on an international scale. In January 2021, with the subsequent investigation and prosecution of the Ranfla Nacional, the board of directors of MS-13 residing in El Salvador and Mexico, the Department of Justice (DOJ) fully embraced that administration shift towards using terrorism charges against the MS-13 organization. AUSAs Steve Nelson and Stew Young will discuss this new tactic by the DOJ, using publicly available resources to illuminate the prosecution of MS-13 leaders for terrorist offenses both extraterrorially and within the United States. This presentation will further expound on the potential uses of these charges for other violent street gangs that have an international presence, including 18th Street.

            Bios

            Steve Nelson is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as the Anti-Gang Coordinator for the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He earned his J.D. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Utah and serves as an Associate Instructor of Political Science at the University of Utah, and has taught over 2,000 undergraduate and graduate students in his teaching career. 

            Stewart M. Young is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as Senior Litigation Counsel for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He previously served in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of California. He earned his J.D. from Stanford University, clerked for judges on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and the Federal District Court for the District of Utah, and was a full-time faculty member at the University of Wyoming College of Law.


(21) “Tactical Interviewing: Interviewing the Criminal Mind”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. 

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Traditional interviewing and communication protocols are commonly successful with those who do not frequent criminal circles. However, when dealing with “experienced criminal gangsters,” they are well prepared to elude even the best interviewer/interrogator. Whether you are a mental health professional, an educator, intelligence analyst, or a law enforcement officer, being up-to-date on how to conduct an interview with the most savvy of criminally minded is the most essential tool.

            This seminar is intended to explore the concept of Tactical Interviewing (TI). TI is a concept being developed and researched by the National Gang Crime Research Center to better aide those who deal directly with the criminally savvy gangster. Tactical Interviewing involves an exploration in Forensic Psychology, Criminal Profiling, and Lie Detection that are combined to illustrate the taxonomies most commonly seen of a liar. With a better understanding of how the criminal mind works and how they develop their lies, you are better equipped to confront them successfully and more productively.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 20 years. He also serves as the Acting President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for over 25 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs, teaches college courses and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(22) “Gang Expert Testimony: Bringing Your Gang Investigation into Court”, by Tyler Sutherland, Gang Suppression Unit, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI; and Jim Bailey, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI.

            Three (3) hours

            Both a classroom session and an on-line session. Note: Available now at the NGCRC videotraining page.

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Homicide Investigation.

            Abstract

            How court room testimony and gang evidence will reduce crime rates. What to say and present as a gang expert in court. How to apply your state statute of an enhanced gang crime to the evidence in your gang case. How the stored gang intelligence becomes useful in the court room. How the prosecutor and gang investigator get a case ready for courtroom prosecution.

            Bios

            Detective Tyler Sutherland has been a police officer for the Battle Creek Police Department for over 13 years. He is currently assigned to the Battle Creek Police Detective Bureau, and was previously assigned to the Gang Suppression Unit for over 6 years. As a member of the Gang Unit, Detective Sutherland was directly involved as the lead investigator in a number of gang, and violent crime, cases that resulted in courtroom trials and jury convictions. While participating in all aspects of gang investigations and court room prosecution, Detective Sutherland has been qualified as, and testified as, a gang expert in the U.S. District court and Michigan State Circuit and District Court, more than 15 times in the last five years. One of these gang cases, was the first criminal gang enhancement jury conviction in the State of Michigan since the state statute was created. He is also recognized in circuit and district court as an expert in Drug Trafficking and Drug Investigations. A Defensive Tactics Instructor, and Patrol Training Officer, he has also received Instructor certification for Active Shooter Response for Civilians, through the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center at Texas State University.

            Corporal Jim Bailey has been with the Battle Creek Police Department for over 13 years, and has been assigned to the Battle Creek Police Department Gang Suppression Unit for over 6 years. Corporal Bailey has been directly involved in many of the same gang investigations as Detective Sutherland, and has assisted as one of the lead investigators with Detective Sutherland, on many of the same violence crime investigations. Corporal Bailey has also been involved in cell phone investigations, writing and executing search warrants, surveillance techniques, undercover drug buys, and managing confidential informants. Corporal Bailey has been recognized in Michigan State District Court and Circuit Court as an expert in drug trafficking and drug investigations, identifying armed subjects, and cell phone site analyses. Corporal Bailey is currently a K-9 handler for the Battle Creek Police Department and is a member of the department’s Emergency Response Team. He is a Defensive Tactics Instructor and a Patrol Training Officer for the Battle Creek Police Department. He has also received Instructor certification for Active Shooter Response for Civilians, through the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center at Texas State University.


(23) “Gangs, Guns and Drugs in Canada”, by Keiron McConnell, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Faculty of Arts, Professor of Criminology, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            In this presentation the audience will learn about the structure of policing in Canada and the impact this has on Gangs, Guns, and Drugs. This presentation will include a discussion on the impact that Canada has in its law enforcement and policies on the U.S. with a focus on the importation of marijuana into the U.S. and the exportation of guns and cocaine into Canada from the U.S.

            Bio

            Keiron holds a Doctorate Degree in Policing, Security and Community Safety from Metropolitan London University, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement come with 29 years of operational experience with the last 15 years exclusively in gang suppression with a variety of police gang units. Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is a faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University where he teaches Organized Crime. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”.


(24) The Graffiti Identity 2 - Prolific Writers & Crews", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to recognize their presence and how to extract criminal and research intelligence through the graffiti they generate. Reinforcement of the graffiti identity (name, format, and style). This is part two of a three part course sequence.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(25) “Operant Conditioning: A Path to Gang Violence”, by Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Municipal Courts, City Marshall Division, Fort Worth, TX.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract 

            This session will explore the effect of intentional and accidental operant conditioning on the predictability of violent behavior. It will discuss how operant conditioning influences gang violence and mass murders. Intentional operant conditioning as a way of grooming new gang members as well as the “accidental operant conditioning” i.e., violent media, which predisposes individuals, including gang members, to violent behavior will be explored. This session concludes with a discussion about approaches that can be used to “repair” the effects of violent operant conditioning.

            Bio

            Mr. Swift, Ph.D. is a husband, father, and a 22-year law enforcement veteran. Since April of 2018, Mr. Swift has served as the Fort Worth City Marshal. Prior to becoming the City Marshal, Mr. Swift rose to the rank of Captain in the Denver Sheriff Department. During his law enforcement career he served as a City Marshal, Director of Security, Watch Commander, FTO Commander, Gang/Intelligence Unit Commander, K-9 Unit Commander, Internal Affairs Bureau Investigator, Conduct Review Office Sergeant, Emergency Response Unit member and Sergeant, Court Services Sergeant, and as Adjunct Training Academy Instructor. Mr. Swift holds a MS and Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology from Walden University and has also received dual MBA’s and a BS in Criminal Justice from American International University. Mr. Swift is a published author (Gangs, Outlaw Bikers, Organized Crime & Extremists; Looseleaf Law Publishing), a contributor to Inside Police Psychology: policepsychologyblog.com, and is frequently asked to speak locally and nationally on topics related to gang, criminal, inmate, and law enforcement culture, forensic psychology, and jail gang investigations.


(26) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 3 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Note: This is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — available for viewing now through the VIDEOPAGE.

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: gang/STG member control of inmate economic rackets; cash seized from gang inmates; stronger gang affiliation after serving time; STG’s smuggle in contraband cell phones, make more improvised weapons; extent of formal gang training for prison staff today; threats and assaults against staff from prison gang members; the 2015 New York correctional union protest billboard portends the future — more protest billboards; whether inmate classification systems take gang membership into account; gangs extort money from inmate workers; whether Islamic inmates have separate gangs; are gang members more lawsuit oriented than non-gang members; the three types of prison riots; best estimate for latent terrorists; who wants tougher laws and zero-tolerance; the scarcity of gang renouncement programs; could improving race relations help reduce gang violence in prison; what support exists for no human contact status; large support exists for telephone and mail monitoring.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.

            

(27) “The Impact of Historical/Generational Trauma on Gang and Law Enforcement Interactions”, by Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Municipal Courts, City Marshall Division, Fort Worth, TX.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            This session focuses on the reality of historical/generational trauma and how it affects communities, cultures, groups, and the development of cognitive schemes. Historical examples of historical/generational trauma among minority groups is used to depict the less recognized concept of historical/generational trauma among law enforcement agencies and gangs. The impact of this form of trauma on the initial interactions of law enforcement officers and gang members is used to demonstrate how and why many interactions between law enforcement officers and gang members affect the success and failure of gang prevention, intervention, and interdiction programs. This training concludes with a discussion of the tactics and skills that attendees can use to improve the effectiveness of prevention, intervention, and interdiction efforts. 

            Bio

            Mr. Swift, Ph.D. is a husband, father, and a 22-year law enforcement veteran. Since April of 2018, Mr. Swift has served as the Fort Worth City Marshal. Prior to becoming the City Marshal, Mr. Swift rose to the rank of Captain in the Denver Sheriff Department. During his law enforcement career he served as a City Marshal, Director of Security, Watch Commander, FTO Commander, Gang/Intelligence Unit Commander, K-9 Unit Commander, Internal Affairs Bureau Investigator, Conduct Review Office Sergeant, Emergency Response Unit member and Sergeant, Court Services Sergeant, and as Adjunct Training Academy Instructor. Mr. Swift holds a MS and Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology from Walden University and has also received dual MBA’s and a BS in Criminal Justice from American International University. Mr. Swift is a published author (Gangs, Outlaw Bikers, Organized Crime & Extremists; Looseleaf Law Publishing), a contributor to Inside Police Psychology: policepsychologyblog.com, and is frequently asked to speak locally and nationally on topics related to gang, criminal, inmate, and law enforcement culture, forensic psychology, and jail gang investigations.

 

(28) “Protecting Health Care Facilities From Gang Violence”, by Keiron McConnell, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Faculty of Arts, Professor of Criminology, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Prevention Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This session will explore the challenges of dealing with the situation where members from rival gangs erupt into gang conflict and violence in a health care facility, more often than not an emergency room at a trauma hospital. There is also the matter of managing staff and visitors to the same building or area within the health care facility who may have gang ties. If they are all in the same treatment area and representing rival gang factions, then their conflict may erupt into violence even in a waiting room. Attendees in this session will learn about specific protocols of hospital lockdowns and other measures that can be put into place to de-escalate and prevent further gang violence. 

            Bio

            Keiron holds a Doctorate Degree in Policing, Security and Community Safety from Metropolitan London University, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement come with 29 years of operational experience with the last 15 years exclusively in gang suppression with a variety of police gang units. Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is a faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University where he teaches Organized Crime. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”.

                          

(29) “Reducing Gang-Related Violence in Correctional Institutions”, by Elvis Slaughter, MSCJ, Retired Sheriff’s Superintendent, former fire and police commissioner, criminologist, and author of ten books, including Safer Jail and Prison Matters: Effective Ways to Manage and Reduce Violence in Correctional Facilities.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing with Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators.

            Abstract

            The information that officers do or do not have usually determines their efficiency in dealing with everyday issues in their lives and in their professions. This session provides career law enforcement officers and correctional agencies with effective answers to the challenging gang violence that correctional institutions face daily. It provides distilled information designed to assist correctional institutions and law enforcement agencies in improving their leadership and management skills and preventing gang violence. This session is for everyone in criminal justice, including corrections, police, probation, parole, college students, professors, and the officer who wants to be a game changer and stay on top of their game.

            Bio 

            Criminologist Elvis Slaughter served as a fire and police commissioner, and is a retired Cook County Sheriff’s Superintendent with more than thirty years’ experience in criminal justice, corrections, and law enforcement. Slaughter holds a Master’s in Criminal Justice and Corrections. He has authored several articles and ten books, which include Safer Jail and Prison Matters, Mentally Ill Inmates and Corrections, and Preschool to Prison. Elvis is a speaker, security consultant, and correctional auditor. He is also a member of the American Jail Association, American Correctional Association, Hammond Police Citizen Advisory Commission, National Sheriff’s Association, Illinois Sheriff’s Association, and former president of he Illinois Academy of Criminology. Elvis taught criminal justice at the college level.


(30) “An Introduction to Understanding Prison Gangs”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            It has been stated over and over again that those who control the prisons, control the streets. Prison gangs remain a serious threat to personal safety through their intricate work while incarcerated as well as their connections and counterparts on the streets. This presentation will provide a visual tour of prison/street gang tattoos, group photographs, and confiscated material, providing key intelligence to law enforcement, educators, researchers, and correctional staff. Also included is a basic introduction to prison gang identification and gang activity in prison. A brief investigation into the criminal personality and profile that underlies gang existence and activities will be included. By focusing on the major prison gangs influencing our correctional institutions today, it is intended that the participant will have a fundamental understanding of prison gangs, their activities in prison, and reasons for their existence.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 20 years. He also serves as the Acting President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for over 25 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs, teaches college courses and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(31) “The Christian Gang Specialist Reception”, by Dr. Ternae T. Jordan, Sr., Lead Pastor, Mount Canaan Baptist Church, Chattanooga, TN; and NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour

Note: this is scheduled for Tuesday, August 1, 2023, noon.

            Session credits: Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

Abstract

            This is available only to persons registered for the conference. This will be held during the “lunch hour” (12pm - 1pm) on Tuesday, August 1st, 2023. If you answered "YES" to the question on your registration form "I am interested in networking with Christian gang specialists while at this conference", then you receive a special TICKET inside your registration materials. If you answered "NO" or left the question blank, it was assumed you are not interested. If you would like to change your mind, then you must do so prior to showing up at the conference: you can do it simply by mailing the NGCRC Conference Processing Center a letter or memo to the effect “if I was listed as NO or BLANK for the Christian Gang Specialist Reception, I wish to modify my registration data to reflect the new code of YES for attending this gang specialist networking event”. As we need to plan on how many are attending, no "walk ins" will be allowed. And as is the NGCRC tradition, of course, there are "door prizes" at this reception. Come prepared for some amazing testimony. This is open to anyone for any certification or non-certification registration, you need not be signed up for the Faith Based Programs certification option to attend this session, but you do need to sign up for it in advance. We have been doing the Christian Reception since 1997. It is part of the strong positive tradition of the NGCRC to provide unique training and networking opportunities to those who attend the NGCRC training conference.

            Bio

            Dr. Ternae Jordan is a highly respected leader and inspirational speaker. He is one of the world’s leaders in spiritual enlightenment, community engagement, and leadership. He is a pastor, mentor, father, and a worldwide transformational and inspirational speaker. For more than 40 years, Dr. Jordan created and shaped community and national initiatives. He is known for his passion and enthusiastic style of delivery and his ability to connect and translate his skills and knowledge into transformational ideas. His passion for serving God and compassion for reaching people extends far and wide. In 1992, he created the award-winning Stop the Madness program. He has received numerous awards, recognitions, and honors including the Jefferson Award from the American Institute for Public Service recognizing him for outstanding public service. Indiana Governor Joseph E. Kernan awarded him the Sagamore of the Wabash Award, the highest honor bestowed on a citizen in the State of Indiana. The word “Sagamore” was a leadership word used by American Indian tribes to describe a great person among the tribe to whom the existing chief would consult for wisdom and advice. Sagamore also means “respected chief” and first appeared in reference to Chingachgook in the classic book The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper.

            The co-host of the 2023 NGCRC Christian Gang Specialist Reception is George Knox (NGCRC staff). The format this year will be a sandwich luncheon format with the opportunity to give testimony, door prizes, etc.

(32) Online Resources - Communication & Search Tools”, by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn the purpose of Google-alerts and E-groups and how to activate them for gang research and investigative purposes. The instructor will demonstrate how to use them for purposes of gang research and for investigative assignments as a graffiti and gang specialist.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(33) “Federal Gang Prosecution in a Post-First Step Act World: Discussing the Impact of Federal Criminal Justice Reform as it Relates to Gang Members”, by Stephen L. Nelson, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah; Stewart M. Young, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract

            The First Step Act, signed into law on December 21, 2018, makes significant changes to federal criminal laws relevant to gang members, specifically mandatory minimum sentencing provisions in narcotics cases. In this session, attendees will learn about the First Step Act, the changes made by the first step act, and how these changes will affect federal gang prosecutions moving forward. Attendees will learn about how to identify and evaluate (in light of the First Step Act) potential gang-related defendants for federal prosecution and learn about potential prosecution pitfalls they might encounter in federal gang prosecutions. Attendees will also learn about how sentencing enhancements under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines and the Federal Gang Enhancement are affected by the First Step Act.

            Bios

            Steve Nelson is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as the Anti-Gang Coordinator for the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He earned his J.D. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Utah and serves as an Associate Instructor of Political Science at the University of Utah, and has taught over 2,000 undergraduate and graduate students in his teaching career. 

            Stewart M. Young is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as Senior Litigation Counsel for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He previously served in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of California. He earned his J.D. from Stanford University, clerked for judges on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and the Federal District Court for the District of Utah, and was a full-time faculty member at the University of Wyoming College of Law.


(34) “Introduction to Separatist, Racist and Extremist Groups (SREG’s)”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Group/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Domestic Counter Terrorism Skills; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            This session is an introduction to the various Separatist, Racist, and Extremist Groups (SREGs) in the United States today. The instructors review the founders, origins, beliefs, practices, past and current activities, and significant symbology (e.g., phrases, graffiti, and dates). Call them “Hate Groups” is too simplistic and does not capture the complexity of the problem. The instructors discuss groups that are based on religious belief, political ideology, or racial views.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

 

(35) “Identifying Juveniles At-Risk of Gang and Organized Crime Involvement From Police Records”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Edge Hill University, England.

            One (1) hour

            Special note: will be classroom session taught only on a Monday or Tuesday slot.

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Counseling Techniques; Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            This presentation will focus on the stages of building a therapeutic helping relationship and will explore how practitioners can utilize this system for working with young people. The session will also incorporate a summary of key psychological, social and developmental risk factors that can contribute to a young person’s recovery and desistance. It will focus on how support workers can recognize these risks and work with young people to better understand and address them. The presenter shares research findings and also a practical element on how to deal with psychopathic traits.

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Psychologist and Research Scientist at the Texas Juvenile Crime Prevention Center at Prairie View A&M University. She has an Mphil in Criminological Research (University of Cambridge, England) and an M.S.c. in Investigative Psychology (University of Huddersfield, England). Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. She was a recipient of a Frederick Milton Thrasher Award in 2017 for superior accomplishments in gang research and in 2020 for superior accomplishments in gang training.


(36) A Basic Street Gangs Investigation", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Notice: This course is restricted to Law Enforcement Only.

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            The instructor will give an overview of one of his past street gang investigations. The session covers the example of initiating two search warrants simultaneously at separate locations: leader and second-in-command’s residences. The course covers an overview of the search warrant return (criminal evidence and gang’s intelligence)..

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(37) “Care Theory and Gangs: Implications for Prevention/Intervention Programming in K-12 Schools”, by Martha Wall-Whitfield, Ph.D., Principal, Arkansas Juvenile Assessment and Treatment Center, Bryant, AR.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Counseling Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

             In this session, participants will learn about care theory and implications of this theory when dealing with gang members in a school or juvenile facility. This knowledge will then be applied to practical applications that can be used in the field to help students and staff be productive in class or on site despite gang affiliations. Later in the presentation, the discussion of care theory and practical examples will be linked to Biblical principles.

            Bio

            Dr. Martha Wall-Whitfield is an educator from Little Rock, Arkansas where she is currently the Principal at the state’s largest juvenile facility for incarcerated youth. During her time in Arkansas, she also has been the District Principal for Rite of Passage, overseeing all correctional education in the state. She taught for six years at the University level as an Assistant Professor for Averett University. She currently serves as an Adjunct for Arkansas State University, teaching in the school leadership program. Dr. Whitfield is a mom of five and a Mimi to three. She has been active in both her church as a Sunday School teacher and the community as a foster parent and foster parent trainer for the state.


(38) “The Use of Drones By Gangs To Smuggle Contraband into Correctional Institutions: Part 2 of 3”, by George Knox, Ph.D. and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Special Note: This session is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. It is technically ready to view and complete now, before the conference begins. You will automatically get a password for accessing the video training files once you register for the conference.

            Special note on required reading: please read before viewing this video consists of a document located at: https://ngcrc.com/dronepaper.pdf

            Abstract

            Part 2 in this series provides recent findings from national jail and prison surveys about drones and smuggling. Financial factors are examined with a look at drone incidents in the federal prison system (BOP). An intensive profile analysis is provided for specific drone investigation and prosecution cases — Operation Cellmate (2014-2017) and the Muzzicato case (2019-2020).

            Bios

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

 

(39) “The Use of Drones By Gangs To Smuggle Contraband into Correctional Institutions: Part 3 of 3”, by George Knox, Ph.D. and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Special Note: This session is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. It is technically ready to view and complete now, before the conference begins. You will automatically get a password for accessing the video training files once you register for the conference.

            Special note on required reading: please read before viewing this video consists of a document located at: https://ngcrc.com/dronepaper.pdf

            Abstract

            Part 3 provides two more important drone investigation and prosecution case studies — th Kinser case (2018-2020) and the Fort Dix case (2018-2020). The less successful prosecution case involving the 107 Hoover Crips case in the incident at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary is reviewed. Possible covert indicators of drone smuggling are reviewed along with a listing of the most common types of contraband smuggled into prisons. Drone countermeasures and assistance to correctional agencies is discussed. A short 20-question quiz covers the full 3-part training video series.

            Bios

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).


(40) The Criminal Mind and the Gangster”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            The Criminal Mind; is it biology, sociology, psychology, or choice? This presentation will dive deep into the mind of the criminal and the criminal gang member. The concepts of Sociopathy, Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Psychopathy serve as the framework for this exploration. Candid interviews and videotaped vignettes will illustrate some of the thought processes that have served these individuals in forsaking others to get their individual needs met. Attendees will examine how the criminal mind operates and how such individuals have managed to manipulate even the most innocent of victims. Perhaps even more importantly, law enforcement and mental health professionals will learn ways to protect themselves against con games and strategies utilized by this profile.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 20 years. He also serves as the Acting President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for over 25 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs, teaches college courses and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(41) “The Proud Boys: A Gang Threat Analysis - Part 1 of 2”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Profile Analysis; Domestic Counter-Terrorism; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Special Note: This session is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. It is technically ready to view and complete now, before the conference begins. You will automatically get a password for accessing the video training files once you register for the conference.

            Special note on required reading: please read before viewing this video consists of a document located at: https://ngcrc.com/proudboysprofile.pdf

            Abstract

            The Proud Boys history (2016-2021) has been one of recurrent violent criminal behavior. It has many of the features commonly found in gang life (special rules for behavior, initiation rites, secret codes and language, color patterns, symbols, clothing preferences, etc). It is shown that independent gang research has previously detected the presence of the Proud Boys as a gang or STG problem in the 2019 national survey of gang problems in U.S. jails. There are many other established and emerging white racist extremist gangs in the U.S., but the Proud Boys are not known to have established any kind of positive alliance with any of them. It would be more reasonable to predict that if the Proud Boys are imprisoned and ended up side-by-side with other STG’s, especially white racist extremist gangs, that they might be among the first to want to do harm to Proud Boy inmates. The militaristic culture of the Proud Boys is examined as well as the historical issue of gangs having a connection to the White House.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization. 


(42) “The Proud Boys: A Gang Threat Analysis - Part 2 of 2”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Profile Analysis; Domestic Counter-Terrorism; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Special Note: This session is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. It is technically ready to view and complete now, before the conference begins. You will automatically get a password for accessing the video training files once you register for the conference.

            Special note on required reading: please read before viewing this video consists of a document located at: https://ngcrc.com/proudboysprofile.pdf

            Abstract

            The analysis takes a brief look at sixteen Proud Boys, most of whom were participants in the attack on the Capitol on January 6, 2021. The militaristic culture of the Proud Boys is examined as well as the historical issue of gangs having a connection to the White House. It is concluded that even the oldest gang classification scheme (Thrasher,1927) would define the Proud Boys as a political gang. Little evidence has emerged that the Proud Boys could be defined as a state supported gang. The Proud Boys are more akin to a hybrid or third generation gang. The prediction is that facing overwhelming evidence against them, most Proud Boys facing federal prison for the Capitol attack will plead guilty to reduced charges and the group will disappear into obscurity.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


(43) “Gangs in the Caribbean”, by Dr. Janice Joseph, professor, Criminal Justice Program, Stockton University, Pomona, New Jersey.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs.

            Abstract

            In the last decade, several Caribbean countries have experienced an alarmingly high growth in gang-related violence. These gangs have become Carribean gangs and are now an international concern because of their involvement in drug and arms trafficking going through various transshipment countries. They are also major security threats to some countries in the Caribbean. Some of these Caribbean states are addressing the gang problem through improved policing and law enforcement and through initiating social projects with an emphasis on public health. This presentation will examine the nature and extent of gangs in the Caribbean and attempts to deal with these gangs.

            Bio

            Janice Joseph, Ph.D. is a professor of the Criminal Justice Program at Stockton University, Pomona, New Jersey. She is the Editor for Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice. She earned her Ph.D. degree from York University in Toronto, Canada. She is the author of the book: Black Youths, Delinquency, and Juvenile Justice; and she co-edited the book With Justice for All: Minorities and Women in Criminal Justice; and she has published numerous articles on delinquency, gangs, violence against women, and minorities and crime. She has earned a Frederic Thrasher Award for her research on gangs and has successfully completed several gang specialist training programs at the National Gang Crime Research Center. She was elected to be the president of the World Society of Victimology (WSV) and gives her presidential speech during the 17th International Symposium of the WSV being held in San Sebastian, Spain in June, 2023.


(44) “National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Off Line Search”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, TSEU/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Special restriction: Sworn law enforcement and corrections ONLY.

            Abstract

            What is an NCIC “Off Line Search?” It CAN be a GAME CHANGER for an investigation! It is a special investigative technique available to ALL U.S. law enforcement agencies through the Criminal Justice Information Services Division. It is a proven investigative tool that will search the NCIC files, Interstate Identification Index, and Transaction Log database for investigative information not available with a standard On-line NCIC query. We will look at how the search works and several REAL law enforcement investigation successful conclusions with the use of the Off - Line Search. It is information that can assist in determining crucial information such as but NOT limited to: substantiating or discrediting an alibi, to place an individual at the scene of a crime or miles away from the scene, to track an individual’s movements.

            Bio

            Mr. Grant Smith is a member of the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) external training staff. Mr. Smith is a retired police officer with twenty-two years of law enforcement experience. Twelve of the twenty-two years, he was assigned to a multi-jurisdiction and multi-agency narcotics and violence crime task force as a task force agent and supervisor. Other law enforcement experience includes time in the Patrol Division, Investigations Division, and as a Special Response Team (SRT) leader. He also served as an investigator on the county’s Child Sexual Abuse Task Force, Counter Drug Reduction Team, and was a member of the department’s Police Honor Guard. As an FBI training instructor, Mr. Smith provides NCIC training for municipal, county, state and federal agencies nationwide. He is also part of the FBI’s New Agent Training Team and also participates in CJIS internal training.


(45) “Modern Policing - Under Fire: The Fall of Rome: The end of law enforcement as we know it?”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.             

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gangs and Mental Health; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            Arguably, modern law enforcement is under attack and potentially facing extinction, as we know it. Sociological trends such as Black Lives Matter, viral videos, the Ferguson Effect, the “thin blue line” administrative philosophies combined with preliminary hard data about dwindling enrollment, low morale, scapegoating and politician “policing” are setting the stage for the fall of modern policing. The fall of Rome was largely attributed to systemic factors that are largely mimicked by our present political culture. Could this spell the demise of modern policing? This presentation intends to explore the psychological and sociological risk fac tors for policing as we know it.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 20 years. He also serves as the Acting President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for over 25 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs, teaches college courses and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.

 

(46) “Time to Face the Music: The Use of Rap Lyrics and Videos in the Prosecution of Gang Crimes”, by Grant J. Shostak, EdD, JD, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Lindenwood University, St. Charles, MO; and Myah I. Grimm, student, Lindenwood University, St. Charles, MO.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Internet Investigation; Gang Prosecution; Gangs and the Mass Media.

            Abstract

             This session will provide an overview of the use of rap lyrics and videos in the prosecution of gang crimes. Through examination of real life case examples attendees will learn the ways this evidence is used on behalf of law enforcement in the prosecution of gang crimes; the evidentiary basis for its admission into evidence; and the most common evidentiary hurdles to is use at trial.

            Bios

            Grant Shostak, EdD, JD is an associate professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri. Grant’s extensive experience defending persons accused of criminal offenses and as a law clerk to the late Judge Paul J. Simon at the Missouri Court of Appeals, Eastern District, provides a unique viewpoint on criminal justice issues. His research interests are varied and reflect his interdisciplinary educational background.

            Myah I. Grimm is an undergradute student pursuing a dual major in Criminology and Criminal Justice and Political Science at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, MO, with an anticipated graduation date of May 2022. Upon graduation, she intends to further her studies and attend law school. Myah serves as th Vice President of Lindenwood University’s chapter of the National Society of Leadership and Success. Myah’s research interest include social injustice, women’s rights, and the overrepresentation of certain groups in the justice system.


(47) “The Need for Insider Research: The Opportunities and Challenges of Doing Research Within Your Own Agency”, by Keiron McConnell, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Faculty of Arts, Professor of Criminology, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            This session will explore the challenges, both practical ad ethical with conducting research projects from within the studied group. This session will briefly explain qualitative and quantitative methods that can be drawn upon for research design. Moreover, the session will encourage participants to engage in work related research projects that are robust and defendable. This session will further discuss the current research by the presenter which as serving as a gang police officer interviewed 17 stakeholders, including 5 “former” gang members, 245 hours of field observations with gang units in Canada, United States and the U.K., and a content analysis of newspapers. This session will be of value to professionals considering research from their own agencies, perhaps as a way to satisfy a Ph.D. dissertation project, and certainly to any graduate or undergraduate students involved in gang research. 

            Bio

Keiron holds a Doctorate Degree in Policing, Security and Community Safety from Metropolitan London University, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement come with 29 years of operational experience with the last 15 years exclusively in gang suppression with a variety of police gang units. Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is a faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University where he teaches Organized Crime. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”.  


(48) “Law Enforcement Styles, Individual Characteristics, and the Policing of Gangs”, by Sally-Ann Ashton, Senior Lecturer, Edge Hill University, England, and Wilmer Moran, Corporal, Military Liaison, Office of Constable Alan Rosen, Harris County Constables Office Precinct 1, Houston, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Special note: will be taught only a Monday or Tuesday time slot.

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This workshop will share findings from a recent study to investigate the relationship of military veteran status, personality traits, and life course trauma to policing style, with reference to the policing and management of gangs. The presentation will consider two perspectives: first, community policing, including the role of law enforcement in gang interventions; second, managing gang crime and violence, with reference to officer safety.

            Bios

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Psychologist and Research Scientist at the Texas Juvenile Crime Prevention Center at Prairie View A&M University. She has an Mphil in Criminological Research (University of Cambridge, England) and an M.S.c. in Investigative Psychology (University of Huddersfield, England). Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. She was a recipient of a Frederick Milton Thrasher Award in 2017 for superior accomplishments in gang research and in 2020 for superior accomplishments in gang training. 

            CPL Wilmer Moran is the Military Liaison for the Office of Constable Alan Rosen, Harris County Constables Office Precinct 1. CPL Moran is a prior service U.S. Army veteran with multiple tours in Operation Iraqi Freedom with both the regular and National Guard components of the Army. After achieving Non-Commissioned Officer status, CPL Moran attended Army Basic Instructor and Small Group Instructor training. As a police officer, CPL Moran is a TCOLE Mental Health Officer who has been assigned to the Mental Health Special Operations and Patrol Crisis Intervention Team. CPL Moral is a Field Training Officer and an instructor with his agency for the Mental Health Officer, 40 Hour Crisis Intervention, Cultural Diversity, De-Escalation, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Trauma Affected Veterans courses.


(49)Gang Ethics 101 - Don’t Shoot the Messenger", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gangs and the Mass Media; Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators.

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            This course addresses current trends challenging the modern-day gang specialist. It reviews current issues that affect how we apply apprehension, prosecution, prevention, intervention, restorative justice, and information management practices to gangs and gang members. There are many ethical issues in dealing with gangs and gang members, and it affects every stage of the process, from investigation to aftercare, even gang research itself. Should violence interrupter staff be required to “warn and protect” when they learn that gun violence is imminent? Should someone who joins a gang remain in a gang database for the rest of their life? Attend this session to learn about ethical guidelines for dealing with gangs and gang members and to share your own scenarios.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(50) “An Introduction to the Dark Web for Gang Internet Investigation”, by Dr. Andy Bain, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, University of Mount Union, Alliance, OH.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Internet Investigation; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            This session provides an introductory level examination of investigating gangs in the dark networks of the world wide web. We will review two case examples: 1. Ross Ulbrict- Silk Road Creator (illicit drug sales on the net), and 2. Matthew Falder - Gumtree Pedophile. In tis session you will learn how gangs are using the net, and the development of networks inside the web. Also covered is a comparison between cyber gangs and “traditional” gangs, examples including: 1. The ‘Black Death Group’; 2. The UN investigation into connections between Central American Gangs and Drug Cartels; and 3. Organ Trafficking/Traffickers on the web (using the example from Pakistan). Attend this session to find out what we know and what to look for in your searches. Learn about TOR and other protection software used to hide inside the web, ho do you combat anonymity network software, and the things you need to be aware of as you work in this area. We will also provide you with a list of key terms and resources to help facilitate successful investigations.

            Bio

            Andy Bain is Director of Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Mount Union, Ohio, USA. He holds a Ph.D. in Offender Behavior, a Msc. Criminal Justice and a Graduate Diploma in Psychology. Andy has authored, and edited numerous books, chapters, and articles, on the outlaw motorcycle gangs; law enforcement and technology; and, professional risk working with mental health, social care, and criminal justice, publishing with a number of leading international academic and professional journals. His professional background includes four years with the National Probation Service (England & Wales) and six years running a successful Criminal Justice Consultancy Group, providing guidance and advice to law enforcement agencies and correctional bodies. This, in turn led to the publication of a number of local and national policing and corrections reports.


(51) “Psychopathy and Gang Membership”, Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

            Note: This is scheduled only for the digital video platform as Video #8 at the Videopage..

            Note: You can get credit for this session by watching it now on the VIDEOPAGE and just filling out your evaluation form.

            Abstract

            The relationship between psychopathy and long-term gang membership has been established by a number of academic papers. This presentation will give an overview of psychopathy before exploring its relationship to gang membership for a single sample from adolescence to early adulthood, using longitudinal data from the Pathways to Desistance Study. Finally, the presentation will explore the relationship between psychopathy and the offending patterns of gang membership and will consider the implications of working with individuals who have psychopathic traits.  

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Psychologist and Research Scientist at the Texas Juvenile Crime Prevention Center at Prairie View A&M University. She has an Mphil in Criminological Research (University of Cambridge, England) and an M.S.c. in Investigative Psychology (University of Huddersfield, England). Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. She was a recipient of a Frederick Milton Thrasher Award in 2017 for superior accomplishments in gang research and in 2020 for superior accomplishments in gang training.


(52) “Glenmob, Salty Gangsters and Northern Exposure”: A Discussion of State/Federal Cooperation in the Context of Investigating and Prosecuting a Hybrid Gang”, by Stephen L. Nelson, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah; Stewart M. Young, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Internet Investigation; Advanced Gang Identification; Gangs and the Mass Media; Gang Prosecution; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract

            In 2018, the FBI Safe Streets Task Force, ATF, and Salt Lake Area Metro Gang Unit, with the assistance of the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah, conducted an investigation into Glenmob, a hybrid gang comprised of an alliance of different Sureno affiliates who masqueraded as a rap group but were also responsible for a significant number of drive-by shootings and violent acts in the Salt Lake Valley. This long-term, proactive investigation revealed that Glenmob was also a sophisticated drug trafficking organization. At the conclusion of the investigation, agents and officers seized approximately 15 pounds of methamphetamine, multiple ounces of heroin and 7 firearms and 17 Glenmob members were indicted in federal court. This session will discuss issues related to state/federal cooperation and proactive investigative efforts to infiltrate and dismantle hybrid gangs.

            Bios

            Steve Nelson is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as the Anti-Gang Coordinator for the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He earned his J.D. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Utah and serves as an Associate Instructor of Political Science at the University of Utah, and has taught over 2,000 undergraduate and graduate students in his teaching career. 

            Stewart M. Young is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as Senior Litigation Counsel for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He previously served in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of California. He earned his J.D. from Stanford University, clerked for judges on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and the Federal District Court for the District of Utah, and was a full-time faculty member at the University of Wyoming College of Law.


(53) “Better Intel and Prevention: Monitoring Gang Problems in Bars and Nightclubs”, by Keiron McConnell, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Faculty of Arts, Professor of Criminology, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            Many benefits stem from having a cooperative surveillance system in place to monitor gang members at bars and nightclubs. Bar, restaurant, and club owners do not want the violence that can come from gang members, so they are usually very cooperative. This session describes a community based gang prevention initiative that promotes public safety by denying members of gangs and organised crime group’s entry to bars and restaurants in Vancouver, British Columbia. Bar Watch and Restaurant Watch in partnership with the Vancouver Police and the CFSEU Gang Task Force have significantly reduced the gang violence around participating clubs and restaurants through partnership and exclusion policies. An examination of recent legal statutes and applicability to United States jurisdictions will be discussed. In addition, an examination of the spread of this program in other parts of Canada including legislative change to embody the program in statute. The program has been credited with reducing shootings and decreasing public fear. During this session the audience will also be given some background information about the gang situation in British Columbia and police efforts to combat it. Could some version of this program work in your community? Attend this session and find out.

            Bio

            Keiron holds a Doctorate Degree in Policing, Security and Community Safety from Metropolitan London University, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement come with 29 years of operational experience with the last 15 years exclusively in gang suppression with a variety of police gang units. Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is a faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University where he teaches Organized Crime. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”.


(54) “What Police Gang Specialists Need to Know to Target Harden From Aggressive Defense Cross-Examinations”, by Michael P. Coghlan, Gang Specialist, DeKalb, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Attendance is Restricted: Police Only.

            Session credits: Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Prosecution.

            Abstract

            This class pertains only to police and law enforcement personnel and is restricted as such. This training covers policy and legislation relating to false, overcharged, and political scapegoat charges against police. This session addresses a long list of issues on how police officers need to target harden themselves before they go on the stand. There are a number of strategies that defense counsel can use, foremost of which is to question your credentials in a fashion to discredit your testimony. Audience members will be allowed to share examples of ad hominem attacks they have faced from “out of control” defense attorneys, administrators and officials.

            Bio

            Michael Coghlan was a certified gang specialist accredited through the Illinois Department of Corrections and the Springfield Police Department. He served as a trainer for gang crime specialist certification. He is a recipient of the Thrasher Award and has provided training throughout the United States for the National Law Enforcement Institute. He coordinated the investigation and prosecution of 24 gang members in a series of conspiracies, solicitation, and offenses including drive-by shootings and gang-related murder. He also served 8 years as an elected prosecutor.


(55) “Gang Mapping 201: Theory and Praxis ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Crime Analysis, Mapping, and Digital Forensics; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            This class is part 2 of a 2 part series. Participants learn about criminological research and theories that established the practical application of crime mapping and profiling. Three profiling models will be expounded: psychological profiling, geographic offender profiling, and spatio-temporal crime profiling. Methodological, ethical, and legal issues associated with the use of crime mapping will also be discussed. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).


(56) “Veterans Issues for Law Enforcement”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.         

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gangs and Mental Health; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            Veterans issues have been in the news since WWII Veterans returned home, isolated themselves and some formed the basis for Outlaw Motorcycle Clubs/Gangs. Today, those who were called to serve, answer the call in Law Enforcement and many other noble careers. Some, however suffer the toils of war and combat until death. Few, turn to criminal activity. Being well trained and well armed poses inherent risks to an unwitting and ill-prepared community. Adding to this, issues such as TBI and PTSD, complicate matters further. This presentation is designed to prepare law enforcement and the community with awareness of Veterans issues that may affect us all in some way. With current models of Crisis Intervention Teams, this presentation will expose attendees to a variety of issues, concerns, and answers.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 20 years. He also serves as the Acting President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for over 25 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs, teaches college courses and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(57) “Street Gangs to Terrorism Affiliation”, by Michael P. Coghlan, Gang Specialist, DeKalb, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Prosecution; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            This session provides an examination of the nexus in the relationship between gang organization and terrorist groups. It reviews the commonality in the 44 states which have a criminal code definition of gangs. It also examines the ideological connection between gangs and terrorist organizations. This session provides an examination of what is necessary for a conviction. It examines the elements of the criminal conspiracy. Covers gangs and terrorist groups such as the El Rukns, Muslim Brotherhood, Holy Land Foundation, Hezbollah.

            Bio

            Michael Coghlan was a certified gang specialist accredited through the Illinois Department of Corrections and the Springfield Police Department. He served as a trainer for gang crime specialist certification. He is a recipient of the Thrasher Award and has provided training throughout the United States for the National Law Enforcement Institute. He coordinated the investigation and prosecution of 24 gang members in a series of conspiracies, solicitation, and offenses including drive-by shootings and gang-related murder.


(58) “Where Have All My Organs Gone? Illegal Organ Trafficking”, by Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D., Pricila Avila, B.S., and Mackenzie Williams, Department of Criminal Justice, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Victim, Witness, and Survivor Services.

            Abstract

            Organ transplants have provided medical miracles. The problem is that the demand for organs to transplant is high. Unfortunately, the supply of organs available for transplants is much lower than the demand. This imbalance between supply and demand has led to an illicit market in human organs. This session examines the illegal trafficking in human organs: Who are the traffickers? How are the organs acquired? What countries are involved? What is the nature of the profit motive? These and other important details are examined.

            Bios

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter Sr., Ed.D., is a Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He retired as a Lieutenant with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office after serving from 1977 to 2006. He is rated as a gang expert by the National Gang Crime Research Center. He has written extensively and presented classes on gangs, white supremacist groups and police management topics in the United States and Canada. Dr. Etter earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate degree from Oklahoma State University. Dr. Etter is the author of numerous books, book chapters, edited and refereed articles. His latest book is: Gangs and Organized Crime which he authored with Dr. George W. Knox and Dr. Carter F. Smith.

            Ms. Pricila Avila, B.S. is a graduate student in the Criminal Justice & Criminology program at the University of Central Missouri. She earned her Bachelor of Science - BS in Criminal Justice and Spanish from University of Central Missouri. She is currently working towards a M.S. in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. Pricila is a member of UCM’s Lambda Alpha Epsilon competitive criminal justice team and Alpha Phi Sigma, the Criminal Justice Honor Society.

            Ms. Mackenzie Williams is a graduate student in the accelerated master’s program in Criminal Justice and Criminology at the University of Central Missouri. Her undergraduate studies involved a dual major in criminal justice and sociology. Mackenzie is a member of Lambda Alpha Epsilon-Gamma Epsilon Delta (LAE-GED), Alpha Phi Sigma (APS), National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS), The National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS), and is a criminal justice student ambassador. Ms. Williams is employed with the Department of Homeland Security with the Federal Emergency Management Agency as a National Preparedness Directorates Action Office.

 

(59) “Bigger than Black and Blue: Candid Conversations About Race, Equity, and Community Collaboration”, by Robert T. David Sr., Youth Gang Violence Prevention Coordinator, Danville, VA and Scott C. Booth, Chief of Police, Danville Police Department, Danville, VA.

            90 Minutes (1.5 hours)

            Session credits: Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            This session will discuss how community policing combined with a relationship focused gang intervention strategy drastically lowered violent crime rates I Danville, Virginia. The session will discuss how the combined strategies cultivated peace in the community while the rest of the country began to grapple with a series o African American deaths at the hands of police. Bigger than Black and Blue: Candid conversations about race, equity, and community collaboration will be a benefit to those who desire an opportunity to hear two distinct, but synchronous voices that articulate their unique perspectives about the complex relationship between African American communities and law enforcement.

            Bios

            Robert T. David Sr., Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Coordinator. 2020 recipient of th Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Excellence in Gang Intervention. M.A. in addiction and professional counseling. Creator of Project Imagine the Virginia Municipal League President award winner of most innovative program.

            Chief Scott C. Booth has been in law enforcement for over twenty-eight years and is currently the Chief of Police in Danville, Virginia. Chief Booth first joined the Richmond Police Department, where he served for 19 years, rising to the rank of major. In August of 2015, he joined the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority in Washington, DC, where he served as the Chief of Police. In February 2018, he became the chief in Danville, Virginia, where he has focused on community engagement and reducing violent crime, specifically gang crime in the community. Since his tenure started, Danville has reduced overall violent crime by 64 percent. Chief Booth has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Richmond in Human Resource Management and Leadership Studies and a Master of Science in Criminal Justice from Virginia Commonwealth University. He is a graduate of the 268th session of the FBI National Academy and the 48th session of the Police Executive Research Forum’s (PERF) Senior Management Institute for Police.


(60) “Gang Culture and Social Norms”, by Captain Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Municipal Courts, City Marshall Division, Fort Worth, TX.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            This training session focuses on the realities of gang membership and how outsiders often misconstrue those realities because they do not conform to social norms. A historical, political, and economic lens will introduce attendees to gang cultural and common cognitive schemes used by gang members to justify criminal actions. Additionally, the ability of gang members to manipulate others due to the adoption of contrasting norms is discussed along with the successes and failures of gang prevention, intervention, and interdiction programs. This session concludes with a discussion of the tactics and skills that attendees can use to improve effectiveness of prevention, intervention, and interdiction efforts.

            Bio

            Mr. Swift, Ph.D. is a husband, father, and a 22-year law enforcement veteran. Since April of 2018, Mr. Swift has served as the Fort Worth City Marshal. Prior to becoming the City Marshal, Mr. Swift rose to the rank of Captain in the Denver Sheriff Department. During his law enforcement career he served as a City Marshal, Director of Security, Watch Commander, FTO Commander, Gang/Intelligence Unit Commander, K-9 Unit Commander, Internal Affairs Bureau Investigator, Conduct Review Office Sergeant, Emergency Response Unit member and Sergeant, Court Services Sergeant, and as Adjunct Training Academy Instructor. Mr. Swift holds a MS and Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology from Walden University and has also received dual MBA’s and a BS in Criminal Justice from American International University. Mr. Swift is a published author (Gangs, Outlaw Bikers, Organized Crime & Extremists; Looseleaf Law Publishing), a contributor to Inside Police Psychology: policepsychologyblog.com, and is frequently asked to speak locally and nationally on topics related to gang, criminal, inmate, and law enforcement culture, forensic psychology, and jail gang investigations.


(61) “Understanding the Relationship Between the Individual, Gang Membership, and Desistance from Crime for Adolescent and Youth Adult Males”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England; and Professor Maria Ioannou, University of Huddersfield; and Dr. Laura Hammond, Birmingham City University.

            One (1) hour 

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

            Note: This is scheduled only for the videopage digital video training platform. It is available now as Video #2 at the videopage..

            Abstract

            This presentation will use different research methods to explore the relationship between young people and gangs. Firstly, it will summarize research into the offending frequencies for current, prior and non-gang affiliated offenders using longitudinal data from the US Pathways to Desistence Study. This found that although gang leavers continued to offend, they had significantly different attitudes and scored lower on negative psychological traits than those who remained. Second, it will consider how young people view themselves by a narrative analysis of at-risk young people taking part in a UK gang intervention. The findings suggest that future interventions should consider broader social and psychological risks, rather than gang membership per se, to assess an individual’s risk of recidivism. This session will help those who work with youth gang members to identify those individuals who would be more open to attitudinal changes, including respect for the law, within programmes. 

            Bios

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Psychologist and Research Scientist at the Texas Juvenile Crime Prevention Center at Prairie View A&M University. She has an Mphil in Criminological Research (University of Cambridge, England) and an M.S.c. in Investigative Psychology (University of Huddersfield, England). Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. She was a recipient of a Frederick Milton Thrasher Award in 2017 for superior accomplishments in gang research and in 2020 for superior accomplishments in gang training. 

            The presentation is co-authored with Dr. Maria Ioannou, a Chartered Forensic Psychologist and Reader in Investigative Psychology and Course Director for the Msc in Investigative Psychology at the University of Huddersfield. Maria has been involved in the assessment of intervention programmes for reducing/preventing a range of different forms of criminality.

            And Dr. Laura Hammond, Senior Lecturer and Assistant Course Director for the M.S.c. at Huddersfield and who has worked with academic groups, and law enforcement agencies around the world on a range of consultancy and criminal legal cases.

 

(62) “Gang Violence: The 105 That Used to Be Alive”, by Dr. Ternae T. Jordan, Sr., Lead Pastor, Mount Canaan Baptist Church, Chattanooga, TN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Faith Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Victim, Witness, and Survivor Services.

            Abstract

            Gun violence/gang activity is a public health crisis that is threatening the health and well-being of cities. It will take the cooperation of a whole community to turn the tide and create safe and prosperous communities. While there is a small group of individuals who drive the majority of criminal activity in our cities, we must address every contributing cause that leads to an environment that is ripe for gang activity. We must address the deep-rooted issues that cause the culture of violence to emerge.

            Stop the Madness, Inc, created over 30 years ago, is a model of intervention and prevention designed to engage the faith-based community, along with other organizations, to address the involvement of gang members from our local communities. The presenter will present ways in which everyone in the local community can become engaged.

            Shortly after creating the program in 1992, an innocent victim was shot in the head. To this date, I have eulogized over 105 young people. This message is targeted to those who are dealing with or know of someone who is dealing with finding direction in their lives, recovering from loss, or looking to find clarity through the chaos. Participants will discover how our communities are becoming devastated by youth being raised in fatherless homes and understand how to address the signs of at-risk youth to refocus their paths; and, learn how to develop fundamental boundaries that all positive males should strive to enforce within their homes.

            Bio

            Dr. Ternae Jordan is a highly respected leader and inspirational speaker. He is one of the world’s leaders in spiritual enlightenment, community engagement, and leadership. He is a pastor, mentor, father, and a worldwide transformational and inspirational speaker. For more than 40 years, Dr. Jordan created and shaped community and national initiatives. He is known for his passion and enthusiastic style of delivery and his ability to connect and translate his skills and knowledge into transformational ideas. His passion for serving God and compassion for reaching people extends far and wide. In 1992, he created the award-winning Stop the Madness program. He has received numerous awards, recognitions, and honors including the Jefferson Award from the American Institute for Public Service recognizing him for outstanding public service. Indiana Governor Joseph E. Kernan awarded him the Sagamore of the Wabash Award, the highest honor bestowed on a citizen in the State of Indiana. The word “Sagamore” was a leadership word used by American Indian tribes to describe a great person among the tribe to whom the existing chief would consult for wisdom and advice. Sagamore also means “respected chief” and first appeared in reference to Chingachgook in the classic book The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper.

              

(63) “Stopping the Preschool to Prison Pipeline: The Importance of Gang Prevention”, by Elvis Slaughter, MSCJ, Retired Sheriff’s Superintendent, former fire and police commissioner, criminologist, and author of ten books, including Preschool to Prison: Is It Determined by the School, Environment, or Parent?

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing with Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            This session, “Stopping the Preschool to Prison Pipeline”, explains the factors that could lead children, teenagers, and adults to crime and gangs and provides research-based solutions that help deal with criminal behaviors. The best and most effective time to stop the cradle-to-prison pipeline is as close to the beginning of the pipeline as possible, based on the growing body of research. Early intervention not only helps prevent the onset of delinquent behavior, but it also supports the development of youth assets and resilience. 

            Bio 

            Criminologist Elvis Slaughter served as a fire and police commissioner, and is a retired Cook County Sheriff’s Superintendent with more than thirty years’ experience in criminal justice, corrections, and law enforcement. Slaughter holds a Master’s in Criminal Justice and Corrections. He has authored several articles and ten books, which include Safer Jail and Prison Matters, Mentally Ill Inmates and Corrections, and Preschool to Prison. Elvis is a speaker, security consultant, and correctional auditor. He is also a member of the American Jail Association, American Correctional Association, Hammond Police Citizen Advisory Commission, National Sheriff’s Association, Illinois Sheriff’s Association, and former president of he Illinois Academy of Criminology. Elvis taught criminal justice at the college level.


(64) “Strategies for Working With Gang Involved Youth in Juvenile Facilities”, by Martha Wall-Whitfield, Ph.D., Principal, Arkansas Juvenile Assessment and Treatment Center, Bryant, AR.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Counseling Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            In this session, participants will examine the juvenile justice system and the issues that occur within barbed wire concerning youth involved in gangs. The workshop will unpack practical strategies for handling gang issues in juvenile facilities as well as offering discussion opportunities for participants to share their own successful strategies.

            Bio

            Dr. Martha Wall-Whitfield is an educator from Little Rock, Arkansas where she is currently the Principal at the state’s largest juvenile facility for incarcerated youth. During her time in Arkansas, she also has been the District Principal for Rite of Passage, overseeing all correctional education in the state. She taught for six years at the University level as an Assistant Professor for Averett University. She currently serves as an Adjunct for Arkansas State University, teaching in the school leadership program. Dr. Whitfield is a mom of five and a Mimi to three. She has been active in both her church as a Sunday School teacher and the community as a foster parent and foster parent trainer for the state.


(65) “The Veterans Reception: For Vets Only”, by Dr. Todd Negola, NGCRC Staff; and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN..

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Investigation Skills; Gangs and Mental Health..

            Note on scheduling: This will be held on Monday, July 31st at noon time.

            Abstract

            This is a special reception for vets only. It is held as a noon time event (12:00pm - 12:55pm) on Monday. The purpose is to express appreciation to veterans for their service in the defense of freedom. If you are a vet, come and attend, find a warm, friendly environment. Door prizes. Great chances to network and mingle. Learn something new, meet somebody new. Sponsored by the NGCRC staff, you will feel appreciated here.

Bios

            These men are long time staff of the NGCRC, and are well known for their gang expertise. Todd is also a psychologist whose practice is with vets through the VA. Lee is a vet who still fits into his issued uniform and teaches gang mapping technology, among other topics.

            

(66) “Share What You’ve Learned with Other Professionals”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            One and one-half (1.5) hours

            Session credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            This session reviews what is needed and how to do it in order to share your knowledge of gangs and experiences with other professionals. The basics are covered: identifying a topic and forming questions, layout and content, and citing sources. The goal is to encourage Gang College 2021 attendees to compose either a professional manuscript or a “gang news” story and thereby gain a publication citation of their own. Attendees will learn how to develop and submit a professional article for submission for publication consideration to the NGCRC’s Journal of Gang Research, or if desired, to compose a shorter manuscript for submission to the NGCRC’s The Gang Specialist newsletter. In-class discussion is used to stimulate ideas for articles (e.g., best practices, overcoming worst-case scenarios, new approaches to old problems, etc).

            Bio 

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).


(67) “Correctional Intelligence and Street Crime Investigations”, by Captain Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Municipal Courts, City Marshall Division, Fort Worth, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution.

            Restriction: Attendance of this class is restricted to law enforcement/corrections staff, probation/parole officers, and judicial investigators.

            Abstract

            During this training session, attendees are introduced to criminal intelligence gathering techniques that are leveraged in a correctional setting and the legalities of collecting and sharing it with outside agencies. A case study of the 211 Crew, MSK, and MSN investigation and prosecution is highlighted to discuss the value of correctional intelligence sources, corroboration with jail/correctional staff to “street crime” investigations, and the prosecutions. The shortcomings and successes of this investigation, from a human and technological intelligence standpoint, is reviewed and attendees learn how to avoid similar pitfalls.

            Bio

            Mr. Swift, Ph.D. is a husband, father, and a 22-year law enforcement veteran. Since April of 2018, Mr. Swift has served as the Fort Worth City Marshal. Prior to becoming the City Marshal, Mr. Swift rose to the rank of Captain in the Denver Sheriff Department. During his law enforcement career he served as a City Marshal, Director of Security, Watch Commander, FTO Commander, Gang/Intelligence Unit Commander, K-9 Unit Commander, Internal Affairs Bureau Investigator, Conduct Review Office Sergeant, Emergency Response Unit member and Sergeant, Court Services Sergeant, and as Adjunct Training Academy Instructor. Mr. Swift holds a MS and Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology from Walden University and has also received dual MBA’s and a BS in Criminal Justice from American International University. Mr. Swift is a published author (Gangs, Outlaw Bikers, Organized Crime & Extremists; Looseleaf Law Publishing), a contributor to Inside Police Psychology: policepsychologyblog.com, and is frequently asked to speak locally and nationally on topics related to gang, criminal, inmate, and law enforcement culture, forensic psychology, and jail gang investigations.


(68) Street Gangs Well Defined - For Criminal or Research Intelligence", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to apply tools and measurement to street groups for research and investigative purposes. The instructor will also address the groups inner dynamics, criminal activities, colors and lifespan. 

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(69) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 4 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Note: This is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — available for viewing now through the VIDEOPAGE.

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: 3rd component of gang density; few prisons have programs to help gang/STG inmates quit the gang; small percentage who quit gang life while in prison means basically the first two components of gang density have the greatest weight; gang density adjustment to 63.8% in U.S. prisons is the only estimate with the rigorous three point or triangulated measurement approach; review of the use of 20 strategies to control gangs/STGs; the issue of bus therapy; overwhelming majority of prisons want Congress to pass legislation enabling prisons to jam cell phone signals; new development — about 1/3 of U.S. prisons now report drones have been used to smuggle in contraband (cell phones, drugs); also new — 37.9% of prisons now provide inmates with internet access or email; almost all recognize internet access for inmates creates a new type of danger; few prisons (13.8%) allow prisoner to prisoner email; low grade for federal leadership in responding to the gang problem in the last year; 89.7% expect the gang problem in corrections to increase in the next few years; 79.3% expect the problem of inmate violence from gang members to increase; three-fourths expect an increase in gang members abusing religious rights; 72.4% expect an increase in gang members assaulting correctional officers; and 44.8% expect an increase in radical militancy among inmates.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.

              

(70) “Gang Victim and Witness Protection Services: Challenges for Our Times”, by Elvis Slaughter, MSCJ, Retired Sheriff’s Superintendent, former fire and police commissioner, criminologist, and author of ten books, including Preschool to Prison: Is It Determined by the School, Environment, or Parent?

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Victim, Witness, Survivor Services; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            It is common for victims and witnesses to be intimidated into not cooperating with the criminal justice system. This presentation focuses on the impact of gang-related violence with the goal of better understanding the growing complexities surrounding the victims, witnesses, and survivors of gang violence. In this presentation, we will also look at programs and services to help victims of gang violence. Given the dynamic nature of gang-related violence today, we aim to examine the following: common challenges faced by victims; reasons victims of gang violence fail to pursue their rights; witnesses and survivors common issues; key components of a user-friendly gang victim assistance program; and agencies and programs helping victims of gang violence.

            Bio 

            Criminologist Elvis Slaughter served as a fire and police commissioner, and is a retired Cook County Sheriff’s Superintendent with more than thirty years’ experience in criminal justice, corrections, and law enforcement. Slaughter holds a Master’s in Criminal Justice and Corrections. He has authored several articles and ten books, which include Safer Jail and Prison Matters, Mentally Ill Inmates and Corrections, and Preschool to Prison. Elvis is a speaker, security consultant, and correctional auditor. He is also a member of the American Jail Association, American Correctional Association, Hammond Police Citizen Advisory Commission, National Sheriff’s Association, Illinois Sheriff’s Association, and former president of he Illinois Academy of Criminology. Elvis taught criminal justice at the college level.

 

(71) “Gang/STG Intelligence: What We Know from the U.S. County Jails”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Note: is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. So it is available online now through Aug. 2, 2023.

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American county jails. It covers the kinds of challenges that jail correctional officers face in the real world. Examined in detail are those aspects of gang life that impact on safety and security (fights, threats, attacks, homemade weapons, racial conflict, etc). Attendees will learn get a detailed briefing on what is going on with regard to gangs in the context of American county jail facilities. Upon completion attendees will have a better understanding of the national picture of dealing with gangs in the jail environment.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


(72) “Off the Wall — A Graffiti Art Program”, by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

            Abstract

            Participants will be introduced to a community-based graffiti art program that recruited graffiti writers, graffiti artists, and gang members to educate communities at-risk for HIV/AIDS from 1992-2002. Their messages, on health awareness, were delivered through elaborate hip-hop graffiti formats commonly known as throw-ups, pieces, and productions. 

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(73) “Hybrid Gangs: How to Identify Local Gang Culture”, by Jim Bailey, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI; and Det. Tyler Sutherland, Gang Suppression Unit, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI.

            Two (2) hours

            Both a classroom session and an on-line session. Note: Available now at the NGCRC videotraining page.

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Homicide Investigation; Gang Prosecution.

            Abstract

            How to identify local neighborhood gang culture, what larger gang culture influences your local gang, and how are they being influenced? How does your local gang adapt signs, symbols, tattoos, colors to your jurisdiction which may have originated elsewhere, perhaps even from a national gang culture? How are you tracking your local gang and crime stats?

            Bios

            Detective Tyler Sutherland has been a police officer for the Battle Creek Police Department for over 13 years. He is currently assigned to the Battle Creek Police Detective Bureau, and was previously assigned to the Gang Suppression Unit for over 6 years. As a member of the Gang Unit, Detective Sutherland was directly involved as the lead investigator in a number of gang, and violent crime, cases that resulted in courtroom trials and jury convictions. While participating in all aspects of gang investigations and court room prosecution, Detective Sutherland has been qualified as, and testified as, a gang expert in the U.S. District court and Michigan State Circuit and District Court, more than 15 times in the last five years. One of these gang cases, was the first criminal gang enhancement jury conviction in the State of Michigan since the state statute was created. He is also recognized in circuit and district court as an expert in Drug Trafficking and Drug Investigations. A Defensive Tactics Instructor, and Patrol Training Officer, he has also received Instructor certification for Active Shooter Response for Civilians, through the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center at Texas State University.

            Corporal Jim Bailey has been with the Battle Creek Police Department for over 13 years, and has been assigned to the Battle Creek Police Department Gang Suppression Unit for over 6 years. Corporal Bailey has been directly involved in many of the same gang investigations as Detective Sutherland, and has assisted as one of the lead investigators with Detective Sutherland, on many of the same violence crime investigations. Corporal Bailey has also been involved in cell phone investigations, writing and executing search warrants, surveillance techniques, undercover drug buys, and managing confidential informants. Corporal Bailey has been recognized in Michigan State District Court and Circuit Court as an expert in drug trafficking and drug investigations, identifying armed subjects, and cell phone site analyses. Corporal Bailey is currently a K-9 handler for the Battle Creek Police Department and is a member of the department’s Emergency Response Team. He is a Defensive Tactics Instructor and a Patrol Training Officer for the Battle Creek Police Department. He has also received Instructor certification for Active Shooter Response for Civilians, through the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center at Texas State University.


(74) “Training for Trainers: The Development of Your Own Gang Presentation”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gangs and the Mass Media.

            Abstract

            Have you ever wished to stand center stage and conduct a gang presentation or training? Friends, colleagues, community agencies, and collaborating agencies will ask for your opinion and expertise about gang and crime-related issues as a result of your attendance at the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Annual Conference. This program is aimed to assist you in sharing this knowledge by preparing you to create and deliver your very own gang training.

            A central mission of the National Gang Crime Research Center is to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge, research, and awareness to interested parties and to develop collegial networks. This training is designed to help the audience prepare and deliver a responsible and professional message in a meaningful and impacting manner. This presentation will explore the fundamental concepts of subject matter expertise, research outlets, outline development, use of technology to deliver a message, ethical and professional responsibilities, maintaining an audience’s attention, and incorporating feedback into future presentations.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 20 years. He also serves as the Acting President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for over 25 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs, teaches college courses and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(75) “Coordinating Your Response: A Discussion of State/Federal Cooperation in the Context of Officer-Involved Critical Incidents Involving Violent Gang Members”, by Stephen L. Nelson, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah; Stewart M. Young, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            Officer-involved critical incidents (OICIs) involving gang members raise significant safety concerns for the initial officers. They can also create investigatory complexities for post-incident investigators. These cases further present dynamic opportunities (but also potential pitfalls) for cooperation and collaboration between state and federal law enforcement officials and prosecutors. Using several recent high-profile OICIs involving gang members in Utah, the presenters describe and explain how effective communication, well-designed training, and an appreciation for nuances in jurisdiction can assist state and federal agencies responding to OICIs involving gang members. The presenters will discuss the importance of organization in these types of cases, given the in-depth and, often, multi-jurisdictional nature of these investigations. Finally, the presenters will demonstrate the efficacy of involving federal prosecutors early (often on the day the shootings occur) so that the investigation can run smoothly on both a state and federal level.

            Bios

            Steve Nelson is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as the Anti-Gang Coordinator for the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He earned his J.D. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Utah and serves as an Associate Instructor of Political Science at the University of Utah, and has taught over 2,000 undergraduate and graduate students in his teaching career. 

            Stewart M. Young is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as Senior Litigation Counsel for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He previously served in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of California. He earned his J.D. from Stanford University, clerked for judges on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and the Federal District Court for the District of Utah, and was a full-time faculty member at the University of Wyoming College of Law.


(76) “The Global Growth of Nationalism”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            One and one-half (1.5) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification; Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            Headline: “White nationalism on the rise in the United States!” That’s only a fraction of the whole story. Gang specialists need to attend this session to learn what is happening with regard to nationalism on a worldwide scale. The instructor describes the global expansion of nationalistic pride and its affect on various countries’ politics, economies, and peoples on every continent. Maps, pictures, and videos are used to demonstrate the extent of the problem and how it is reaching into the daily lives of citizens, formal political parties and their agendas, as well as street gangs and hate/extremist groups. The definitional distinction is clarified between nationalism, socialism, national socialism, communism, and fascism.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).


(77) “The OMCG in a Global Perspective”, by Dr. Andy Bain, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, University of Mount Union, Alliance, OH.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Motorcycle Gangs; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            In recent years there has been a clear move to control, organize, and police, the motorcycle gangs (OMCG). This session will add to the body of knowledge, identify areas for growth in the policing of OMCG, and provide for some introduction to the alternative approaches taken in partner jurisdictions. With this in mind the session provides for an explanation of three jurisdictional approaches to tackling the continued position of the OMCG. We will look at the use of RICO laws in the US, and compare this to the VLAD laws in Australia, and the UK where the OMCG members are views as individual offenders - for the purpose of prosecution.

            Bio

            Andy Bain is Director of Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Mount Union, Ohio, USA. He holds a Ph.D. in Offender Behavior, a Msc. Criminal Justice and a Graduate Diploma in Psychology. Andy has authored, and edited numerous books, chapters, and articles, on the outlaw motorcycle gangs; law enforcement and technology; and, professional risk working with mental health, social care, and criminal justice, publishing with a number of leading international academic and professional journals. His professional background includes four years with the National Probation Service (England & Wales) and six years running a successful Criminal Justice Consultancy Group, providing guidance and advice to law enforcement agencies and correctional bodies. This, in turn led to the publication of a number of local and national policing and corrections reports.


(78) Gang Prevention - Intervention - Counseling Networking Reception”. by Martha Wall-Whitfield, Ph.D., Principal, Arkansas Juvenile Assessment and Treatment Center, Bryant, AR and NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour 

            Special Note: 5pm-6pm, Monday, July 31, 2023. You need a ticket for the event, you get the ticket by signing up for it on your registration form. The ticket will be waiting for you in your registration packet you receive when you pick up your conference ID credentials.

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Special Procedure for Sign Up: You need to check the “box” on your registration form in order to qualify to attend this event. It is a “ticketed” event. You get the ticket by signing up for it on the registration form itself or by using the ticket request form at the website, or by sending in a request to that effect..

            Abstract

            The gang intervention/prevention reception is a special event at the NGCRC and it has a long history of also being a valuable networking session. Come hear some analysis of the current state of affairs in gang prevention and learn about some people who are really making a difference in the world. This is also the time and venue in which the “NGCRC Spirit of Excellence Awards” are made. There are also door prizes in a random drawing based on your ticket to the event. You need to have a ticket to attend this event. The only way to get a ticket is to sign up for it in advance on the registration form itself.

            Bios

            This reception is always hosted by trusted NGCRC staff. Hosts for 2023 are Dr. Martha Wall-Whitfield and TBA.

            Dr. Martha Wall-Whitfield is an educator from Little Rock, Arkansas where she is currently the Principal at the state’s largest juvenile facility for incarcerated youth. During her time in Arkansas, she also has been the District Principal for Rite of Passage, overseeing all correctional education in the state. She taught for six years at the University level as an Assistant Professor for Averett University. She currently serves as an Adjunct for Arkansas State University, teaching in the school leadership program. Dr. Whitfield is a mom of five and a Mimi to three. She has been active in both her church as a Sunday School teacher and the community as a foster parent and foster parent trainer for the state.


(79)Burnout in Blue: Exploring Burnout in Law Enforcement and Related Careers”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Counseling Skills.

            Abstract

            Although rarely discussed and infrequently acknowledged, burnout is a common phenomenon. This course is developed for law enforcement and related audiences to explore the unique and rarely understood stressors inherent in this career arena. The theoretical underpinnings of burnout will be introduced, including exploration into the physiological and psychological processes of this experience. Attendees will then be presented with responses, research, and new tactics that have been developed to help advance resilience and coping skills development. This course is vital for everyone, whether novice or seasoned veteran, because burnout will affect all professionals, either directly or indirectly. Participants will leave with practical knowledge which may add years to their career and longevity.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 20 years. He also serves as the Acting President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for over 25 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs, teaches college courses and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(80) “The Law Enforcement, Prosecution, and Corrections Networking Reception”, by Kenneth Davis and Gregg W. Etter Sr., NGCRC Staff.

             One (1) hour

            Special Note: 5pm-6pm in the Millenium Park Room, Tuesday, August 1, 2023. You need a ticket for the event, you get the ticket by signing up for it on your registration form. The ticket will be waiting for you in your registration packet you receive when you pick up your conference ID credentials.

            Session credits: Corrections/STG Gang Intelligence; Dealing with Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prosecution.

            Abstract

            This session is the official meeting of the Law Enforcement/Corrections Networking Reception sponsored by the National Gang Crime Research Center (NGCRC) and hosted by Kenneth Davis and Fred Moreno. You are invited to bring your agency patches as you can be part of a National Patch Swap. Valuable door prizes are given to session participants. Many people return to the NGCRC conference as this is an incredible networking opportunity.

            Bios 

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter Sr., Ed.D. is a Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He retired as a Lieutenant with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office after serving from 1977 to 2006. He is rated as a gang expert by the National Gang Crime Research Center. He has written extensively and presented classes on gangs, white supremacist groups and police management topics in the United States and Canada. Dr. Etter earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate degree from Oklahoma State University. Dr. Etter is the author of numerous books, book chapters, edited and refereed articles. His latest book is: Gangs and Organized Crime which he authored with Dr. George W. Knox and Dr. Carter F. Smith.


(81) “The Graffiti Identity 3: Meeting of the Minds”, by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            Participants are encouraged to exhibit graffiti which appeared within their jurisdiction. So it’s BYOG: Bring Your Own Graffiti (if you want to help expand the discussion). Depending on the size of the audience, this course is suggesting each person should display 5- 10 graffiti images (bring a portable flash drive of the images, or email them in advance to the presenter: gandgspecialist@gmail.com). Don’t worry, you don’t have to be an expert. It’s an exercise directed towards developing intelligence (research/investigation) from an open source (graffiti). Please make sure your portable flash-drive is virus-free. Your subject matter can include graffiti expressing politics, hate, gang, tagger, and/or art. This is part three of a three part course sequence.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(82) “Mexican Cartels and Culture: An Analysis of Gangs Along the Southern Border”, by John J. Rodriguez, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs.

            Note: This session is scheduled for both classroom-based teaching and available now through the video-based training platform.

            Abstract

            The purpose of this course is to increase the knowledge and awareness of military and law enforcement officers on the Mexican cartel activities and culture in both the United States and Mexico. To gain a better understanding of this complex phenomenon, the course will employ a socio-cultural approach by including a brief history of Mexican history and culture. In addition, students will gain knowledge by observing how and where cartels operate and whom they partner up with (i.e., MS-13, Tango Blast, SUR 13, Aryan Brotherhood, Mexican Mafia, etc) to carry out illicit activities. Moreover, musical influences (narco-corridos) will be explored as well as religion/spiritual deities (Santeria, brujas, curanderos, and the Santa Muerte).

            Bio

            Dr. Rodriguez’s interests in academia include but are not limited to gangs, transnationalism, immigration, police issues, and Latinos in the criminal justice system. However, I am most interested in gangs, security threat groups and extremist groups. I have been studying, researching, and writing on these groups and their activity for over almost two decades. I have published and presented much of this work in the U.S. and abroad. I have also consulted and testified as an expert witness in multiple cases, which include deportation of gang members, organized crime, and various homicide cases.


(83) “Critical Incident Management and the First Responder”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            11:21 A.M. April 20, 1999. Two teenagers, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris, open fire at Columbine High School. If you were the first person to be faced with this crisis, what would you do? With all of the historical and current crises facing the world, can you honestly say that you feel prepared to be the first responder?

            This presentation is targeted at anyone interested in learning what to do in the initial phase of a crisis. Why is this important? In 95% of all emergencies, bystanders or victims themselves are the first to arrive at the scene of a crisis. Therefore, it is essential that the responder be knowledgeable about common questions, dilemmas, and demands that may be asked of him or her. This knowledge, along with specific techniques for successful crisis negotiation and an awareness of exactly what should be avoided in a crisis, can save lives. These concepts and more will be addressed in this interactive and practical presentation. The overarching goal of this seminar is to teach any individual how to be a successful first responder to a crisis and ultimately help to prevent tragedies such as Columbine, which resulted tragically in the death of twelve students and one teacher before the gunmen took their own lives.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 20 years. He also serves as the Acting President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for over 25 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs, teaches college courses and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(84) “Using RICO to Attack Hybrid Gangs”, by Michael Tabarrok,Assistant Attorney General 3, Office of the Attorney General Chris Carr, Prosecution Division, Gangs, Atlanta, GA.            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs.

            Abstract

            Attacking hybrid gangs is challenging, and takes gang officers and prosecutors working closely to investigate, build towards indictment, indict, build towards trial, and convict. This is a case study on how a gang unit and an Asst. D.A. prepared a case from investigation through court proceedings to indict 40 gang members under RICO and gang charges.

            Bio

            Michael Tabarrok is the Assistant Attorney General 3, Office of Attorney General Chris Barr, Prosecution Division, Gangs, Atlanta, Georgia. Having been a prosecutor for 24 years around the State of Georgia and Guam, (with a brief stint as a criminal defense attorney in the middle of his career for 3 years), he specializes in the prosecution of gangs, murders, and drugs, as well as asset forfeitures and special prosecutions. Using RICO, gang statutes, forfeitures, and Federal referrals, he brings novel approaches to attacking gang problems.


(85) “Qualifying and Testifying in Court as a Gang Expert”, by Grant J. Shostak, EdD, JD, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Lindenwood University, St. Charles, MO; Rachel Gossett, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Lindenwood University, St. Charles, MO; and Abril Romero, student, Lindenwood University, St. Charles, MO.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Drugs.

            Abstract

            This session will provide an overview of qualifying as a gang expert in court proceedings. Through the examination of real life case examples attendees will learn the ways this evidence is used on behalf of law enforcement in the prosecution of gang crimes; the evidentiary basis for its admission into evidence; and the most common evidentiary hurdles to its use at trial.

            Bios

            Grant Shostak, EdD, JD is an associate professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri. Grant’s extensive experience defending persons accused of criminal offenses and as a law clerk to the late Judge Paul J. Simon at the Missouri Court of Appeals, Eastern District, provides a unique viewpoint on criminal justice issues. His research interests are varied and reflect his interdisciplinary educational background.

            Rachel Gossett, PhD is an associate professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri. She has conducted research at several prisons in Ohio, explored perceptions of improper police behavior using a subset of the NCVS, and most recently worked as program evaluator for the Eastern District of Missouri Human Trafficking Task Force. She is engaged in various research projects, scholarly activities, and reviews textbooks and academic journal article submissions.

            Abril Romero, BA (expected 2023) is an undergraduate student at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri. She is pursuing a major in Criminology and Criminal Justice, and a minor in Sociology. She is a member of the National Society of Leadership and Success, Alpha Chi National College of Honor Society and obtained the Missouri Seal of Biliteracy in Spanish from the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Her future endeavors will pertain to the juvenile justice system, particularly the administration of child welfare services or youth care service.


(86) “The Targeted Killing of Police Officers by Gangs in El Salvador: A Current Trend in Criminal Tactics”, by Aaron Cunningham, Retired, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL; Luis Alonso Montalvo Flores, Policia Nacional Civil, El Salvador; and Lt. Lawrence Lujan, El Paso Police Department, El Paso, TX.

            Two (2) hours  

            Note: This session is restricted to Law Enforcement.

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Homicide Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Domestic Counter-Terrorism.

            Abstract

            This presentation will conduct a survey of assassinations and targeted killings of law enforcement members by criminal organizations within the Northern Triangle region and El Salvador with a focus from 2015 to date. Salvadoran gangs have targeted police officers and police families in numerous ambush attacks resulting in death, primarily when off-duty and alone. The two primary transnational organized crime groups or gangs responsible for these killings are the Mara Salvatrucha (MS-13) and Barrio 18 organizations. These gangs are also engaged in historical competition over territory and economic control of extortion rackets, kidnaping, and narcotics sales. An overview will be provided of the current threat situation, national response, and programmatic initiatives aimed at addressing this problem.

            Bio

            Aaron Cunningham has (25) years of law enforcement experience and retired a 24-year veteran of the Chicago Police Department last assigned to CPIC Fusion Center, Bureau of Counter Terrorism & Special Operations. He is a highly decorated officer with extensive gang experience and past assignments to USATF PSN Task Force, Area Gun Team, Tactical Teams, District Intelligence Officer, and Patrol. His experience entailed joint activity with Federal, State, Local partner agencies, task force, and HIDTA/OCDEFT operations.

            Past performance also includes organization of large format platform-based training events to include the 1st and 2nd International Counter-Terrorism Conference (2012, 2013) for National-level components with intelligence, defense, and police agencies hosted by the Korean National Police Agency, South Korea. Aaron further led an officer survival project, Uso Tactico de la Fuerza y Supervivencia Policial, over (7) years for more than (950) members of El Salvador’s Policia Nacional Civil.

            Luis Flores-Montalvo is a decorated 29 year veteran of El Salvador’s Policia National Civil including ten years with the Grupo Maritimo Policial (GMP) where he conducted interagency work with DEA. Luis is an accomplished in-service training instructor with long term roles in specialized training. He is currently involved in an Officer Survival training project with El Salvador’s Policia Nacional Civil (PNC). He is also a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award from the NGCRC.

            Lawrence Lujan has led a distinguished (33) year career with the El Paso Police Department (EPD) since 1990. He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy (Class 274), and a past Chief Judge, Pueblo at National American Indian Court Judges Association. Lawrence served as Gang Unit Lieutenant, Gang Unit field officer, and tactical team experience with EPD SWAT, Mountain Rescue, and Anti-Burglary. Lawrence has worked alongside the Policia National Civil with ITTA’s ongoing Officer Survival Project ‘Uso Tactica de la Fuerza y Sobrevivencia Policial’.


(87) “Gangs in Central America”, by Janice Joseph, Ph.D., Criminal Justice Program, Stockton University, Pomona, New Jersey.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Domestic Counter-Terrorism; Gangs and Organized Crime; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            Because of the strong migration flows between the U.S. and Central America, the links between the gangs in some Central American countries and the United States have been reinforced. Consequently, these gangs pose a serious threat to the stability of the region, including the United States. The purposes of this session are to examine the nature and extent of the activities of the gangs, their root causes, their links to gangs in the United States, policies and programs in Central America to deal with the gangs, and United States’ attempts to address the gang problems in Central America.

            Bio

            Janice Joseph, Ph.D. is a professor of the Criminal Justice Program at Stockton University in New Jersey. She is the Editor for Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice. She earned her Ph.D. degree from York University in Toronto, Canada. She is the author of the book: Black Youths, Delinquency, and Juvenile Justice; and she co-edited the book With Justice for All: Minorities and Women in Criminal Justice; and she has published numerous articles on delinquency, gangs, violence against women, and minorities and crime. She has earned a Frederic Thrasher Award for her research on gangs and has successfully completed several gang specialist training programs at the National Gang Crime Research Center. She was elected to be the president of the World Society of Victimology (WSV) and gives her presidential speech during the 17th International Symposium of the WSV being held in San Sebastian, Spain in June, 2023.

            

(88) “History of Gang Research: Ivory Tower Meets Street Corner Cop”, by Keiron McConnell, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Faculty of Arts, Professor of Criminology, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Prosecution.

            Abstract

            This session will explore how the history of gang research has been translated into gang crime investigation and prosecution. It is really the matter of the applicability of the research findings to the policing function and legal process. Some ideas clearly have a more salient concern to law enforcement than others. Attend this session to gain insights on how the history of gang research since the time of Thrasher and the present has had a chance to get applied in the real world of gang crime investigation and prosecution.

            Bios

            Keiron holds a Doctorate Degree in Policing, Security and Community Safety from Metropolitan London University, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement come with 29 years of operational experience with the last 15 years exclusively in gang suppression with a variety of police gang units. Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is a faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University where he teaches Organized Crime. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”.

            A second well-known gang researcher has been invited to co-present with Keiron for this session and his information will be posted here when and if the formal paper work is completed.


(89) “Understanding Psychological Risk Factors and Building ‘Therapeutic Helping’ Relationships with Gang Involved Youth”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Edge Hill University, England; and William A. Campbell, Kentucky Juvenile Justice Training, Richmond, KY.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Counseling Techniques; Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Note: This session is scheduled only for the digital video-based platform, available now and listed as Video #12 at the videopage.

            Abstract

            This presentation will focus on the stages of building a therapeutic helping relationship and will explore how practitioners can utilize this system for working with young people. The session will also incorporate a summary of key psychological, social and developmental risk factors that can contribute to a young person’s recovery and desistance. It will focus on how support workers can recognize these risks and work with young people to better understand and address them.

            Bios

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Psychologist and Research Scientist at the Texas Juvenile Crime Prevention Center at Prairie View A&M University. She has an Mphil in Criminological Research (University of Cambridge, England) and an M.S.c. in Investigative Psychology (University of Huddersfield, England). Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. She was a recipient of a Frederick Milton Thrasher Award in 2017 for superior accomplishments in gang research and in 2020 for superior accomplishments in gang training. 

            William A. Campbell is employed with the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice as the Division Director of Professional Development-Training Branch. With 28 years of working with at-risk teens in numerous child care settings ranging from acute care care psychiatric, pediatric child care, private child care & juvenile justice. Originally, a Chicago native, William attended Western Illinois University (WIU) where he received his Bachelors in Communications. After leaving W.I.U. in 1985, he enlisted in U.S. Army and served 8 years and trained soldiers as a Field Artillery Specialist Weapons crew chief. After serving a tour of duty in “Desert Storm” he was stationed in Ft. Campbell, KY 101st Airborne (Air Assault) Division until he was honorably discharged in 1993. William joined the KY Department of Juvenile Justice’s Training Branch in 2007. He has assisted and trained new direct care employees during academy training. In early 2009, certified as an expert gang specialist. In 2010, he received the DJJ Professional Development Employee of the Year award. In 2011, became a trainer/presenter for the National Gang Crime Research Center and received his professional level certification as a gang specialist.


(90) “Gangs and Their Membership”, by Dr. Andy Bain, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, University of Mount Union, Alliance, OH.; and Dr. Keiron McConnell, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Faculty of Arts, Professor of Criminology, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Profile Analysis

            Abstract

            This session provides for an analysis and discussion of the findings from research examining current knowledge and understanding of gangs and the people who join them. We make use of theoretical and practical examples to explore the relationship between what we know, what we understand and how we can best move forward for the future. The importance of such a discussion is evidenced through our dedication to protect those that may become victims, and to create safer communities.

            Bios

            Andy Bain is Director of Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Mount Union, Ohio, USA. He holds a Ph.D. in Offender Behavior, a Msc. Criminal Justice and a Graduate Diploma in Psychology. Andy has authored, and edited numerous books, chapters, and articles, on the outlaw motorcycle gangs; law enforcement and technology; and, professional risk working with mental health, social care, and criminal justice, publishing with a number of leading international academic and professional journals. His professional background includes four years with the National Probation Service (England & Wales) and six years running a successful Criminal Justice Consultancy Group, providing guidance and advice to law enforcement agencies and correctional bodies. This, in turn led to the publication of a number of local and national policing and corrections reports.

            Keiron holds a Doctorate Degree in Policing, Security and Community Safety from Metropolitan London University, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement come with 29 years of operational experience with the last 15 years exclusively in gang suppression with a variety of police gang units. Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is a faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University where he teaches Organized Crime. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”.


(91) “Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs: Why Bother?”, by Lt. Vincent Perillo, Will County Sheriffs Office, Joliet, IL.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Motorcycle Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Internet Investigation; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Restricted: Attendance for Law Enforcement and Corrections/Prosecution Only.

            Abstract

            Law enforcement have said, “why bother working the MC gangs”? They don’t cause problems, they’re just a bunch of old guys riding bikes. Over several decades, OMG’s have been involved in mass fights, shootings, drug activity and more criminal activity is well documented. As the potential for more violence and criminal activity continues to build, those in law enforcement need to have the tools to recognize some of the concerns with motorcycle clubs.

            Bio

            Lt. Vincent Perillo has worked for the Will County Sheriff’s Office since 2004. Started gang documentation in 2006, and became the Will County Adult Detention Facility’s first intelligence Unit Supervisor in 2011. Member of the Midwest Cycle Intelligence Organization (MCIO) since 2012. Member of the International Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Investigators Association (IOMGIA) in 2017. Conducted street gang training since 2012 and motorcycle club training since 2017. Presented at Midwest Gang Investigator’s Association (MGIA), Police Training Institute (PTI), National Gang Crime Research Center (NGCRC), several schools in Will County, St. Joseph’s Hospital staff in Joliet, and all new Will County Patrol Deputies since 2015.


(92) “Prison Gangs: A Global Overview”, by Mitchel P. Roth, Ph.D., Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Sam Houston State University, Houston, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs.

            Abstract

            This session offers an historical and global perspective of prison gangs and their formation. It explores a wide range of gangs, from the Bladebaaz gang of India to the South African Numbers gangs. The session covers different types of organizations and comparisons will give attendees a stronger understanding of these prison subcultures. It will also examine the motivations, behaviors and activities of the organization both inside and outside of prison and discuss how members function within prison environments. The research also compares how far prisons across the world can be considered microstates. Those that attend this session will come away with a better understanding of variations and similarities of prison gangs through time and around the world.

            Bio

            Mitchel P. Roth, Ph.D. is Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Sam Houston State University. His areas of interest include global organized crime and gangs, history of crime and punishment, mass murder and serial homicide. His many books include, Power on the Inside: A Global History of Prison Gangs (2020), Fire in the Big House: The Worst Prison Disaster in American History (2019), The Illicit Economy in Turkey (with Mahmut Cengiz)(2019), An Eye for An Eye: A Global History of Crime and Punishment (2015) and Convict Cowboys: The Untold History of the Texas Prison Rodeo (2016). His books have been translated into Chinese, Persian, Croatian and Turkish. He has been an instructor at the Zhejiang Police College from 2009 to 2019 and at the International Law Enforcement Academy (Roswell) from 2001-2009. In 2020, Dr. Roth was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Excellence in Gang Research.

 

(93) “Stress and Gang Investigators: Transitioning from Work to Home”, by Christopher M. Felton, MS, Fort Wayne Police Department, Fort Wayne, IN.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            It is no secret that suicide is the leading cause of death for police officers. Alcoholism, divorce, etc, are all too prevalent as well. Cumulative stress faced by gang investigators can be especially challenging: the demands of suppressing rising violent crime, managing informants, always targeting/interacting with society’s worst, extra scrutiny from command and courts, deadlines and targets handed down from superiors, working in small units full of Type A personalities, etc. And then you are expected to go home to the family and instantly switch it off; to transition back to a ‘normal’ person. This session will provide investigators with knowledge of cumulative stress and healthy coping mechanisms aimed at helping them manage the emotional rollercoasters they ride every day and transition from work to home. Armed with this info, investigators can lead better, more productive lives both as officers and ‘normal’ people, as well as be prepared to recognize fellow investigators who may be suffering in silence.

            Bio

            Christopher M. Felton, MS is a detective sergeant from the Fort Wayne (IN) Police Department’s Gang and Violent Crimes Unit. Additionally, Det. Sgt. Felton is the team coordinator for the department’s Peer Support/Critical Incident Stress Management Team, represents the department on the Indiana Statewide CISM Team Network, and is a member of the Northeast Indiana Critical Incident Stress Management Team. Det. Sgt. Felton holds two master’s degrees (A Master of Science in Criminal Justice with a concentration on Forensic Psychology and a Master of Philosophy) and is a Ph.D. candidate currently writing his dissertation for his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice - Law and Public Policy. Det. Sgt. Felton is also an adjunct professor at two local universities where he teaches courses revolving around forensic psychology, and teaches police mental health to police officers.


(94) “South Asian Gangs: Evolution of South Asian Gangsters and Their Impact Globally”, by Sgt. Raj Jaswal, Vancouver Police Department, Vancouver, Canada.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Organized Crime; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Abstract

            Sergeant Raj Jaswal will present on the emergence and evolution of South Asian gangs in Canada, speaking about the uniqueness of these gangs while highlighting key crime figures, conflicts and their global networking ability in the United States and beyond. Sergen Jaswal will provide examples of South Asian gang expansion and influence on a trans-national organized crime level.

            Bio

            Sergeant Raj Jaswal has worked within the criminal justice system for the last 15 years in a frontline and investigative capacity as a member of the Vancouver Police Department. Raj has extensive experience in intelligence gathering along with gang enforcement, intervention and suppression. In 2014, he was recognized for his work with a Deputy Chief Constable commendation for developing strategies to curb gang violence in South Vancouver. In 2021, he was recognized for his superior accomplishments in gang investigations by the National Gang Crime Research Center in Chicago, Illinois, with the Frederick Milton Thrasher Award. In 2022, he was recognized for demonstrating outstanding professionalism and profound dedication to the safety of the communities he serves by the Ontario Gang Investigators Association with the Jim Aspiotis Memorial Award.

            Raj is part of a select cadre of Police Officers across Canada who are certified instructors in criminal vehicle interdiction training. Raj provides training and education to Canadian law enforcement o current and emerging trends related to the “travelling criminal”. Raj is also a recognized instructor for the U.S. Drug Interdiction Assistance Program that trains and educates law enforcement officers across the United States.

            Raj has a genuine passion for combining his practical experiences with his educational training. Raj serves as a guest lecturer for post-secondary criminology departments. Raj’s dedication to his community has resulted in him being the recipient of community service awards from within the City of Vancouver for his commitment to the communities he has worked in.


(95) “Understanding the Roles, Behaviors, and Risk Factors and Offending Behaviors of Adolescent Female Gang Members”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Note: This session is scheduled only for the video-based platform. Available now at the videopage as Video #9 at the videopage.

            Abstract

            Using data from the Pathways to Desistance Study, this session will explore the psychological and environmental risk factors associated with female gang members in a sample of 28 participants with a mean age of 16.08 (range between 14 and 18 years of age). The presentation will also consider crime patterns of the sample, and the extent to which their offending differs from their non-gang affiliated counterparts. The session will inform those working with young women who are at risk of gang membership, mental health professionals, and those planning targeted interventions for female gang members.

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University, England. Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. In 2017 she was a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. She currently works with the Violence Reduction Unit at Mercyside Police and is responsible for the evaluation of intervention programs for young people at risk of violent offending and gang membership with Salford Foundation and Greater Manchester Combined Authorities.


(96) “Using AI and Supporting Tech in Griffeye Analyze to Find Critical Evidence on Digital Devices”, by Sherry Torres, Training Manager/Retired LEO, Griffeye, Fort Collins, CO.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Internet Investigation; Gang Crime Analysis, Mapping, and Digital Forensics.

            Abstract

            Are you reviewing pictures and videos from seized cell phones and computers or hours of surveillance footage? Find critical information faster on digital devices using artificial intelligence (AI) or other features in Griffeye Analyxe DI Pro. Examine EXIF data and search for specific criteria, such as faces, tattoos, objects, symbols, and backgrounds with the help of our technology to solve your cases faster. Analyze DI can map available GPS coordinates and show connections among files related by location information, faces, camera, resolution, and other similarities. Import custom keyword lists related to your gang, homicide, and/or drug investigations to search for those relevant terms. Determine whether media was transferred using social media platforms or are connected to publicly available web pages or online accounts. Eliminate ignorable material upfront to focus your efforts on what matter most. Join a former undercover narcotics detective and digital forensics examiner in this session to see how she used technology to streamline her investigations and how it can help you do more of what you do best.

            Bio

            Sherry Torres served 19 years at the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office in Florida, where she started her career in patrol, then five years in narcotics as an undercover detective for organized crime, and finished the last 10 years as a digital forensics examiner investigating internet-facilitated crimes. She worked as a consultant for the United Nations, delivering training worldwide to law enforcement on the use of artificial intelligence (AI) for investigations. She is now the Training Manager for Griffeye and an instructor for the National Criminal Justice Training Center (NCJTC) of Fox Valley Technical College. In her free time, she volunteers as a trainer for the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) and oversees the Digital Forensics Scholarship for Women in Law Enforcement. Sherry has a Master of Science in Digital Forensics, a Bachelor of Arts in Criminology, and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology.


(97) “The Danville Model: A Comprehensive Approach to Addressing Gang Violence Through Focused Policing and Community Engagement”, by Scott C. Booth, Chief of Police, Danville Police Department, Danville, VA; and Major David Whitley, Danville Police Department, Danville, VA.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Organized Crime; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            2016 saw historic highs in violent crime in the City of Danville Virginia, including one of the highest homicide rates per capita in the nation. This trend continued in 2017 with unprecedented occurrences of gang related violence including homicide, aggravated assaults, weapons offenses, robberies, and targeted violent attacks on law enforcement. Gang recruitment and activity grew exponentially in the years leading up to this explosion of violence. The purpse of this presentation is to detail how the Danville Model, created in 2018 was built through the understanding of the city’s history of race relations, gang history, early denial and esponse to gang violence, peak violence, and the causes of gang violence in the city. This presentation will illustrate through various lenses how the implementation and integration of partnerships, Community Oriented Policing, Stratified Policing, Focused Deterrence, data collection and analysis, ad community engagement programs have culminated in 30-year crime lows including a 51 percent decrease in violent crime through 2022.

            Bios

            Chief Scott C. Booth has been in law enforcement for over twenty-eight years and is currently the Chief of Police in Danville, Virginia. Chief Booth first joined the Richmond Police Department, where he served for 19 years, rising to the rank of major. In August of 2015, he joined the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority in Washington, DC, where he served as the Chief of Police. In February 2018, he became the chief in Danville, Virginia, where he has focused on community engagement and reducing violent crime, specifically gang crime in the community. Since his tenure started, Danville has reduced overall violent crime by 64 percent. Chief Booth has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Richmond in Human Resource Management and Leadership Studies and a Master of Science in Criminal Justice from Virginia Commonwealth University. He is a graduate of the 268th session of the FBI National Academy and the 48th session of the Police Executive Research Forum’s (PERF) Senior Management Institute for Police.

            Major David Whitley has 20 years experience working for the Danville Police Department, spending the first five in patrol, becoming sergeant in 2017 working on street crimes and gang homicide. He served as commander of the Civil Disturbance Unit and the Hostage Negotiations Team. He holds a Master of Arts degree. He has had a number of different special recognitions (Award for Lifesaving, VGIA Gang Investigator of the Year Team Award, Distinguished Service medal, Homicide Investigator of the Year Award, and more).


(98) “Project Imagine: Community Violence Intervention and the Impact of Outreach Workers as Credible Messengers”, by Robert T. David Sr., Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Coordinator, Danville, VA; with panelists Curtis Artis, Shakeva Frazier, and Reginald Jeffries, Outreach Workers, City of Danville, VA.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            This is a two part presentation involving a lecture and a panel. Part 1: The session will provide the audience with an understanding of strategies used by Project Imagine, a nationally recognized Community Violence Intervention collaborative model that will assist in the development of a Community Violence Intervention program. Part 2: Credible messengers who act as gang outreach workers will discuss strategies to build relationship, community mobilization and how to adapt to a changing gang culture. Included in the presentation is a Q/A panel discussion which will allow the audience to gain further insight of the duties of the outreach worker.

            Bios

            Robert T. David Sr., Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Coordinator. 2020 recipient of th Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Excellence in Gang Intervention. M.A. in addiction and professional counseling. Creator of Project Imagine the Virginia Municipal League President award winner of most innovative program. Robert has over 25 years of strategic planning & community development experience, a motivated professional with a proven record of generating and building relationships, managing projects from concept to completion, designing collaborative strategies, and coaching individuals to success.

            Curtis Artis is a Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Outreach Worker for the City of Danville. He has an Associate of Arts Science Degree from Danville Community Colleg (Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society), Bachelor of Science (Sociology) Alpha Kappa Delta International Sociology Honor Socciety, DBHDS Peer Recovery Specialist Training, NGCRC Certified Gang Outreach and Intervention Specialist, Virginia Gang Specialist Certification.

            Shakeva Frazier is a Youth and Gang Prevention Outreach Worker for the City of Danville. She holds as Bachelor of Science Degree from Averett University, Certified Suicide Intervention coach. Awarded the Community Partnership Award in 2022 from the Danville Police Department, Member of the Review Board for use of force. University of Virginia certificate in Frank Batton School of Leadership and Public Policy, in Reimagining Policing: Procedural Policing to Procedural Justice. NGCRC certified Gang Outreach and Intervention Specialist. She has ben featured in the Virginia Town and City magazine for her role in Project Imagine.

            Reginald Jeffries is a Youth and Gang Prevention Outreach Worker for the City of Danville where he facilitates the Sports-Based Youth Diversion and developmental program. He is the CEO and Head Coach of the Virginia Dream, a Professional Men’s Basketball Team based out of Martinsville, Virginia. He was a fall 2018 charter member of the Phi Zeta Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated at Radford University.

(99) “Albanian Organized Crime: Is it a real Mafia?”, by Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D., Pricila Avila, B.S., and Mackenzie Williams, Department of Criminal Justice, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Organized Crime; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            Albanian organized crime, or Mafia Shqiptare, operates in Europe, the Middle East, North and South America. Traditionally, Albanian organized crime is clan or fis or fare based. Albanian organized crime engages in drug smuggling, weapons trafficking, human and sex trafficking. This study examines the characteristics of Albanian organized crime groups. The study looks into how they are organized. Who are their allies and enemies? What are their crimes?

            Bios

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter Sr., Ed.D., is a Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He retired as a Lieutenant with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office after serving from 1977 to 2006. He is rated as a gang expert by the National Gang Crime Research Center. He has written extensively and presented classes on gangs, white supremacist groups and police management topics in the United States and Canada. Dr. Etter earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate degree from Oklahoma State University. Dr. Etter is the author of numerous books, book chapters, edited and refereed articles. His latest book is: Gangs and Organized Crime which he authored with Dr. George W. Knox and Dr. Carter F. Smith.

            Ms. Pricila Avila, B.S. is a graduate student in the Criminal Justice & Criminology program at the University of Central Missouri. She earned her Bachelor of Science - BS in Criminal Justice and Spanish from University of Central Missouri. She is currently working towards a M.S. in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. Pricila is a member of UCM’s Lambda Alpha Epsilon competitive criminal justice team and Alpha Phi Sigma, the Criminal Justice Honor Society.

            Ms. Mackenzie Williams is a graduate student in the accelerated master’s program in Criminal Justice and Criminology at the University of Central Missouri. Her undergraduate studies involved a dual major in criminal justice and sociology. Mackenzie is a member of Lambda Alpha Epsilon-Gamma Epsilon Delta (LAE-GED), Alpha Phi Sigma (APS), National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS), The National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS), and is a criminal justice student ambassador. Ms. Williams is employed with the Department of Homeland Security with the Federal Emergency Management Agency as a National Preparedness Directorates Action Office.


(100) “Gang Crisis Prevention in Juvenile Facilities”, by William A. Campbell, Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice, Richmond, KY.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Abstract

            This session will discuss how successful early non-verbal/verbal de-escalation can be achieved to prevent a major crisis within a juvenile detention or residential setting. The instructor has 24 years of experience in working with at-risk juveniles in a wide variety of settings: acute care psychiatric, pediatric child care, private childcare, and juvenile justice. He is a certified instructor for Safe Crisis Management.

            Bio 

            William A. Campbell is the Division Director of Professional Development for the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice. With 26 years of working with at-risk/adjudicated teens in numerous settings ranging from acute care psychiatric, private residential treatment and group home & juvenile justice detentions. Originally, a Chicago native, William attended Western Illinois University where he received his Bachelors in Communications. Served in the US Army and is a Desert Storm Vet as member of the 101st Airborne (Air Assault) Division, honorably discharged in February 1993. In March of 1993 William began his career working with at-risk/adjudicated adolescents in an acute care psychiatric hospital. William joined the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice’s Training Branch in 2007. He has assisted and trained new direct care employees during academy training. In early 2009, certified as an expert gang specialist. In 2010, he received the DJJ Professional Development Employee of the Year award. In 2010, became a Trainer for Trainers at the National Gang Crime Research Center. William currently resides in Elizabethtown, Kentucky and is also a member of the Juvenile Justice Alternative to Detention Initiative Committee.