WHAT: The Biggest and Best Gang Training Conference --- Gang School 2018.


When? --- August 6th, August 7th, August 8th, 2018


Where is it being held? --- Chicago: Westin Michigan Avenue Hotel


Why Attend? Read more inside this on-line version of the brochure.

 

Who Should Attend: Anyone who is impacted by the gang problem, whatever your role, rank, or status in life. If you can be potentially enlisted in the fight against gangs, you are welcome. From prosecutor to corrections professional, from gang specialist police officer to gang counselor at the local high school or a local prevention program; or maybe you are just someone who wants to learn a lot more about gangs and network with others nationwide.

How to Attend: A registration form is provided at the end of this file, you can fax it in or mail it in. You can print out just the Registration Form itself at www.ngcrc.com/register.html        

 

NGCRC CONTACT INFO: (TEL: 708 258-9111; FAX 708 258-9546).

 


The 2018 NGCRC 21st International Gang Specialist Training Conference


2018 Conference Information Site--- The Full Text On-Line Version


Last UPDATED: September 20, 2018

 

 

© Copyright 2017, NGCRC, Chicago, IL.. You are now in the "2018 Conference" section of the National Gang Crime Research Center, this is a lengthy fext file that explains everything you could possibly want to know about the exciting gang training conference being held in Chicago, August 6-8, 2018; the main website of the NGCRC is: www.ngcrc.com Click here if you want to visit the main page of the NGCRC: www.ngcrc.com.

 

What's New: We have started to add sessions or courses to the 2018 curriculum.

          The NGCRC has already, at this early stage, started to list the training sessions that will be included in the 2018 Curriculum. See full information below.

 

What's New: Presenter Bio's Now Available.

        The NGCRC has started to list the bio's for the presenters and trainers who will be speakers at the 2018 NGCRC Gang Training Conference. See full information below.

 

What's New: The statistical evaluation results from the 2017 Conference are now posted here, below.

     The NGCRC is unique in another way, it's transparency with regard to rigorous evalution and sharing these results at the NGCRC website. The results from the evaluation data from the 2017 conference are now provided here, below.


This is Your Invitation to Attend the August 6-8, 2018 Conference:

          It's the conference you cannot afford to miss. In the summer of 2018, the National Gang Crime Research Center will hold its 21st international gang training conference in Chicago --- once again bringing together the Nation's top experts on gangs and gang-related issues.

             It's the experience you’ve come to expect --- the opportunity to network with law enforcement, corrections, private sector professionals from all over the country and abroad.

          Once again, the NGCRC will be offering you an enormous variety of choices to craft the education that is most pertinent to you and your jurisdiction.

          You'll come away with new insights, the latest intell, and the most effective strategies to combat gangs.

            You cannot afford to miss the NGCRC's 21st International Gang Specialist Training Conference in Chicago next summer (2018).

          Don't delay!

          There is a registration form for you at www.ngcrc.com/register.html and at the end of this large text file which describes the training conference in great detail.

 


 

AN INVITATION FOR GANG SPECIALIST PRESENTERS:


Dear Gang Specialist:


 The NGCRC cordially invites you to consider making a presentation at the 2018 Twenty First NGCRC International Gang Specialist Training Conference (August 6-8, 2018 at the Westin Hotel). The 2018 event is going to be a major event in gang training. There will be some new and wonderful events at the 2018 NGCRC Conference, you will want to be a part of it. Perhaps doing so as both an attendee, plus being a presenter too. There is still a little time to get a session added to the 2018 conference.



 This is your formal invitation to submit one or more “session proposals”. What makes you particularly competitive as a potential presenter is of course the fact that you already know the NGCRC training conference format. So you pretty much know how we do things.



 To help you get started, below, please find a "Session Proposal Form". It is simple, there are only a couple things we need on the form. The most important is going to be the topic and the abstract. We encourage you to think creatively. We can also help you if you want it: we can help you with picking a topic, or with finalizing a topic. To get help, just call (708) 258-9111 and ask to speak to someone from the 2018 Curriculum Committee. Or leave a number, and someone will call you.

 

The NGCRC supplies the following equipment to all training rooms and thus to all presenters: an LCD or data projector. We do not supply laptop computers. You must bring your own laptop to connect to the LCD projector. The NGCRC also supplies a screen, work or equipment table, a lecturn, and a power strip, and an external speaker if you need it (we like to use Bose Soundocks, but we have other models). Overhead projectors are not provided.

 

If you need audio equipment, we have an assortment of computer speakers that can be checked out of the Goodwill Ambassador's Equipment Room, you will need to check in with them when you first arrive at the conference. Some audio equipment like the large and powerful speakers (we have a few of the Bose Sound Dock speakers, has connector to iPod or iPhone) need to be reserved at the Equipment Room if you want it set up in advance in your room, so check in with them Sunday evening or Monday morning. If you need to buy your own connector cables or anything for your laptop there is a BestBuy right across the street from the conference hotel. You need to go to the equipment room as soon as you get to the conference to check in with them if you want any sound system or speakers. Feel free to bring your own speakers even your own LCD or data projector if you like.

 

You can also get help with “creative ideas” for a new session proposal. We already know what some of the “need areas are”, so you can get good feedback and counseling from the NGCRC on the type of session that will be “popular” and well attended in 2018. We can do this interactively with you on the phone, again, just call (708) 258-9111 and ask to speak to someone from the 2018 Curriculum Committee. Or leave a number, and someone will call you. You will find more information about the call for presenters below. Note: The call for presenters will likely end early this year, as we had over N = 120 different sessions in the 2018 program. So act now if you are interested.



Cordially,

 

 

George W. Knox, Ph.D.

Executive Director

NGCRC




CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS FOR THE 2018 NGCRC 21st INTERNATIONAL GANG SPECIALIST TRAINING CONFERENCE:


 This is an official invitation for you to be a presenter at the 2018 NGCRC 21st International Gang Specialist Training Conference to be held in Chicago, August 6-8, 2018 at the Westin Hotel Michigan Avenue.


You want to act quickly on this invitation to become a presenter at the 2018 NGCRC conference. We are planning on some new and exciting events this year. You want to become a part of this exciting 2018 Conference. Please note, though, that no financial incentives of any kind (including waiver of registration fees) can be offered. Presenters will be expected to be registered for the conference, unless special arrangements are made.


 You are cordially invited to submit a session proposal for the 2018 NGCRC gang training conference. You are allowed to submit and present more than one proposal.


 The presentations may vary in length from a minimum of one hour to a maximum of three hours. Most sessions are one or two hours in length. You will need to select a title that accurately reflects what people will learn in the session; you need to specify how long the session will last in duration; you need to decide which “tracks” your session will give credit for; you need to provide a short “abstract” or description of what the session will cover; and you need to provide a short "bio" about yourself.


The "Session Proposal Form" is provided below for your use. Please follow that as a template or guideline. Feel free to call if you have questions (call 708-258-9111, just ask to speak with someone from the 2018 Curriculum Committee).


 If there was a topic you wanted to consider for a session, but you needed some information or clarification: then again, you are encouraged to call any time in this regard ---- for example, just to “run an idea” up the flag pole, would a certain topic be useful at the conference, etc. While the NGCRC is very good at nurturing new presenters, we are not able to offer you any type of financial assistance. Note: The call for presenters will end shortly.

 

Here is some good advice to anyone interested in being a presenter at the NGCRC Conference: make sure that the content of your session corresponds to the title of your session. There is an evaluation form that all attendees complete, and they are asked to evaluation and provide a rating of between zero "0" (not effective) to ten "10" (very effective) as a range of how effective the speaker was. So do not subject yourself or the NGCRC to any potential criticism for having a misleading session title. The best way to avoid such a potential criticism is once you start your power point presentation, right after the title page, your second page of the power point presentation should be an outline of what is actually covered in your session. You might also created a page for what is not covered in your session, in both cases at the start up of your session. This way, if someone is looking or shopping for a specific issue, they have time to get up and leave right away and go to a different session. There are always 7 or 8 or more sessions going on at once.


Your proposal(s) will be evaluated by the 2018 Curriculum Committee. We are usually able to get back to you with a decision in ten (10) days. You can use the form below or a facsimile of this form to submit your session proposal.

 



Call for Presenters:


2018 NGCRC Conference Session Proposal Form


 (Worksheet and Outline)


 


Title of Your Session:_________________________________________________________



Duration of Your Session in Hours:_______________ hours



Any restrictions on who can attend? ___Yes ___No (if Yes, who do you want to restrict this to___________)



What Track(s) Will This Session Fit Into?_________________________________________



Abstract (describe what people will learn in your session, about 100-150 words)


__________________________________________________________________________


__________________________________________________________________________


__________________________________________________________________________


__________________________________________________________________________


__________________________________________________________________________



Bio (describe your credentials, achievements, 100-150 words)


___________________________________________________________________________


___________________________________________________________________________


____________________________________________________________________________





Please submit your session proposal soon, call if you have any questions. Fax it to: (708) 258-9546 and then mail it to make sure we get it: NGCRC, 2018 Curriculum Committee, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468. Warning: The call for presenters will close early this year.



Here is one sample of a session from a previous NGCRC conference, note the format has a “gang” issue in the title; gives a duration; specifies what tracks the session will be useful for (feel free to call about this if you need help: call 708-258-9111, just say you want to talk to someone from the Curriculum Committee).


 "Gangs and Extremists in the American Workplace and Military: A Current Assessment", by Dr. Michael J. Witkowski, CPP, Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, MI.


 Duration: Two (2) hours


 Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs in the Military.


 Abstract


 Gang member infiltration of American occupations now includes legitimate businesses/corporations as well as military careers. Gang life on many military installations is now common as gang members move with parents in the military from place to place helping disseminate gang culture. Some so-called super gangs (e.g., Gangster Disciples) encourage military ties for gaining access to weapons and training. This security concern with gangs in the American workplace and military is legitimate given present day terrorist linkages. This segment will seek to enlighten security and law enforcement professionals on the emergent threats posed by street gangs and extremist groups who are increasingly entering mainstream occupations and the armed services.


 Bio


 Dr. Michael J. Witkowski, CPP is a nationally known security litigation expert with many years experience in handling civil litigation relating to street gangs. He has researched gang activity in a variety of venues including: public housing, casinos, fast-food restaurants, apartment complexes, concerts, shopping centers, and convenience stores. He is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and administers the Graduate Program in Security Administration at the University of Detroit Mercy. He teaches courses in Juvenile Justice and Gangs and Deviant Social Groups and is a regular presenter to the Detroit Police 80 Hour Crime Prevention School. He is also a member of the Crime Prevention Association of Michigan (CPAM).




THE NGCRC IS NOT ABLE TO PROVIDE ANY FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE OF ANY KIND TO PRESENTERS:


 This is a longstanding policy, but needs to be formally declared in writing when dealing with the issue of invitations for presentations. Please be advised that the NGCRC is not able to provide any financial assistance of any kind to presenters. The NGCRC does not ask for any government subsidy, and thus no funding is available to assist presenters along these lines. The NGCRC treasures the intellectual freedom it has in addressing the kinds of issues it addresses, and it may not be able to offer some of its curriculum features with government subsidies or there could be a disadvantageous expectation from government funding that relates to our current “independence”. The NGCRC by making this invitation for session proposals specifically declares that this it is not able to provide any kind of financial assistance, subsidy, allowance, fee, honorarium, per diem, travel, or reimbursement of expenses, etc for such persons make presentations.



TOPICS WE REALLY NEED PRESENTERS FOR:


"How To 'Gang Proof' the School Zones in Your Jurisdiction".


 “How to Achieve Better Community Relations and Still Achieve Effective Gang Enforcement”.


"How to Achieve Pure Primary Gang Prevention in the School".

 

"Zero to Low Cost Gang Prevention and Intervention Program Services You Can Offer in Your Jurisdiction".


“How to Start a Gang Court in Your County”.

"Innovative Techniques for Interviewing Gang Members and Gang Associates".


"What We Really Need for Gang Prevention Laws in the Next Decade"


"The Use of the Polygraph in Gang Interviews/Debriefings".

 

"What We Really Need for Gang Investigation Skills in the Next Decade"

  

"How to Start a New Gang Renunciation Program in Your Correctional Facility".

 

"How the Federal Procurement Process Works for Getting Federal Grants and Funding for Your Gang Prevention/Intervention Program: NIJ, OJJDP and Others"

 

"New Technology to Fight the War Against Gang Violence".

 

"Dealing With Gangs on the Reservation"

 

"Gang Involvement in Credit Card Fraud"

 

"Gang Involvement in Identity Theft"

 

"An Analysis of Native American Gangs" .

 

“The Anatomy of a Gang Prosecution: From Crime Scene to Final Appeals and Parole Hearings”


"Advanced Gang Identification About Crips"

 

"Advanced Gang Identification for Blood Gangs".

 

"Recent Developments in Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs".


“New Developments in Social Media Usage by Gang Members”

 

"New Laws that We Really Need for Gang Prosecution in the Next Decade"

 

"How to Monitor the Internet Sites Related to Your Community That May Have Gang Shout Outs and Gang-Related Activity (Recruiting, Gang Message Boards, etc)"

 

"New Policies/Procedures We Need in Corrections to Deal More Effectively With Gangs/STG in the Next 10 years".

 

"Things that Work and Don't Work in Dealing With Gang Members in Juvenile Correctional Facilities"

 

"How to Effectively Use Anonymous Cash Rewards for Solving Cold Case Gang-Related Crimes".  


"New Policies/Procedures We Need in K-12 Public Schools to Deal More Effectively With Gangs in the Next 10 Years".


"How to Start a New Faith-Based Gang Prevention/Intervention in Your City".

 

"How to Increase Respect for the Law Among At-Risk Youths and Gang Members"

 

"How to Implement a Gang Victim Assistance Program"

 

"Building Trust in Our Communities: Overcoming the Stop Snitching Gang Distrust Problem"

 

"How to Increase Ethnic, Racial and Cross-Cultural Tolerance Within a Gang or At-Risk Population"

 

"Gangs and Organized Crime Involvement in the Sale of Body Parts"

 

"Gang Involvement in Human Trafficking"

 

"The Use of Drone Technology in Gang Investigation"

- - - -

 

The 2018 NGCRC 21st International Gang Specialist

Training Conference (August 6-8, 2018):

A Look at the Presenters



Last Updated: September 20, 2017


James A. Anderson, M.A.

            James A. Anderson is a Deputy State Fire Marshal in Minnesota and a State Fire Inspector. He is a fire science instructor with the Fire and Emergency Education Department at Saint Cloud Technical College. He has participated as an evaluator in numerous state level fire service certification board examinations throughout the State of Minnesota. James has presented and taught at several Minnesota state fire school conferences. James is a second generation firefighter and has been an active member in the fire service since 1993 as both civilian and military (8 years active duty Air Force Firefighter). Along with years of firefighting experience he has obtained both his M.S. and B.A. in Criminal Justice from Saint Cloud State University and an A.A.S. in Fire Science from the Community College of the Air Force, all of which have an emphasis on forensic fire science and arson investigation. James was awarded the Arnold Sibet Award for Outstanding service to the Crystal Fire Department and was awarded the Air Force’s Outstanding Unit Award with Valor while serving as a firefighter during his first deployment for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Recently James was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for the year 2012 for Superior Research.


Sally-Ann Ashton

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a postgraduate researcher in the International Centre for Investigative Psychology at University of Huddersfield and a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University. In 2017 she was a recipient of a Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for superior accomplishments in gang research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. The presentation is co-authored with Dr. Maria Ioannou, a Chartered Forensic Psychologist and Reader in Investigative Psychology and Course Director for the Msc in Investigative Psychology at the University of Huddersfield.

Maria has been involved in the assessment of intervention programmes for reducing/preventing a range of different forms of criminality. And Dr. Laura Hammond, Senior Lecturer and Assistant Course Director for the M.S.c. at Huddersfield and who has worked with academic groups, and law enforcement agencies around the world on a range of consultancy and criminal legal cases.


Dr. Gregg W. Etter Sr., Ed.D.

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter Sr., Ed.D. is a Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He served with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office in Wichita, Kansas from 1977 to 2006, retiring as a Lieutenant. Dr. Etter is the author of three (3) books, six (6) chapters in books, thirty (30) refereed articles and eighteen (18) edited articles. He earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate Degree from Oklahoma State University.


Dr. D. Lee Gilbertson

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University as a professor in the Department of Criminal Justice. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.


Kristopher B.E. Hansgen

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.


Dr. Mario L. Hesse, Ph.D.

            Mario L. Hesse, Ph.D. is a professor of criminal justice at the St. Cloud State University (MN). Dr. Hesse’s research and teaching interests are in corrections, gangs and media and crime. Mario has extensive experience working in the corrections field (adult community-based programs, juvenile detention centers and juvenile probation). Mario has published articles in ACJS Today, Corrections Today, Great Plains Sociologist, Criminal Justice Review, and the Journal of Gang Research. Currently, Mario is a review-editor for the Journal of Gang Research and an associate editor for Forensics Scholars Today. He is a coauthor of Gangs (2016) and Juvenile Justice: The Essentials (2010) textbooks. Mario is a staff member and frequent presenter at the National Gang Crime Research Center.


Keiron McConnell 

            Keiron holds a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement comes with 22 years of operational experience with a large Criminal Justice Agency. In addition, Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Royal Roads University, and at Douglas College in the Criminology Program. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”. He is currently a Doctorate Candidate at the London Metropolitan University in London, England.


Fred Moreno

            Fred is a staff member with the NGCRC; formerly an investigator with the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. He is a retired police officer from the Chicago Police Department with extensive historical experience with gangs. He also heads up the NGCRC’s Goodwill Ambassador Program.


Todd D. Negola, Psy.D.

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


Michael G. Nerheim

            Lake County State’s Attorney Michael G. Nerheim has extensive experience working in all criminal divisions of the Lake County State’s Attorney’s Office. As a former assistant state’s attorney and now as the Lake County State’s Attorney, his experience includes areas of complex litigation, criminal defense and municipal law. Michael G. Nerheim demonstrates strong leadership and business experience, and is heavily involved in the Lake County community.


Dr. John Jacob Rodriguez

            Dr. Rodriguez is an associate professor at the University of Texas at Arlington in the Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice. He has been studying, researching, and writing on gang activity for over 16 years. He has published and presented much of his work in the U.S. and abroad. He has also consulted and testified as an expert witness in multiple cases including but not limited deportation of gang members, organized crime, and various homicide cases.


Dr. Carter F. Smith, JD, Ph.D.

            Dr. Carter F. Smith, JD, Ph.D. Is a Lecturer in the Criminal Justice Administration Department at Middle Tennessee State University. He was a U.S. Army special agent with the Criminal Investigative Division for over twenty-two years. Dr. Smith is the author of five (5) books, twelve (12) refereed articles and two (2) edited articles. He earned his Bachelor’s degree from Austin Peay State University, his Juris Doctorate from Southern Illinois University, and his Doctorate degree from Northcentral University.


Terrance L. Stone

            Terrance graduated from California State University, Los Angeles, with a credential as a State Certified Gang Intervention Specialist. He serves on several committees which include the Sand Bernadino County Sheriff’s Citizen Advisory, the San Bernardino City Chief of Police African American Advisory Committee, Executive Board Member and Chair of the San Bernardino Countywide Gangs and Drugs Task Force, past board member of the African American Chamber of Commerce, and the San Bernardino NAACP chapter. He was selected by former Mayor of San Bernardino, Pat Morris, to join his office on the California Cities Gang Prevention Network. He is committed to steering young people away from gangs. While his main program office is in San Bernardino, his program has developed offices in Atlanta, Georgia, and Phoenix, Arizona, along with Houston, Texas and Denver, Colorado.

 - - -

 

THE SCHEDULE OUTLINE FOR THE 2018 NGCRC TRAINING CONFERENCE

 

The Preliminary Schedule of Session Day, Time, and Room Locations for the 2018 NGCRC 21st International Gang Specialist Training Conference (August 6-8, 2018):

Version 1.0 Last updated:


            LEGEND of Symbols: “Ts” = Tracks = the session credits = the training tracks that particular session gives credit for attending (the training track number is provided after the “Ts” symbol appears). Room location names are in all caps.


Schedule Entry Example: the course being taught on Monday from 8:00am-9:00am (when) is Session #21 (what), entitled “Graffiti Identity 1”, by Det. Ken Davis (who), and it is taught in the Chicago Ballroom room (where), and it gives session credit for training tracks 1, 4, 7, 9, 19, 20, 29 and 30.. Track #1 is “Gang Crime Investigation Skills”. There are 32 different tracks. You need to know your track name and your track number. The list of the tracks and track numbers is on the registration form and at the main conference website: www.ngcrc.com/2017.conference.html



Sunday, August 5, 2018:


12:00pm Noon Exactly: NGCRC staff and volunteers assemble in the Operations Center (GARFIELD PARK ROOM), on the third floor, to unload the truck and prepare the Goody Bags.


3pm-8pm: Registration - pick up your ID, your registration file folder, and your goody bag at the Operations Center (GARFIELD PARK ROOM), on the third floor.

 

3:00pm - 5:00pm:

Sessions:

   

 

Monday, August 6, 2018:

6:00am:

Registration - pick up your ID, your registration file folder, and your goody bag at the Operations Center (GARFIELD PARK ROOM), on the third floor.

                        

7:00am - 7:45am

Opening Ceremony: Chicago Ballroom, 16th Floor (west end of the hotel). Welcoming. Awards Ceremony. Everyone urged to attend.

 

8:00am - 12:00pm: Sessions

 

1:00pm - 5:00pm: sessions

                        

5:00pm - 6:00pm:

(98) Gang Prevention - Intervention - Counseling Networking Reception”. This is hosted by Douglas L. Semark, Special Executive to the Board, Gang Alternatives Program, Los Angeles, CA. MILLENIUM PARK. Ts: 5; 7; 12; 18; 22. 


6:00pm- 7:00pm:


7:00pm - 8:00pm:



 

TUESDAY, August 7, 2018:


06:00am - 08:00am: Early Bird Sessions

 

8:00am - 12:00pm: Sessions

 

1:00pm - 5:00pm: sessions

 

5:00pm-6:00pm:

(94) “The Law Enforcement, Prosecution, and Corrections Networking Reception”, by Fred Moreno and Dr. Gregg W. Etter, NGCRC Staff. Ts: 1; 2; 13; 16.

 

5:30pm - 8:00pm:


6:00pm-7:00pm:


6:00pm - 8:00pm:



WEDNESDAY, August 8, 2018:


6:00am - 8:00am: Early Bird Sessions

 

8:00am - 12:00pm: Sessions

 

1:00pm - 5:00pm: sessions

                          

5:00pm: ALL TRAINING IS OVER WITH. TRAINING ROOMS NOW BEING EVACUATED.


5:00pm-6:00pm:

PROCEED TO THE NGCRC OPERATIONS CENTER (GARFIELD PARK) TO SUBMIT YOUR EVALUATION FORM TO THE NGCRC STAFF.

PICK UP YOUR CERTIFICATES IN GARFIELD PARK. NOTE: HAVE YOUR EVALUATION FORM READY TO BE EXAMINED TO SEE IF YOU HAVE COMPLETED THE MINUMUM HOURS REQUIRED (24 overall, at least 4 of which are in your Training Track).


After 6:00pm: NGCRC staff have gone. Your Evaluation Form is still important. Can you please mail your Evaluation Form to the NGCRC?


WE WISH YOU SAFE TRAVEL ON YOUR RETURN HOME. WE HOPE WE SEE YOU NEXT YEAR.

 

# # #

 


 

- - - -

Want a Short Six Page "Brochure Version" of What is in This Lengthy File?

        Some people like all the details, that is provided in this file (www.ngcrc.com/2018.conference.html). Others need something "short and sweet" to attach to a travel request. We have that too: it is the six page basic "Brochure Version" of this lengthy and detailed conference file. It also includes a registration form and cost information.

         Click here for the Six Page Brochure Version in PDF Format.

 

- - -

 Statistical Evaluation Results from the

2017 NGCRC Training Conference:


INTRODUCTION

            The 2017 Twentieth International NGCRC Gang Specialist Training Conference was held during August 7-9, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. The statistical evaluation results are reported here from the large number of persons attending the conference who provided such evaluation surveys. What this documents is an amazing level of “success” as measured in terms of the satisfaction of those who attended.

            The bottom line finding here is that the NGCRC offers training that is consistently rated as exceptional in value and quality.


THE NGCRC ATTRACTS THOSE WITH AND WITHOUT PRIOR TRAINING ON GANGS

            One statistical result from the evaluation forms completed by those attending the 2017 NGCRC training conference reveals the NGCRC attracts those with and without prior training in gangs. The question on the evaluation form was “Have you received training at other gang seminars?“ In fact, for 2017 some 42.0 percent indicated that they had not previously received any training about gangs. Thus, some 58.0 percent of those attending the NGCRC training conference indicated that they had in fact been previously trained on gangs.


FEW ARGUE WITH THE FACTS: THE NGCRC OFFERS MORE CHOICES THAN ANYONE ELSE

            One very powerful statistical result from the evaluation forms completed by those attending the 2017 NGCRC conference relates to the number of choices a person does or does not have in terms of different options for classes to attend. In some training programs there is no choice at all, or few or very limited choices. Some 99.0 percent of those attending the NGCRC 2017 conference reported that “compared to other gang conferences I have attended, the NGCRC had more choices for sessions”.


THE NGCRC ATTRACTS NEW AND REPEAT TRAINEES

            The NGCRC 2017 Evaluation Survey asked the trainees whether this was the first time they had attended an NGCRC conference. The question on the evaluation form was, “This is the first time I have ever attended one of the Gang Training Conferences by the NGCRC.” The results indicated that 74.4 percent of those attending the 2017 conference did so for the first time. In other words, about a fourth (some 25.6 percent) of those who attended the 2017 conference did in fact have previous training at an official NGCRC training conference.


OVERWHELMING MAJORITY REPORT “BEST GANG TRAINING EVER”

            As a testament to the high quality of the training experience at the 2017 NGCRC training conference, another significant statistical result from the evaluation indicated an exceptionally high level of satisfaction with the training. Some 84.8 percent of those attending the conference reported that it was, “in my opinion, the best gang training event I have ever attended.” Such high levels of praise from people all over the USA and abroad are indeed hard to achieve.


ALMOST EVERYONE WANTS TO COME BACK NEXT YEAR

            Another measure of the validity of high levels of satisfaction among those attending the NGCRC’’s 2017 conference is found in the results to the question measuring intention to “come back next year”.

            The evaluation instrument included the following question: “I would like to attend the NGCRC's 21st International Gang Specialist Training Conference that the National Gang Crime Research Center is currently planning. ___True ___False”.

            Some 92.6 percent of those who attended the 2017 conference indicated that they want to attend the 2018 conference as well.


ACHIEVING NETWORKING: A GUARANTEED RESULT AT THE NGCRC CONFERENCE

            Three separate evaluation questions addressed the issue of “networking” because this is always an important “added benefit” of any training, and it becomes particularly valuable as a resource when dealing with gang problems.

            The first question asked, “Did you meet any new gang specialists that you may be able to network with in the future while you were at this conference”. The results of the evaluation question about whether the participants at the 2017 NGCRC training conference were able to achieve networking showed an astounding 95.9 percent reported that they were able to achieve such networking while at the conference.

            The second question sought to establish a baseline for how important the factor of “networking” was to those attending the 2017 NGCRC conference. The second question therefore asked the participants “Was the opportunity to network with other gang specialists something that you wanted to achieve while at this conference?” Here we find that 93.8 percent indicated that networking was an important goal for them at the conference. Based on this, it is safe to say that everyone achieved their goal of networking at the 2017 NGCRC Training Conference.

            A number of specialized “networking receptions” were available to anyone who wanted to participate in these events during after hours. These are well planned and well managed events designed to enhance networking among professionals. Thus, a third and final question about networking in the evaluation survey asked, “Did you attend any of the special networking receptions?” Here we find that over two-thirds, some 69.2 percent, attended one or more of these specialized reception events.


VERY HIGH LEVELS OF SATISFACTION WITH THE QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF TAKE HOME TRAINING MATERIALS

            The rating system used by the NGCRC to evaluate the performance of the trainers and presenters, as well as its own operations, utilizes a “scale” of values from an absolute low value of “zero” to indicate the low extreme of “not satisfied” to an absolute high value of ten (10) to indicate the high extreme of “very satisfied”. Thus, the “score” in such cases is easy to interpret: the higher the score, the higher the level of satisfaction.

            The “mean score” is what is used to calculate an overall score for performance. The mean is the arithmetic mean, a measure of central tendency in the data, and it is calculated by means of an SPSS analysis. SPSS is a statistical software package widely used in the social sciences and criminology.

            The evaluation form included the following question measuring the quality of materials: “How satisfied were you with the quality of the take home training materials provided to you?”. Each participant is provided with a “take home goody bag” that contains various printed training materials for future use. The results indicated a mean score of 7.62 on a zero to 10 point scale.

            A second question asked, “How satisfied were you with the quantity of take home training materials provided to you?” And here again a very high score emerges, a mean value of 7.73 was found for this factor.


MANY WON SOMETHING IN ONE OF THE RAFFLES

            There are various raffles at the NGCRC conference, some occur at the networking receptions and some are scheduled through the Operations Center.

            The evaluation form asked the conference participants, “Did you win anything in any of the raffles?” The results indicated that over half of those who attended, or 65.1 percent of those attending the conference, reported winning something in one of the raffles.


OVER A THIRD DID FIELD TRAINING OR BALLGAME

            The exit survey question in the evaluation form ask the attendees “did you go on any of the tours, ballgames, or ride-a-longs”? Some 46.1 percent of the attendees, over a third, indicated that in fact they had in face went on a tour, or attended an NGCRC sponsored ballgame event, or a ride-along.


HIGH LEVELS OF SATISFACTION WITH NGCRC STAFF

            The evaluation form included the question “How satisfied were you with the staff and volunteers of the National Gang Crime Research Center in terms of making your experience at the training conference a quality time?”. The results indicated a mean score of 8.85 on a scale between zero and ten, again a very high level of satisfaction with the NGCRC staff. The staff provide a number of useful functions to the conference participants, from security to equipment technician support.


NGCRC GUESTS OFTEN BRING ADDITIONAL FAMILY MEMBERS WITH THEM

            The NGCRC promises a “family friendly” environment for its conference participants and provided some special features in this regard (e.g., Family ID cards allowing them to take advantage of discounts at restaurants, etc in the area). The evaluation form asked “Did you bring other family members to Chicago this visit?” and the results indicated that 6.7 percent brought one or more other family members with to the conference. There was even a separate question asking attendees to “rate” the hotel, and they gave it very high marks, a mean score of 8.73 on a zero to ten rating scale is a very high level of satisfaction.


CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS GAVE “HIGH GRADES” TO THE NGCRC AS AN OVERALL EVALUATION RESULT

            Finally, another question on the evaluation form asked the 2017 NGCRC conference participants to “Give us your grade for how we did overall in trying to make this conference experience a good one for you. For a final grade, I give this conference an ___A ___B ___C ___D ___F.”

            The results indicated that most (58.8%) gave the NGCRC an “A”. An additional 35.7 percent gave the NGCRC a grade of “B”. Thus, 94.6 percent of the trainees rated the NGCRC training experience as an “A” or “B”, the highest possible grades. Again, from a different way of measuring the same thing (overall training experience), we find additional strong evidence of a high level of satisfaction among persons who attended the conference. A GPA of 3.53 (where 4=A, 3=B, 2=C,1=D,0=F) was the mean score from this analysis. Thus, conference attendees gave the NGCRC an overall grade of “A minus/B Plus” it would appear from the 2017 evaluation results: again, a remarkable achievement.


- - -

 Statistical Evaluation Results from the

2016 NGCRC Training Conference:


INTRODUCTION

            The 2016 Nineteenth International NGCRC Gang Specialist Training Conference was held during August 8-10, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. The statistical evaluation results are reported here from the large number of persons attending the conference who provided such evaluation surveys. What this documents is an amazing level of “success” as measured in terms of the satisfaction of those who attended.

            The bottom line finding here is that the NGCRC offers training that is consistently rated as exceptional in value and quality.


THE NGCRC ATTRACTS THOSE WITH AND WITHOUT PRIOR TRAINING ON GANGS

            One statistical result from the evaluation forms completed by those attending the 2016 NGCRC training conference reveals the NGCRC attracts those with and without prior training in gangs. The question on the evaluation form was “Have you received training at other gang seminars?“ In fact, for 2016 some 37.35 percent indicated that they had not previously received any training about gangs. Thus, some 62.7 percent of those attending the NGCRC training conference indicated that they had in fact been previously trained on gangs.


FEW ARGUE WITH THE FACTS: THE NGCRC OFFERS MORE CHOICES THAN ANYONE ELSE

            One very powerful statistical result from the evaluation forms completed by those attending the 2016 NGCRC conference relates to the number of choices a person does or does not have in terms of different options for classes to attend. In some training programs there is no choice at all, or few or very limited choices. Some 99.4 percent of those attending the NGCRC 2016 conference reported that “compared to other gang conferences I have attended, the NGCRC had more choices for sessions”.


THE NGCRC ATTRACTS NEW AND REPEAT TRAINEES

            The NGCRC 2016 Evaluation Survey asked the trainees whether this was the first time they had attended an NGCRC conference. The question on the evaluation form was, “This is the first time I have ever attended one of the Gang Training Conferences by the NGCRC.” The results indicated that 62.2 percent of those attending the 2016 conference did so for the first time. In other words, over a third (some 37.8 percent) of those who attended the 2016 conference did in fact have previous training at an official NGCRC training conference.


OVERWHELMING MAJORITY REPORT “BEST GANG TRAINING EVER”

            As a testament to the high quality of the training experience at the 2016 NGCRC training conference, another significant statistical result from the evaluation indicated an exceptionally high level of satisfaction with the training. Some 84.0 percent of those attending the conference reported that it was, “in my opinion, the best gang training event I have ever attended.” Such high levels of praise from people all over the USA and abroad are indeed hard to achieve.


ALMOST EVERYONE WANTS TO COME BACK NEXT YEAR

            Another measure of the validity of high levels of satisfaction among those attending the NGCRC’’s 2016 conference is found in the results to the question measuring intention to “come back next year”.

            The evaluation instrument included the following question: “I would like to attend the NGCRC 19th International Gang Specialist Training Conference that the National Gang Crime Research Center is currently planning. ___True ___False”.

            Some 94.6 percent of those who attended the 2016 conference indicated that they want to attend the 2016 conference as well.


ACHIEVING NETWORKING: A GUARANTEED RESULT AT THE NGCRC CONFERENCE

            Three separate evaluation questions addressed the issue of “networking” because this is always an important “added benefit” of any training, and it becomes particularly valuable as a resource when dealing with gang problems.

            The first question asked, “Did you meet any new gang specialists that you may be able to network with in the future while you were at this conference”. The results of the evaluation question about whether the participants at the 2016 NGCRC training conference were able to achieve networking showed an astounding 99.6 percent reported that they were able to achieve such networking while at the conference.

            The second question sought to establish a baseline for how important the factor of “networking” was to those attending the 2016 NGCRC conference. The second question therefore asked the participants “Was the opportunity to network with other gang specialists something that you wanted to achieve while at this conference?” Here we find that 95.6 percent indicated that networking was an important goal for them at the conference. Based on this, it is safe to say that everyone achieved their goal of networking at the 2016 NGCRC Training Conference.

            A number of specialized “networking receptions” were available to anyone who wanted to participate in these events during after hours. These are well planned and well managed events designed to enhance networking among professionals. Thus, a third and final question about networking in the evaluation survey asked, “Did you attend any of the special networking receptions?” Here we find that over two-thirds, some 68.4 percent, attended one or more of these specialized reception events.


VERY HIGH LEVELS OF SATISFACTION WITH THE QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF TAKE HOME TRAINING MATERIALS

            The rating system used by the NGCRC to evaluate the performance of the trainers and presenters, as well as its own operations, utilizes a “scale” of values from an absolute low value of “zero” to indicate the low extreme of “not satisfied” to an absolute high value of ten (10) to indicate the high extreme of “very satisfied”. Thus, the “score” in such cases is easy to interpret: the higher the score, the higher the level of satisfaction.

            The “mean score” is what is used to calculate an overall score for performance. The mean is the arithmetic mean, a measure of central tendency in the data, and it is calculated by means of an SPSS analysis. SPSS is a statistical software package widely used in the social sciences and criminology.

            The evaluation form included the following question measuring the quality of materials: “How satisfied were you with the quality of the take home training materials provided to you?”. Each participant is provided with a “take home goody bag” that contains various printed training materials for future use. The results indicated a mean score of 7.60 on a zero to 10 point scale.

            A second question asked, “How satisfied were you with the quantity of take home training materials provided to you?” And here again a very high score emerges, a mean value of 7.55 was found for this factor.


MANY WON SOMETHING IN ONE OF THE RAFFLES

            There are various raffles at the NGCRC conference, some occur at the networking receptions and some are scheduled through the Operations Center.

            The evaluation form asked the conference participants, “Did you win anything in any of the raffles?” The results indicated that over half of those who attended, or 56.7 percent of those attending the conference, reported winning something in one of the raffles.


OVER A THIRD DID FIELD TRAINING OR BALLGAME

            The exit survey question in the evaluation form ask the attendees “did you go on any of the tours, ballgames, or ride-a-longs”? Some 44.3 percent of the attendees, over a third, indicated that in fact they had in face went on a tour, or attended an NGCRC sponsored ballgame event, or a ride-along.


HIGH LEVELS OF SATISFACTION WITH NGCRC STAFF

            The evaluation form included the question “How satisfied were you with the staff and volunteers of the National Gang Crime Research Center in terms of making your experience at the training conference a quality time?”. The results indicated a mean score of 9.00 on a scale between zero and ten, again a very high level of satisfaction with the NGCRC staff. The staff provide a number of useful functions to the conference participants, from security to equipment technician support.


NGCRC GUESTS OFTEN BRING ADDITIONAL FAMILY MEMBERS WITH THEM

            The NGCRC promises a “family friendly” environment for its conference participants and provided some special features in this regard (e.g., Family ID cards allowing them to take advantage of discounts at restaurants, etc in the area). The evaluation form asked “Did you bring other family members to Chicago this visit?” and the results indicated that 10 percent brought one or more other family members with to the conference. There was even a separate question asking attendees to “rate” the hotel, and they gave it very high marks, a mean score of 8.77 on a zero to ten rating scale is a very high level of satisfaction.


CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS GAVE “HIGH GRADES” TO THE NGCRC AS AN OVERALL EVALUATION RESULT

            Finally, another question on the evaluation form asked the 2016 NGCRC conference participants to “Give us your grade for how we did overall in trying to make this conference experience a good one for you. For a final grade, I give this conference an ___A ___B ___C ___D ___F.”

            The results indicated that most (65%) gave the NGCRC an “A”. An additional 29.6 percent gave the NGCRC a grade of “B”. Thus, 94.7 percent of the trainees rated the NGCRC training experience as an “A” or “B”, the highest possible grades. Again, from a different way of measuring the same thing (overall training experience), we find additional strong evidence of a high level of satisfaction among persons who attended the conference. A GPA of 3.59 (where 4=A, 3=B, 2=C,1=D,0=F) was the mean score from this analysis. Thus, conference attendees gave the NGCRC an overall grade of “A minus/B Plus” it would appear from the 2016 evaluation results: again, a remarkable achievement.

- - -

Comments from those who attended the 2016 NGCRC Training Conference in Chicago:


SAMPLE COMMENTS FROM 2016 ATTENDEES:

 

“ ‘Networking’ with others was very helpful in gaining intel.”, “Baseball game” and “The variation of classes and the freedom of choosing the sessions I want to attend”. Captain Loretta D. Wells, Nebraska Department of Corrections, Omaha, NE.

 

“I have been to the conference 4 times over the last 5 years and there has been new material presented each year.” Crystal Thomas, Evansville Police Department, Evansville, IN.

 

“I have been to many drug and gang conferences. The NGCRC Conference is, by far, the best conference I have attended. Very few will offer such a wide range of expertise.” Mike O’Brien, F.B.I. Federal Gang Task Force, Moline, IL.

 

“The overall conference was great! I appreciate how organized everything was. The location was perfect. Most of the presenters appeared to be subject matter experts. This was my first time attending, it will not be my last.” Zaneta P. Simpson, Mecklenburg County Sheriffs Office, Charlotte, NC.

 

“The best part of the conference is you can always find what your looking for from the vast array of instructors. From a basic class to a more extensive approach. This training is still the best in the nation & you will get out of it exactly what you put into it.Michael Robbins, Adams County Sheriffs Office, Brighton, CO.

 

“As always 1st class training totally relevant useful information. Best gang training conference in the country, networking heaven!! Thank you Dr Knox and staff, looking forward to next year.Dominick J. Cicala, New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission, Trenton, NJ.

 

“You have some of the best instructors that I have ever heard and I've taken classes for over 21 years.Det. Jason Dwight Hudson, Louisville Metro Police Department, Louisville, KY.

 

“I have been a gang detective for 9 years and actually learned new things about street gangs and gang culture.Det. Rigoberto Amaro, Waukegan Police Department, Waukegan, IL.

 

“Very well organized. Up to date information.” Lt. Kenneth Winklepleck, Douglasville Police Department, Douglasville, GA.

 

“I really like the way classes are setup. You can travel from class to class and go to the ones that interest you the most. Also really enjoyed the variety of topics”. William Noon, Toledo Police Department, Toledo, OH.

 

 

SAMPLE COMMENTS FROM PREVENTION/INTERVENTION AREA:

 

“As an educator that works with At-Risk youth I feel as though I am much more informed and prepared to address gang members/activity. I feel as though all of my presenters were experts and will to help me understand my students.” Jennifer Shimon, teacher, Kenosha Unified School District, Kenosha, WI.

 

“Variety of option in courses to choose from. Hotel was great environment for conference & centrally located. Opportunity to network w/ people across the nation & world.” Chevist Johnson, S.O.E. Kingdom, Sacramento, CA.

 

“Networking and all the amazing information from the speakers.Edgar Caceres, Lawrence Family Development & Education Fund, Lawrence, MA.

 

“The presenters are always very professional and every year I leave the conference with a new level of expertise.” Christopher L. Mallette, Executive Director, Chicago Violence Prevention Strategy, Chicago, IL.

 

“Out of all the conferences that I attend, this organization has been the most effective. The topics & presenters have inspired me to do more w/ at risk youth”. Leonard D. Hunt, Cincinnati Job Corps, Cincinnati, OH.

 

“All instructors and classes were great.” John Reyes, Second Chance Through Faith, Colorado Springs, CO.

 

“The vast amount of information and knowledge in the courses, I wish I could have done more. My dept. could not find the money for this conference. I paid my own way and I will do it again.” Edward Savage, Shelby County Schools, Project Prevent, Memphis, TN.

 

“Meeting everyone was the best experience. Being able to network and get contacts was an experience I will not forget”. Osiris Gomez, Lawrence Family Development & Education Fund, Lawrence, MA.

 

“I learned some very valuable information to use when I get back to my community.” Lorenzo Lawson, Youth Empowerment Zone, Columbia, MO.

 

“Great way to network and obtain new ideas and programs to try.” Kelly W. Roberts, Topeka Public Schools Police, Topeka, KS.

 

“The conference offered a large buffet of trainings with subject matter experts.” Lonnie L. Hall, Gary Job Corps Center, San Marcos, TX.

 

“Lots of classes to pick from”, “Lots of people to network with”, “2nd time attending.” and “Always learn something and find the sessions to be full of information.” Scott Hatch, Penobscot Job Corps, Bangor, ME.

 

“There was so much valuable information that can be learned and applied in so many situations.” Steven Cochran, Penobscot Job Corps, Bangor, ME.

 

 

SAMPLE COMMENTS FROM CORRECTIONS AREA:

 

“The presenter(s)s were excellent”. John Douglas “A-Train" Atkinsson, Vel R. Phillips Juvenile Justice Center, Milwaukee, WI.

 

“I’ve been coming to this conference since 2009! I’ve met some great people and have been afforded the opportunity to be a presenter, networking and collaborating with like minded professionals. Always looking forward to learning more and doing more for Gang Research and the NGCRC! Can’t wait until next year.” William A. Campbell, Training Academy Coordinator, Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice - Training Center, Elizabethtown, KY.

 

“This conference provides opportunity to network and collaborate with other presenters in establishment of purposeful and meaningful relationships.Jewel N. Jones, STG-Gang Coordinator, Ohio Department of Youth Services, Cleveland, OH.

 

“Very informative, instructors were very knowledgeable, information was easy to understand.” Jeff Caskey, detention supervisor, Polk County Sheriffs Office, Des Moines, IA.

 

“The variety and quality of classes and speakers”. Michael Artmann, Jail Intelligence Deputy, Hennepin County Sheriffs Office, Minneapolis, MN.

 

“The ability to complete the track to your own needs”, “Thanks” and “Love the experience”. Captain Matilda Serna, Nebraska Department of Corrections, Tecumseh, NE.

 

“Eye opening - work being done by LEO & Corrections to research & communicate what is happening”. Captain James Foster, Nebraska Department of Corrections, Lincoln, NE.

 

“Breakfast & Snacks!”, “The speakers are very smart & interactive!”, “The chairs w/cushions on them.”, “Carter F Smith, Dr. Simon Harding, Todd D. Negola & Deepa Patel are fantastic, very smart, intelligent, funny, interactive and keep the presentation entertaining.” and “Thank you to them.” Natalya Kandakova, Minnesota Department of Corrections, Burnsville, MN.

 

“Great speakers”. Clint LaFar, Peoria County Juvenile Detention Center, Peoria, IL.

 

“I have been teaching and working with juveniles for 5 years and I learned more about these gang culture, how to better work with them, and how the gangs are evolving in the last 3 days than my 5 previous years”. Timothy E. Cech, Peoria County Juvenile Detention Center, Peoria, IL.

 

“Presentation material.” Captain Shawn Freese, Nebraska Department of Corrections, Lincoln, NE.

 

 

COMMENTS FROM PROSECUTION AREA:

  

“Network; great selection of classes; I learned a lot!”. Lindsey Moreland, Assistant District Attorney, Nashville, TN

 

“Opening ceremony is a fantastic start, with so many tracks it's the only event that is open to everyone being together.” Elizabeth Caratini Buerger, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Palatine, IL.

 

“I liked the format (cafeteria style course selection)”. Crystal Uhe, Madison County State’s Attorneys office, Edwardsville, IL.

 

“The various professionals that were available to speak - from educators to attorneys, investigators, and parole|probation officers. To hear the different perspectives was extremely valuable. The presentation on Tactical Interviewing was AMAZING! By far the most interesting and helpful presentation throughout the course.” Merry M. Saunders, Athens County Prosecuting Attorneys Office, Athens, OH.

 

“Opportunity network, speakers willing to discuss class outside of session. Location|hotel & price were great. The opportunity to meet w/ experts & individuals heavily versed in the world of gangs provides for a priceless opportunity to learn & grow as a prosecutor.Kristi Wilson, Assistant District Attorney, Douglas County District Attorneys Office, Douglasville, GA.

 

“The classes being non-regimented were nice having different lengths starting at different times and no breaks in between made the day far more seamless.” Kyle Aber, District Attorneys Office, Pueblo, CO.

 

 

COMMENTS FROM PROBATION/PAROLE/AFTERCARE AREA:

 

“Networking, Topic discussion”. Derrick Parker, Aftercare Specialist, Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice, Chicago, IL.

 

“My best part of this conference was receiving one of the spirit awards. I can only imagine all the hard work that Mr. Knox and his staff puts into this training and to take the time to learn what certain people are doing in this field and then recognizing them is such an honor. The knowledge I gained from this training is something I am excited to take back to my team and share to move forward on our Gang Court and addressing gang issues.” Kelly Hobbs, Probation Officer, Metro Juvenile Court, Nashville, TN.

 

“Some great new sessions”. Kevin Kreuser, Cook County Juvenile Probation, Chicago, IL.

 

“The quality & knowledge of the trainers was exceptional. Additionally, everyone was very open|available to answer questions afterwards.” Matt Mills, juvenile probation officer, DeKalb County Court Services, Sycamore, IL.

 

“Great Overall Speakers.Luis Lopez, Cook County Juvenile Court, Chicago, IL.

 

“I learned new & useful information.Sara J. Mentore, Supervisory U.S. Probation Officer, U.S. Office of Probation & Pretrial Services, Gulf Port, MS.

 

“The information that I learned increased my knowledge of gangs”. Valencia E. Dedaux, U.S. Probation Office, Gulf Port, MS.

 

“The variety of topics available and the chosen presenters.” John Steinhilber, U.S. Probation Officer, Miami, FL.

 

 

COMMENTS FROM OTHERS:

“I like the location of the conference, and the variety of choices given.” Marcial Perez, Pleasant Hills, Iowa.

 

“All of the work shops that I attended were very informative & applicable to the work that I am involved in.Thomas Hurley, Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy, Chicago, IL.

 

“Excellent Information!”. Robert Brzenchek , Douglasville, PA.

 

“NGCRC is something I look forward to every year, and every time I come to this conference, it exceeds my expectations.” Kristopher B.E. Hansgen, Gang Specialist, St. Joseph, MN.

 

“Wonderful Networking opportunity with people all over the world”. Stacia Potorff, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO.

 

“It was very pleasant to hear a combination of academics & real world practitioners on gang activities.” Carlos Hernandorena, Falls Church, VA.

 

“Best training I’ve been to. I learned so many new things both professionally & personally. It energized me & makes me excited be part of this field!” and “Thank you!”. Mallory Fuchs, Owatonna, MN.

 

“So many different class options...just about every aspect of "Gangs" were covered!”. Melissa Cordeiro, City of Tacoma, Tacoma, WA.

 

“Networking and having the ability to connect with other people in your field from other states. Finding out how they handle their gang issues and compare it to how my work handles it. The speakers were also outstanding!”. Kyra Luepke, Graduate Student, Prinsburg, MN.

 

“The Cyber Bullying gave essential information on the subject not only for my work but for my personal life with my 16 year old and red flags to pay attention to. Thank you!” and “Extremely Good Presenter!”. Debra A. Higens, Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy, Chicago, IL.

 

“The networking opportunities are excellent!”. Randall Strickland, Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy, Chicago, IL.

 

“A great opportunity to meet past colleagues and friends which provides the best circumstance to network and build professional ties.Dr. Andy Bain, University of Mount Union, Alliance, OH.

 

“Registration staff were wonderful.Mario Hesse, Professor, Dept. Of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

 

“Networking receptions are a great way to met others and decompress after absorbing a lot of information.James A Anderson, Deputy State Fire Marshall, Little Falls, MN.

 

“The presenters and materials were well organized, professional and interesting!”. April Lyskowsky, Lawrence Family Development & Education Fund, Lawrence, MA.

 

“Everything”. Carlos Collazo, Lawrence Family Development & Education Fund, Lawrence, MA.

 

“It was very informative and the networking was very good.William Rodriguez, Lawrence Family Development & Education Fund, Lawrence, MA.

 

“I enjoyed the excellent assistance received from student assistants and office staff. NGCRC staff did a great job.” Dr. Manuel R. Roman Jr., Sacramento, CA.

 

“By far an amazing training as always”. Deepa R. Patel, Springfield, VA.

 

 

COMMENTS FROM POLICE:

 

“I like the location of the conference, and the variety of choices given.” Marcial Perez, Pleasant Hills, Iowa. 

 

“Opportunities to network and gather info on gangs/issues across the country not just my region.” Kris Murphy, Salt Lake Area Gang Project, Salt Lake City, UT.

 

“Great Hotel!! Great networking with other gang detectives from across the country.” Det. Esekia Afatas, Salt Lake Area Gang Project, Salt Lake City, UT.

 

“I really appreciated the veterans reception. I thought it was a great idea and haven't been to anything similar in the past. The number of training options was great.Erin Nelson, Fairfax County Police Department, Springfield, VA.

 

“Enjoyed the "criminal mind and the gangster." I enjoyed the large number of offerings for training - the facility (hotel) was nice.Jesse Hambrick, Douglas County Sheriffs Dept., Douglasville, GA.

 

“Meeting new officers and investigators”. Officer Eric Scott, Shelby County Schools, Memphis, TN.

 

“Well organized, great staff and excellent presenters”. Constable Boris Sark, Victoria Police Department, Victoria, BC, Canada.

 

“The variety of classes, allowed me to try different areas of training that I never would have before.Anthony Caliendo, Deputy Sheriff, Lake County Sheriffs Office, Waukegan, IL.

 

“The volume of classes was nice to be able to choose from.Officer Michael R. Ball, Sonoma County Sheriffs Office, Santa Rosa, CA.

 

“Recognition of our nations vets and law enforcement’s fallen - networking with old friends and new contacts”. Fred Moreno, Chicago, IL.

 

“Great Topics”. Det. Christopher Ryan Geoghegan, Louisville Metro Police Department, Louisville, KY.

 

“There were great instructors”. Gary Hensler, Fort Wayne Police Department, Fort Wayne, IN.

 

“Networking”. Morris Franklin, Peoria Police Department, Peoria, IL.

 

“The workshops were great Dr. Todd Negola and Ken Davis were great”. Terrance Stone, Chairman, San Bernardino County Gangs & Drugs Task Force, San Bernardino, CA.

 

“Very informative, great venue”. Matthew Foote, Fort Wayne Police Department, Fort Wayne, IN. 

 

“The presenters for each class that I attended were very knowledgeable.Adele Gardner, Police Officer, Detroit Public Schools Police Department, Detroit, MI.

 

“The high level of specialists that were speakers.Dante A. Salinas, patrolman, Waukegan Police Department, Waukegan, IL.

 

“Wide range of topics from all across, United States.Det. Alan Beckman, Will County Sheriffs Office, Joliet, IL.

 

“Lots of great information”. Samer Kato, Macomb County Sheriffs Office, Mt. Clemens, MI.

 

“Really enjoyed Carter Smith, Todd Negola & Chris Przemieriecki Great speakers”. Stephen D. Stollar, Carroll County Sheriffs Office, Carrollton, GA.

 

“Extensive material”. Det. Michael Pivowar, Parke County Sheriffs Office, Rockville, IN.

 

“This was the first conference I have attended in my 9 years of law enforcement and it was a fantastic learning experience.” Justin J. Closen, Decatur Police Department, Decatur, IL.

 

“Great Instructors and Great Class Diversity and Selection”. Jason Danner Decatur Police Department, Decatur, IL.

 

“Ken Davis & Dr. Rush they were great.” Michael Deese, Douglasville County Sheriffs Office, Douglasville, GA.

 

“Wide range of information available.” Jacob Beck, Peoria Police Department, Peoria, IL.

 

“Tons of classes” and “Really enjoyed classes 64 & 20.” Marc Deshales, Ft. Wayne Police Department, Ft. Wayne, IN.

 

“I feel that my skills were expanded by attending”. Sgt. William Ceci Sr., Will County Sheriffs Office, Joliet, IL.

 

“The opportunity to listen to and learn from different specialists in gang investigations was great. Bringing different experiences and perspectives under one roof will elevate us all in the L.E. profession.” Marco A. Ayala, Lawrence Police Department, Lawrence, MA.

 

“NCIC class was great.” and “Most presenters seemed well organized & knowledgeable”. Officer Trent Howard, Portage Police Department, Portage, IN.

 

“Your not in the same class listening to the same instructor in the same room the whole time”. Michael Spence, Knoxville Police Department, Knoxville, TN.

 

“Well organized considering the amount of classes.” and “I really enjoyed class 102. The instructor was excellent”. Laura Lightfoot, Portage Police Department, Portage, IN.

 

“Training” and “Meeting Contacts From Over Country (Networking)”. Bryan Sylvester, Peoria Police Department, Peoria, IL.

 

“The conference provided a wealth of different subjects and expert presenters on those topics.” Robert Leman, Oakland County Sheriffs Office, Pontiac, MI.

 

“Presenters were very knowledgeable and informative.” John J. Grant, Indiana State Police, Ft. Wayne, IN.

 

“The amount of information”. Clint Fore, investigator, Biloxi Police Department, Biloxi, MS.

 

“Great instructors, great training.” Richard Hilliard, investigator, Biloxi Police Department, Biloxi, MS.

 

“The experience and good amount of knowledge.” Adam K. Siefman, Decatur Police Department, Decatur, IL.

 

“Variety of classes & fields.” Dustin Lind, Investigator, Lincoln Police Department, Lincoln, NE.

 

“The various classes and number of options for specialization”. Officer Lucas Liddle, Cedar Rapids Police Department, Cedar Rapids, IA.

 

“Presenters have a great passion for topics”. Det. Carlton Conway, Elkhart Police Department, Elkhart, IN.

 

“The Information!”. Keyon David Ashe, Department of Public Safety, Raleigh, NC.

 

“Excellent variety of classes and instructors.” Mark A. Taylor, Knoxville Police Department, Knoxville, TN.

 

“Networking and organization”. Chris Carter, FBI Federal Gang Task Force, Moline, IL.

 

“I enjoy how professional this conference is ran! Thank You!” and “I LOVE CHICAGO!”. Det. M. Santiago, Seattle Police Dept (Gang Unit), Seattle, WA.

 

“The instructors are very knowledgeable about what they are teaching.” Will Haley, Oakland County Sheriffs Office, Pontiac, MI.

 

“Freedom to choose my classes”. Michael Geddings, Knoxville Police Department, Knoxville, TN.

 

“The variety of courses & various times available to attend the classes made it possible to attend the classes I wanted !!!” and “Thank You!!”. Robert T. Sevaaetasi, Gang Unit, Seattle Police Department, Bellevue, WA.

 

“Learned a lot of new and useful information.” Shalandra Burch, Department of Juvenile Justice, Chicago, IL.

 

“The instructors were very knowledgeable.” Brandon Singleton, Salt Lake Area Gang Project, Salt Lake City, UT.

 

“The NGCRC staff. Good communication with attendees.” Lt. William Loescher, Puyallup Tribal Police Department, Puyallup Tribee of Indians , Tacoma, WA.

 

“Getting to network with officers from around the country!”. Det. Juan Gonzalez, Douglasville Police Department, Douglasville, GA.

 

“Diversity of Education”. Benjamin A. Tobey, Portage Police Department, Portage, IN.

 

“The networking, resources learned. Also good updates since the last time I was here.” Ben Durian, Wyoming Department of Public Safety, Wyoming, MI.

 

“The variety of speakers, topics, & classes.” Jason Caster, Wyoming Department of Public Safety, Wyoming, MI.

 

“The speakers were very educated and professional, but kept the information unfiltered.” Jelani Coppage, Wyandotte County Sheriffs Office, Kansas City, KS.

 

“Many of the presenters were very knowledgeable, and had a great intel of the information they presented.” Adrienne D. Gilchrist, Wyandotte County Sheriffs Office, Kansas City, KS.

 

“I really enjoyed interacting with people of different agencies and backgrounds to learn about different gang problems & techniques”. Mark Boudreau, Flint Police Department, Flint, MI.

 

“Todd Negola is a phenomenal speaker, very interesting & keeps audience engaged”. Officer Sean McCoy, North Aurora Police Department, North Aurora, IL.

 

“Staff and presenters were very informative and helpful. Hotel was great and very clean. It was great networking with LEO’s from all over country”. Officer David Parr, North Aurora Police Department, North Aurora, IL.

 

“A large choice of courses.” Robert G. Rose, Knoxville Police Department, Knoxville, TN.

 

“Several quality speakers presented new ideas and concepts I can take back to my department.”and “The networking reception & complimentary cubs ticket are always a plus!”. Thomas W. Epps, Knoxville Police Department, Knoxville, TN.

 

“The ability to network with other law enforcement officers that can assist with investigations and issues that are entering in Canada.” Constable David Jorgensen, Victoria Police Department, Victoria, BC, Canada.

 

“I liked being able to choose which classes to attend. Great variety.” Shauna K. Spurgess, FBI, Detroit, MI.

 

“The amount of seminars”. Joe Piscitelli, Rosemont Police Service, Rosemont, IL.

 

“Wide range of topics covered”. Anthony DiIacova, Rosemont Police Service, Rosemont, IL.

 


 

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 Statistical Evaluation Results from the

2015 NGCRC Training Conference:


INTRODUCTION

            The 2015 Eighteenth International NGCRC Gang Specialist Training Conference was held during August 10-12, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. The statistical evaluation results are reported here from the large number of persons attending the conference who provided such evaluation surveys. What this documents is an amazing level of “success” as measured in terms of the satisfaction of those who attended.

            The bottom line finding here is that the NGCRC offers training that is consistently rated as exceptional in value and quality.


THE NGCRC ATTRACTS THOSE WITH AND WITHOUT PRIOR TRAINING ON GANGS

            One statistical result from the evaluation forms completed by those attending the 2015 NGCRC training conference reveals the NGCRC attracts those with and without prior training in gangs. The question on the evaluation form was “Have you received training at other gang seminars?“ In fact, for 2015 some 48.5 percent indicated that they had not previously received any training about gangs. Thus, some 51.5 percent of those attending the NGCRC training conference indicated that they had in fact been previously trained on gangs.


FEW ARGUE WITH THE FACTS: THE NGCRC OFFERS MORE CHOICES THAN ANYONE ELSE

            One very powerful statistical result from the evaluation forms completed by those attending the 2015 NGCRC conference relates to the number of choices a person does or does not have in terms of different options for classes to attend. In some training programs there is no choice at all, or few or very limited choices. Some 97.5 percent of those attending the NGCRC 2015 conference reported that “the NGCRC had more choices for sessions”.


THE NGCRC ATTRACTS NEW AND REPEAT TRAINEES

            The NGCRC 2015 Evaluation Survey asked the trainees whether this was the first time they had attended an NGCRC conference. The question on the evaluation form was, “This is the first time I have ever attended one of the Gang Training Conferences by the NGCRC.” The results indicated that 72.9 percent of those attending the 2015 conference did so for the first time. In other words, a third (some 32.1 percent) of those who attended the 2015 conference did in fact have previous training at an official NGCRC training conference.


OVERWHELMING MAJORITY REPORT “BEST GANG TRAINING EVER”

            As a testament to the high quality of the training experience at the 2015 NGCRC training conference, another significant statistical result from the evaluation indicated an exceptionally high level of satisfaction with the training. Some 77.9 percent of those attending the conference reported that it was, “in my opinion, the best gang training event I have ever attended.” Such high levels of praise from people all over the USA and abroad are indeed hard to achieve.


ALMOST EVERYONE WANTS TO COME BACK NEXT YEAR

            Another measure of the validity of high levels of satisfaction among those attending the NGCRC’’s 2015 conference is found in the results to the question measuring intention to “come back next year”.

            The evaluation instrument included the following question: “I would like to attend the NGCRC 19th International Gang Specialist Training Conference that the National Gang Crime Research Center is currently planning. ___True ___False”.

            Some 89.8 percent of those who attended the 2015 conference indicated that they want to attend the 2016 conference as well.


ACHIEVING NETWORKING: A GUARANTEED RESULT AT THE NGCRC CONFERENCE

            Three separate evaluation questions addressed the issue of “networking” because this is always an important “added benefit” of any training, and it becomes particularly valuable as a resource when dealing with gang problems.

            The first question asked, “Did you meet any new gang specialists that you may be able to network with in the future while you were at this conference”. The results of the evaluation question about whether the participants at the 2015 NGCRC training conference were able to achieve networking showed an astounding 91.7 percent reported that they were able to achieve such networking while at the conference.

            The second question sought to establish a baseline for how important the factor of “networking” was to those attending the 2015 NGCRC conference. The second question therefore asked the participants “Was the opportunity to network with other gang specialists something that you wanted to achieve while at this conference?” Here we find that 93.2 percent indicated that networking was an important goal for them at the conference. Based on this, it is safe to say that everyone achieved their goal of networking at the 2015 NGCRC Training Conference.

            A number of specialized “networking receptions” were available to anyone who wanted to participate in these events during after hours. These are well planned and well managed events designed to enhance networking among professionals. Thus, a third and final question about networking in the evaluation survey asked, “Did you attend any of the special networking receptions?” Here we find that 55.6 percent attended one or more of these specialized reception events.


VERY HIGH LEVELS OF SATISFACTION WITH THE QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF TAKE HOME TRAINING MATERIALS

            The rating system used by the NGCRC to evaluate the performance of the trainers and presenters, as well as its own operations, utilizes a “scale” of values from an absolute low value of “zero” to indicate the low extreme of “not satisfied” to an absolute high value of ten (10) to indicate the high extreme of “very satisfied”. Thus, the “score” in such cases is easy to interpret: the higher the score, the higher the level of satisfaction.

            The “mean score” is what is used to calculate an overall score for performance. The mean is the arithmetic mean, a measure of central tendency in the data, and it is calculated by means of an SPSS analysis. SPSS is a statistical software package widely used in the social sciences and criminology.

            The evaluation form included the following question measuring the quality of materials: “How satisfied were you with the quality of the take home training materials provided to you?”. Each participant is provided with a “take home goody bag” that contains various printed training materials for future use. The results indicated a mean score of 7.49 on a zero to 10 point scale.

            A second question asked, “How satisfied were you with the quantity of take home training materials provided to you?” And here again a very high score emerges, a mean value of 7.58 was found for this factor.


MANY WON SOMETHING IN ONE OF THE RAFFLES

            There are various raffles at the NGCRC conference, some occur at the networking receptions and some are scheduled through the Operations Center.

            The evaluation form asked the conference participants, “Did you win anything in any of the raffles?” The results indicated that 44.8 percent of those attending the conference reported winning something in one of the raffles.


OVER A THIRD DID FIELD TRAINING OR BALLGAME

            The exit survey question in the evaluation form ask the attendees “did you go on any of the tours, ballgames, or ride-a-longs”? Some 35.3 percent of the attendees, over a third, indicated that in fact they had in face went on a tour, or attended an NGCRC sponsored ballgame event, or a ride-along.


HIGH LEVELS OF SATISFACTION WITH NGCRC STAFF

            The evaluation form included the question “How satisfied were you with the staff and volunteers of the National Gang Crime Research Center in terms of making your experience at the training conference a quality time?”. The results indicated a mean score of 8.67 on a scale between zero and ten, again a very high level of satisfaction with the NGCRC staff. The staff provide a number of useful functions to the conference participants, from security to equipment technician support.


NGCRC GUESTS OFTEN BRING ADDITIONAL FAMILY MEMBERS WITH THEM

            The NGCRC promises a “family friendly” environment for its conference participants and provided some special features in this regard (e.g., Family ID cards allowing them to take advantage of discounts at restaurants, etc in the area). The evaluation form asked “Did you bring other family members to Chicago this visit?” and the results indicated that 13.7 percent brought one or more other family members with to the conference. There was even a separate question asking attendees to “rate” the hotel, and they gave it very high marks, a mean score of 8.45 on a zero to ten rating scale is a very high level of satisfaction.


CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS GAVE “HIGH GRADES” TO THE NGCRC AS AN OVERALL EVALUATION RESULT

            Finally, another question on the evaluation form asked the 2015 NGCRC conference participants to “Give us your grade for how we did overall in trying to make this conference experience a good one for you. For a final grade, I give this conference an ___A ___B ___C ___D ___F.”

            The results indicated that most (48.5%) gave the NGCRC an “A”. An additional 41.8 percent gave the NGCRC a grade of “B”. Thus, 90.3 percent of the trainees rated the NGCRC training experience as an “A” or “B”, the highest possible grades. Again, from a different way of measuring the same thing (overall training experience), we find additional strong evidence of a high level of satisfaction among persons who attended the conference. A GPA of 3.36 (where 4=A, 3=B, 2=C,1=D,0=F) was the mean score from this analysis. Thus, conference attendees gave the NGCRC an overall grade of “A minus/B Plus” it would appear from the 2015 evaluation results: again, a remarkable achievement.


 

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WANT TO SEE MORE EVALUATIONS OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF NGCRC TRAINING? If Yes, Click Here.

 

 

Quotes From the 2015 NGCRC Conference Attendees:

Here is what attendees said about the 2015 NGCRC Training Conference (things they liked about the NGCRC conference):

 

            “Obtained some good information”. Daniel Duncan, Peoria Police Department, Peoria, IL.

            “Plenty of class choices and flexibility”. James E. Roy, Integrated Wellness Group, New Haven, CT.

            “The Brother Raymond speaker and Cabrini Green tour!”. Monica D. Lofton, CIRGV, Dayton, OH.

            “Amount of class / options”. Erin Barisch, Peoria Police Department, Peoria, IL.

            “This conference afforded me the opportunity to network with other professionals; as well as acquire new techniques for working with gang-affiliated youth. The NGCRC staff were very courteous and welcoming.” Jewel N. Jones, STG Coordinator, Ohio Dept. Of Youth Services, Cleveland, OH. 

            “Each instructor was extremely knowledgeable + passionate in their areas of study which made learning very enjoyable. I’ve been in policing for 14 years + learned things about gangs I haven’t learned before. I think having representation from so many diverse areas also assisted in bringing unique information to the seminar. I really had a great time.” Jennifer Marcellis, Sandwich Police Department, Wayne, IL.

            “The people, staff and attendees were awesome. Fred was wonderful and very passionate. I enjoyed the opportunity to network and meet new people.” Darrah M. Metz, Deputy Sheriff, Franklin County Sheriffs Office, Columbus, OH.

            “The networking was outstanding”. Christopher L. Mallette, Executive Director, Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy, Chicago, IL.

            “It was very informative. I really enjoyed it.” Frank Galley Jr., Integrated Wellness Group, New Haven, CT.

            “Networking”. Krista Coleman, Community Service Coordinator, Peoria Police Department, Peoria, IL.

            “Overall this conference is/was great (smiley face). I enjoyed my session. Conference staff was very kind and flexible to us. Great work NGCRC (smiley face). Anthony Hall, Pathways to Peace, Rochester, NY.

            “Well organized, very informational”. Allen Mitchell, Juvenile Justice Commission, Trenton, NJ.

            “Being able to network and learn new things. Learning about gangs, drugs and policing in other countries”. Kirk Turner, Cook County Juvenile Detention, Chicago IL.

            “Schedule was easy to follow”. Chris Stephens, Deputy, Multnomah County Sheriffs Office, Portland, OR.

            “The NGCRC brings presenters in from all around the country to share their knowledge that I feel helps me learn about different gangs/STG’s around the country that may end up in my area at some point. Most trainings I’ve been to are directed more toward basic gang identification and/or studies of gangs more common to my geographic area”. Sgt. Bobby Farley, Rutherford County Sheriffs Office, Murfreesboro, TN.

            “Interesting to hear what others around the country are doing with respect to prevention and intervention”. Rodney M. Evans, CEO, MAYS, Omaha, NE.

            “I enjoyed networking with so many people.” Earle Lobo, City of New Haven, Dept. Of Youth Services, New Haven, CT.

            “It was a unique experience in meetings and in sessions with both law enforcement officers and community organizations. It allowed me to hear and listen to their experience.” Christopher Jenkins, Irvington Police Dept., Irvington, NJ.

            “Networking, meeting like minded people.” Thomas Smith Sr., Summit County Juvenile Court, Akron, OH.

            “I appreciated the ability to network and interact with all the stakeholders that deal with gangs”. Sgt. James Chiola, Peoria Police Department, Peoria, IL.

            “I love to network & I was glad to meet new people & speak with different agencies”. Krystal Thomas, Watersloo, IA.

            “Very informative for me. Was able to learn new ways of working with our clients that are heavily gang affiliated”. Sylvia Rivera, Juvenile Probation Officer, Chicago, IL.

            “Networking and caring, creative people who are fighting the good fight for justice”. Marlon Shackleford, Human Relations Council, Dayton, OH.

            “I enjoyed all the instructors and training”. Sean Murray, Juvenile Justice Commission, Trenton, NJ.

            “Speakers were experts in their field. Classes offered before 8am and after 5pm”.Jerry Garza, Multnomah County Dept. Of Criminal Justice, Portland, OR. 

            “Big class selections”. Leticia Barrera, Juvenile Probation Officer, Chicago, IL.

            “Networking.” Billi Patzius, Lindenwood University, Wentzville, MO.

            “I learned a lot and was able to network with a lot of people”. Isaac Hunt Jr., Goodwill Industries, South Bend, IN.

            “The quantity & quality of the classes offered”. Emilio Mendoza, L.A. Impact, Commerce, CA.

            “The ability to communicate with investigators through out the country to receive real time data on trends, and operations of gangs nationwide”. Jarrett D. Parks, Shelby County Sheriffs Office, Memphis, TN.

            “Loved it, Dr. Knox even stated that he would offer his support regarding my Ph.D. dissertation. That meant a lot”. Stacey M. Jenkins, Indiana Technical University, Fort Wayne, IN.

            “Networking with other professionals”. Gregg Etter, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO.

            “I enjoyed all the wonderful speakers who shared their different gang expertise”. Willard A. Roberts, Juvenile Justice Commission, Trenton, NJ.

            “Invaluable information disseminated that can be taken back to my community to make a positive impact”. Robert Matthew Brzenchek, New Town, PA.

            “The networking, great speakers, very diverse, group from police, probation, non-profit outreach”. Darren Byrd, Omega CDC, Human Relations Council, Dayton, OH.

            “The diversity of the students attending”. Timothy D. Mayerbock, Illinois State Police, Desplaines, IL.

            “The gun running class was amazing”. Jason Mitchem, Bolingbrook Police Department, Bolingbrook, IL.

            “A lot of activities and class time that really fill up the entire span of time while we are here”. Sgt. Joshua Shaffer, Knoxville Police Department, Knoxville, TN.

            “Information was extremely relevant and something I can take back to my agency + make plans to implement immediately”. Kevin A. Shepherd, Training Coordinator, Ohio Department of Youth Services, Orient, OH.

            “Great experience”. Michael Brooks Sr., Pathways to Peace, Rochester, NY.

            “The conference is always a great experience with a great variety of information and people”. Kristopher Hansgen, St. Cloud State University, St. Joseph, MN.

            “The Mental Health First Aid Certification option was an incredible opportunity. All of the presenters were so willing to stay in contact in the future or share materials if appropriate”. Katelyn Regan, Renz Addiction Counseling Center, Elgin, IL.

             “Great participants. The student assistants were of great help. Good source for networking”. Manuel R. Roman, Jr., Brandman University, Sacramento, CA.

            “Greatly enjoyed Michael Nerheim & Dr. Manuel Roman’s presentations”. Johanna M. Almaraz.

            “Highly qualified professionals for all presentations”. Brad Robertson, Fairview Police Department - East Metro Gangs, Fairview, OR.

            “Great speakers”. James Carmody, Worcester Police Department, Worcester, MA.

            “Networking”. Captain Eric Decker, Detroit Police Department, Detroit, MI.

            “All of the different classes offered and the people I met from different departments”. Leslie Murphy, Hudson County Prosecutors Office, Jersey City, NJ.

            “Great presentations, great networking”. Duane L. Gordon, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.

            “There were some very interesting and relevant trainings available”. Jana L. Walker, Youth Rehabilitation and Treatment Center, Kearney, NE.

            “The staff is always helpful and attentive to our needs. There are so many people to network with”. Lt. Aaron Juenger, Mower County Police Reserves, Austin, MN.

            “Staff bent over backwards to help attendees with any problem”. Det. Jonathan Juenger (Ret.), Mower County Sheriffs Office, Austin, MN.

            “The 3-day training experience provides an opportunity to share gang-specific knowledge and skills with others. Therein, when others thank you for that and make you feel valued as an instructor, it is personally rewarding beyond any workplace monetary salary”. D. Lee Gilbertson, professor, Department of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            “Excellent new courses and wonderful presenters made this an amazing conference”. Stacia Pottoroff, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO.

            “The selection of classes and different topics revolving around the gang problems our communities face”. Det. Christopher Cavera, Will County Sheriffs Department, Joliet, IL.

            “Todd Negola - presentations were phenomenal. Det. Marc Vanek - Wonderful, took so much from class! All staff was extremely helpful & friendly. Thank you! Also really enjoyed Larry Parham & Deepa Patel”. Teri Schilling, Boonville County Juvenile Probation, Idaho Falls, ID.

            “The knowledge of all the trainers in all sessions”. Brian Atkins, FSFSC, Washington, DC.

            “The staff are pleasant & helpful. The receptions are a valuable networking tool. Sweets in the workshop rooms would be a nice bonus”. Thomas M. Hurley, Senior Project Manager, Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy, Chicago, IL.

            “Networking with gang investigators & researchers. The variety of classes”. Det. Kenneth A. Davis, Yonkers Police Dept., Yonkers, NY.

            “Crucial knowledge for police, corrections, educators, and concerned citizens”. John Douglas “A-Train” Atkisson, Vel R. Phillips Juvenile Justice Center, Milwaukee, WI.

            “Presenters, material + handouts were outstanding overall”. Randell Strickland, Assistant Project Manager, Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy, Chicago, IL.

            “The staff with NGCRC are great. This training sets the standard when it comes to gang training. Plus having the opportunity to network with gang professionals is extremely valuable. Will be back next year”. Christopher Calhoun, Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office, Noblesville, IN.

            “Meeting a lot of people from other agencies was very beneficial”. Shane Turley, Officer, Madison-Morgan Co. HIDTA.

            “The presenters were well informed & answered all the questions”. Chris Potter, Booneville Juvenile Probation, Idaho Falls, ID.

            “There were a wide variety of classes offered.” Jennifer Musselwhite, Assistant District Attorney, Office of the District Attorney, Hernando, MS.

            “Staff were very kind, organized. As always, great location”. Donna Moore-Brown, Kent County Sheriff’s Office, Grand Rapids, MI.

            “The variety of sessions and the presenters”. Bobby D. Johnson, Memphis Police Department, Memphis, TN.

            “Fred, Todd Negola, and networking is the highlights of this conference”. Shawn Short, deputy sheriff, Franklin County Sheriffs Office, Columbus, OH.

            “The number of classes to choose from was outstanding”. Jarrod Shaw, U.S. Probation, Albuquerque, NM.

            “Amazing presentations”. Carlos Martinez, Chicago, IL.

            “The amount of classes to choose from”. Christopher F. Connelly, Nebraska Department of Corrections, Tecumseh, NE.

            “This was my first gang training and I really enjoyed it. I’m hoping my employer will allow me and other members of my team to attend next year”. Keith Williams, Case Manager, Vandburgh County Treatment Court, Evansville, IN.

            “Very qualified instructors. Good mix of academics and real world experience”. Peter C. Franzen, Knoxville Police Department, Knoxville, TN.

            “Networking”, Peter Chambers, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.

            “Networking”, Nicholaus Lesch, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.

            “Meeting new participants and guests and helping them enjoy the conference as much as possible”. Edward Sanchez, NGCRC Staff Volunteer, Chicago, IL.

            “The networking, the city is great, Fred and the rest of the staff are doing great. Todd Negola to me is by far the single best presenter here. I hope if I come back next year is he is here again. Thank you.” Jonathan Stickel, Deputy Sheriff, Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, Columbus, OH.

            “The conference did a great job in having overall training in the area of working with gangs. Each training I found to provide insight into what I should be looking for or gave me a knowledge base to explain what I have noticed with my gang involved probationers to my organization and stake holders”. Kristi Bender, Specialized Probation Officer, Lancaster County Adult Probation, Lincoln, NE.

            “Variety of classes on location”. Dustin A. Lind, Lincoln Police Department, Lincoln, NE.

            “Appreciate the variety of talent, disciplines and topics represented by presenters!” Erin Nelson-Serrano, Program Director, Community Action Board, Watsonville, CA.

            “Chicago is a great place”. DeWayne McQueen, Deputy, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Portland, OR.

            “Conference had an extensive variety of classes to choose from. Instructors were well prepared”. James M. Crogan, Springfield Police Department, Springfield, MA.

            “Staff at the NGCRC was excellent”. Captain Clifford C. Duncan, Texas Department of Public Safety, Austin, TX.

            “I liked the wide range of topics as well as being involved with people in research, community fields, juvenile fields, corrections, etc”. Joseph A. Cole, South Bend Police Department, South Bend, IN.

            “Multiple instructors with a variety of field expertise & knowledge willing to go the extra mile to share information & skills. Todd Negola A+++!” Marshall M. Ellett, Caroline County Sheriff’s Office, Bowling Green, VA.

            “It was very well organized, informative & helpful”. Linda Torres, Social Services, Skokie, IL.

            “All of the presenters were professional and had current data and information about gangs and tips and tools to reduce gang influence in our schools and communities”. Scott Hatch, Penobscot Job Corps Center, Bangor, ME.

            “Networking”. Semantha Hepler, Abraxas Youth Center, South Mountain, PA.

            “Top notch and knowledgeable trainers!” Matthew L. Wilcox, Sault St. Marie, MI.

            “I really enjoyed the amount of different classes and the time length for the classes”. Sgt. John Pearce, Osceola County Sheriff’s Office, Kissimmee, FL.

            “I look forward to returning next year”. Nicole Embry-Heard, Cincinnati Job Corps, Cincinnati, OH.

            “Great networking. There is nothing like speaking to someone else in your field that deals with your same issues, but handles them differently”. Musa L. Eubanks, Esq., Director, Office of Community Relations, Upper Marlboro, MD.

            “As a first time attendee, I do feel like I was exposed to gang terminology and other related topics that I was unfamiliar with prior to attending the conference. Attending the conference has piqued my budding interest in learning more about gangs in general and in my jurisdiction”. Neshondria (Shon) Ellerby, Assistant District Attorney, District Attorney’s Office, Paqscagoula, MS.

            “Well organized”. Marc DeLuca, Detroit Police Department, Detroit, MI.

            “The ability to choose from a variety of sessions was fantastic, it allowed me an opportunity to sample a wide range of material you would not normally get during a traditional training class. I also enjoyed the ability to network with gang specialists in different disciples from around the country”. Sgt. Joseph J. Gorski, North Aurora Police Department, North Aurora, IL.

            “Great information & knowledgeable instructors. Approachable staff”. Mickey P. Brown, Cook County Sheriff’s Office, Fox Lake, IL.

            “A ton of good information, a lot to take back with us”. Cassy Poirier, Cook County Sheriff’s Office, Evergreen Park, IL.

            “Hearing so many other ideas about the topic of gangs, real emphasis on collaboration, a lot of networking”. Kevin Sinacore, Cook County Juvenile Probation, Westchester, IL.

            “The opportunity to learn about criminology & psychology - job related”. Diego R. Rodriguez, Juvenile Court Probation, Skokie, IL.

            “I appreciated the vast selection of topics and tracks. The experience, knowledge and expertise”. Anthony O. Townsend Sr., The Community Builders, Chicago, IL.

            “Session #98 - incredible work! The detail and insight on how to build a case via cell phone networks! Very timely topics - insight into the criminal mind & gang mentality”. Debra A. Higens, Project Manager, Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy, Chicago, IL.

            “Had some very good instructors, that were friendly and willing to answer your questions. Great location”. Brett Anderson, Bismarck Police Department, Bismarck, ND.

            “Very informative and networking capability. Plenty of interesting classes and a lot of knowledgeable instructors”. Candice M. Burns, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.

            “Quality presenters”. Steven Young, Police Officer, Decatur Police Department, Decatur, IL.

            “Lots of great information from experienced professionals”. John Towns, Worcester Police Department, Worcester, MA.

            “I enjoyed the knowledgeable instructors as well as networking with other gang investigators”. Colin Griffin, Aurora Police Department, Aurora, IL.

            “Overall very good”. Marek Grobla, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.

            “The ability to network with others”. James A. Anderson, M.S., Deputy State Fire Marshall, Little Falls, MN.

            “Speakers knowledgeable and very willing to help and talk”. Brian T. Bailey, Louisville Police Department, Louisville, KY.

            “I really enjoyed the training and networking opportunities that were available to me.” Kimberlin Gomez-Dew, Chicago, IL.

            “The wide variation of speakers and people present at the conference to meet”. Travis Norris, Orland Park, IL

            “Exceptional number + diverse program offerings. Great presenters. Tracks are geared for anyone that works with gangs”. Bruce Johnson, Nicasa Behavioral Health Services, Barrington, IL.

            “Hotel, rooms were very nice. Great venue. McConnell + Nerheim were very good instructors”. Kevin R. Slavens, Police Officer, Peoria Police Department, Peoria, IL.

            “Great new session on the Russkaya Mafia by Dr. Etter and Ms. Pottorff”. Fred Moreno, NGCRC Chicago.

            “The opportunity to actually attend also it is a great networking experience”. Nicole A. Jungnickel, Coleta, IL.

            “All gang identification classes / tattoo information – law enforcement reception, was very nice”. Amy Mayer, Macomb County Sheriff’s Office, Mt. Clemens, MI.

            “Todd Negola/James Duffy/Jason Wilke were dynamic + informative. The information + research they shared I found invaluable”. Det./Sgt. Melissa Stevens, Macomb County Sheriff’s Office, Mt. Clemens, MI.

            “I had a nice time meeting new people and networking”. Sheila Bethea, Juvenile Justice Commission, Trenton, NJ.

            “Good presenters and viable information that will definitely help my job”. Sherell Taylor-Page, Los Angeles County Probation, Los Angeles, CA.

            “The how to section of #114 was very helpful. I was fortunate to attend many classes where the instructors were facing the same issues that my city is facing. They had several ideas and protocols that helped them, that would also benefit us”. Crystal Thomas, Evansville Police Department, Evansville, IN.

            “The variety of training options. It was easier to find sessions than it was my 1st year. Thanks for putting them on the back of our ID (badge)”. Jason L. Smith, Investigator, District Attorney’s Office, Pascagoula, MS.

            “Loved the variety of different backgrounds that come to conference”. Coqui Baez, Analyst, DHS I&A, Washington, DC.

            “Variety of classes taught by a variety of people with different experiences”. Joseph Villamonte, Lincoln Police Department, Lincoln, NE.

            “Great experience so many choices to choose from. You can “a’ la carte” your own training curriculum allowing yourself to target a specific area of interest”. Det.William Felt, Jr., Astabula City Police, Astabula, OH.

            “Excellent drug related classes this year”. Douglas E. Copeland, Police Officer, Smyrna Police Department, Smyrna, GA. 

            “Knowledgeable speakers”. Scott Jones, Macomb County Sheriff’s Office, Mt. Clemens, MI.

            “Very structured”. Tracey Miller, Detroit Police Department, Detroit, MI.

            “Everyone was knowledgeable on the material, friendly, broad variety of classes”. Det. Ryan Malone, Covington Police Department, Covington, KY.

            “The selection and variety of courses was awesome. Great staff”. Mark Alexander, Analyst, DHS I&A, Washington, DC.

            “Excellent networking experience. I have met people who have helped me from other jurisdictions”. Det. Gregrey Andrews, Covington Police Dept., Covington, KY

            “The variety of the classes were impressive”. Sgt. Jerry King, Madison-Morgan County HIDTA, Huntsville, AL.

            “Relevant information. Nice staff and instructors”. Aaron Watkins, Peoria Police Department, Peoria, IL.

            “This training raises everyone who attends game in combating gangs in their communities”. Larry Parham, Sedalia Police Department, Sedalia, MO.

            “I enjoyed the event @ the Cubs game (really nice people but nobody near LA, CA where I am from). I liked the Mental Health First Aid course & I feel I can use it. Presenter Deepa Patel was great @ her subject matter”. Erasmo Aguilar, DEC Supervisor, LA Impact, Commerce, CA.

            “For this being my first experience I was beyond impressed with this training. The information presented, given, and learned was very beneficial. I was able to network with other agencies, programs, and businesses. You never reach the point where you know everything, we learn something everyday and I definitely learned a lot at this training”. Eddie Collins, Childrens Home Association of Illinois, Peoria, IL.

            “The presenters were very knowledgeable about their specific areas. It was great networking with other officers from around the nation”. Tyler McDowell, Deputy Sheriff, Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, Columbus, OH.

            “It provided information on various aspects of gangs and gang investigations”. Andrea Testa, U.S. Probation & Pretrial Services, Nashville, TN.

            “Very diverse selection of sessions to attend. Great information and format”. Sharon McBride, Director, St. Joseph’s County Community Corrections, South Bend, IN.

            “All of the options for different training + different presenters. Location was perfect. Cubs game very nice”. Jason Caster, Officer, Wyoming Police Department, Wyoming, MI.

            “Very diverse + wide variety of sessions to attend”. Kelli Duimstra, Officer, Wyoming Police Department, Wyoming, MI.

            “Once again, the training far exceeded any other gang training I have ever received, including other national conferences”. Mike O’Brien, Quad City Gang Task Force, Moline, IL.

            “Networking and variety of knowledge/experience”. David Bartlett, Police Officer, Smyrna Police Department, Smyrna, GA.

            “I really enjoyed the wide variety of classes and the flexibility to pick and choose, to come and go from many different classes. I enjoyed all the speakers who have many years of experience, as a cop with 2.5 years on I really appreciate hearing from the guys who have been around for awhile”. Douglas Brickner, East Moline Police Department, East Moline, IL.

            “All of the different options for classes & the opportunity to earn a certificate. Additionally, all of the instructors were very knowledgeable in their respective fields”. Leigh Ann Davidson, U.S. Probation & Pretrial Services, Nashville, TN.

            “All presenters did good work and kept it interesting”. Zach Johnson, New Prague, MN.

            “The presenters seemed very knowledgeable and charismatic”. Adriana Lara, U.S. Probation & Pretrial Services, Nashville, TN.

            “Getting to network with professionals in this field betters my ability to gain knowledge on the streets back home”. William Woodward, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Omaha, NE.

            “You truly get different perspectives”. Nathan Thorn, Boulder County Juvenile Assessment Center, Boulder, CO.

            “Good presenters, willing to speak after sessions. 4 hour session was awesome felt like 2!! (smiley face)”. Joy M. Jefferson, City of Rochester, Pathways to Peace, Rochester, NY.

            “Good group of overall speakers”. Scott Britnell, Special Agent, Illinois State Police, Rockford, IL.

            “The number of sessions and ability to sample different courses was great”. Edwin Lee, Jr., Juvenile Justice Commission, Trenton, NJ.

            “The diversity of subject matter was helpful”. Andrew Boatman, Knoxville Police Department, Knoxville, TN.

            “A lot of options”. Det. Joe Piscitelli, Rosemont Public Safety, Rosemont, IL.

            “Lots of speakers to select & attend”. Det. Thomas Doulas, Rosemont Public Safety, Rosemont, IL.

            “The experience the presenter had on the subjects they presented”. Michael Basile, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.

            “It is always like come home. Friendly, caring NGCRC staff & trainers are awesome. Most make learning new things fun”. Jody Simmonds-Brooks, Puyallup Tribe Community Family Services, Tacoma, WA.

            “The amount of knowledge, training and networking gained at the NGCRC gang specialist training is second to none. Getting all asepects related to gangs makes this training very well rounded overall”. Kyle Dombrowski, South Bend Police Dept., South Bend, IN.

            “Great speakers. Especially Todd Negola”. Bob Morris, Assistant District Attorney, Office of the District Attorney, Hernando, MS.

            “Networking”. John A. McGuire, Palm Beach Sheriff’s Office, West Palm Beach, FL.

            “Different variety of classes, provided a diversity of knowledge and information to bring and utilize back on the job”. Joseph Flores, Glendale Heights, IL.

            “Knowledge! There are few conferences in which you actually have that light bulb go on (hand drawn symbol of light bulb glowing). This is one of them in which the bulb goes on and stays on the entire conference”. Sean Thompson, Quad City Gang Task Force, Moline, IL.

            “This was a very beneficial training conference for me. I didn’t know what to expect when I signed up. But I am glad I did. This is by far one of the best trainings I have ever attended. The information provided and presented was great. The ability to network was a bonus. I have made some very beneficial network connections. If anyone hasn’t attended this conference I strongly recommend they attend. This training conference is definitely an opportunity of a lifetime”. Shay Weldy, Childrens Home Association of Illinois, Peoria, IL.

            “It’s great hearing from people all across the country. You learn a little something different from everyone”. Paul R. Girskis, F.B.I. Quad City Gang Task Force, Moline, IL.             “Networking”. Kristina Veruchi, New Milford, IL.

            “The classes were very educational”. Jacob Day, Lawndale, IL.

            “Very informative and relevant information”. Laminta Poe, U.S. Probation & Pretrial Services, Nashville, TN.

 

 

 

 

 

List of the possible "Tracks" for 2018:

A "track" is an area of expertise. Think of it as a kind of "major" in college. For example, if you pick the track "Gang Prevention Skills", then you need to spend atleast four (4) hours of your 24 hours of training in courses or sessions that give session credit for "Gang Prevention Skills". A "track" is a specific topical area of study and concern in the world of the gang specialist. Here is a complete list of the "tracks" that are offered for training by the NGCRC.

(1) Gang Crime Investigation Skills Track

(2) Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole Track

(3) Gang Homicide Investigation Skills Track

(4) Gangs and Drugs Track

(5) Gang Problems in K-12 Schools Track

(6) Gangs and Organized Crime

(7) Gangs and Mental Health Track

(8) Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills Track

(9) Gang Internet Investigation

(10) Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services Track

(11) Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills Track

(12) Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists

(13) Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence Track

(14) Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills Track

(15) Motorcycle Gangs (restricted: for Criminal Justice Personnel only)

(16) Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities

(17) Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators

(18) Gang Counseling Skills Track

(19) Advanced Gang Identification

(20) Gang Profile Analysis Track

(21) Gang Prosecution Track

(22) Gang Prevention Skills Track

(23) International and Transnational Gang Problems Track

(24) Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs Track

(25) Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs Track

(26) Female Gangs/Female Gang Members.Track

(27) Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising Skills Track

(28) Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping Track

(29) Gangs and the Mass Media Track

(30) Graffiti Identification and Analysis

(31) Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention Track

(32) Dealing With Military Trained Gang Members

 

 

You can always wait until July 15, 2018 to actually declare your track; just mark on your form "TBA" to be announced; TBPL to be picked later; and after registering we will send you a form that allows you to make your decision at a later date.



THRASHER AWARDS:

A Call for Nominations

The Thrasher Award is named in honor of Frederic Milton Thrasher, the 1927 author of the classic study of Chicago gangs, who generated the first social scientific analysis of gangs. Some say he started a new field of study: gangology.


Thrasher is known for his book The Gang: 1,313 Gangs in Chicago. Some copies of this book may be given away free of charge in one of the raffles at the 2017 Conference: in one of the “door prize drawings”.


 The Thrasher Awards recognize outstanding contributions in research, scholarship, service, leadership, and other related accomplishments in dealing with the gang problem.


If you know someone who has achieved something outstanding in this area, then please send your nominations to: The 2017 Thrasher Awards Committee, National Gang Crime Research Center, P.O. Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468.

 

The policy of the NGCRC is to provide complete and absolute identity protection to those who would want to nominate someone for a Thrasher Awards. The identity of a person or organization that would nominate someone for a Thrasher Award is therefore protected by this explicit written policy of the NGCRC. We will not reveal this information to recipients, it is considered confidential information. But by the same token, the NGCRC cannot accept "anonymous nominations".


As a general guideline, for "how to prepare" a nomination: one cover letter, and then whatever attachments you feel are necessary to support the nomination. Attachments can include: statements or letters from others, corroborating the nomination, newspaper coverage, any forms of documentation that can support the nomination.


Thrasher Awards will be made at NGCRC's 2018 Twenty First International Gang Specialist Training Program for persons who have made outstanding contributions in research, scholarship, service, leadership, and other accomplishments in dealing with the gang problem. These Awards cannot be made in absentia.

 

            Thrasher Awards are made on-site during the Conference in a special ceremony. These awards cannot be made in absentia. Awards ceremony time and date (during the 2017 Conference in Chicago, 7:00 am Opening Ceremony for the Conference), scheduled for Monday, 7:00am, August 6, 2018. Recipients must be seated in the front row area. Arrive just before 7am and check in with the staff in front, tell them you are an Award Recipient.

 

Preliminary List of Thrasher Award Recipients for 2018:

 

TBA

 

 

Why the NGCRC has continued to set the "Gold Standard" for Gang Training:

            The National Gang Crime Research Center (NGCRC) has pioneered the field by first of all being producers of gang knowledge, publishing and disseminating useful information recognized at the highest levels of the social scientific community. Additionally, the NGCRC has a long track record of service (1990 to present) to law enforcement and correctional agencies nationwide in the goal of reducing gang violence. The research and intelligence analysis developed by the NGCRC over the years, and published in its scholarly journal, the Journal of Gang Research (now in its 25th year of publication), is of great practical value for gang investigators in law enforcement and STG coordinators in the field of corrections. Gang investigators at all levels of government, here and abroad, as well as gang/STG experts in corrections who attend the NGCRC training conferences have clearly made their views known that the NGCRC training is the best in regard to offering high quality practical choices. Police and corrections experts teach a variety of courses at the NGCRC training conference.

         The NGCRC, unlike other gang training groups, has a high level of transparency. The NGCRC provides a enormous amount of information about all details of the training conference. A lot of work goes into providing attendees with voluminous information about every aspect of the conference: from information about the trainers, to the descriptions of courses, to the tours, receptions, and special networkng events. The NGCRC even provides a preliminary schedule of events months before the actual training date, so that an attendee can literally "map out" and create an full personlized training experience by picking and choosing what to attend in advance. The NGCRC model illustrates a high level of professionalism.

      The NGCRC training conference is specifically designed to “train the trainer”: someone who completes the training will be able to return to their police department or institution equipped to train others. Investigators return with a wealth of printed information, and lots of new “networking contacts”: persons to call upon in the future.

 

 

   

GOOD TO VERIFY IF YOU ARE ACTUALLY REGISTED FOR THIS CONFERENCE:

 It is good to verify it if you think you are registered for this conference and if you have not received what is called a "Confirmation of Conference Registration" letter from the NGCRC.

  

The NGCRC sends out a "registration confirmation" to everyone who is actually registered for the conference. This letter documents what training track you may have signed up for, and can also serve as a receipt for payment of conference fees.

 

So if you think you are registered and you have not received a "Registration Confirmation", then you may want to use a VERIFY MY REGISTRATION FORM. This form can be faxed or mailed in to the NGCRC and we will be able to promptly verify back to you if you are or are not registered. Please no phone or email inquiries: we need it in writing.

 

This procedure is particularly helpful if your agency has "dropped the ball" in terms of getting the registration form/payment mailed off to the NGCRC.

 

You would not be eligible to register for the conference if you cannot sign the Policy statement on the regular NGCRC registration form; as a long standing rule, we do not allow journalists or defense attorneys because of the disruptive chilling effect they have. This is a mostly police conference: no one is authorized to take photographs or digitital recordings of any kind at the NGCRC conference, it is simply true that we get a lot of undercover detectives who deserve to have their privacy protected. We do not allow researchers to attend the Conference with the intent to use the attendees as informal or qualitative "data".

 


The Verify My Registration Form

 

Name:_______________________________________________________________________________________

 

Mailing address:________________________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________________________

 

City, State, Zip:________________________________________________________________________________

 

Fax my confirmation back to me at this fax number: Area Code:________ Fax Number:__________________________

 



PROCEDURE FOR REGISTERING BY MEANS OF A PURCHASE ORDER

This explains the new streamlined policy and procedure for persons from government agencies who seek to register for the 2017 NGCRC Training Conference by means of a Purchase Order or related type of procurement method. There are three main provisions of this policy and procedure and they are as follows:

1. A purchase order number must be provided on the form used by the Agency, and it must bear a signature. It should reflect that the payee will be the NGCRC and the form should also reflect the specific amount payable to the NGCRC (call if you have any questions in this regard). Please provide any special billing information (e.g., who specifically we should make the Invoice out to and where specifically we should mail the Invoice to).

2. Fax your registration forms and the Purchase Order to the NGCRC ASAP. The NGCRC fax number is (708) 258-9546. After faxing it in, simply complete the registration form and attach a purchase order and mail it in ASAP to: National Gang Crime Research Center, 2018 Conference Processing Center, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468. We do need it faxed and mailed as well. Please note that the deadline for Purchase Orders faxed to the NGCRC is July 30, 2018 (unless you call and obtain exemption from this deadline). Please note that the NGCRC will not accept “onsite” registrations by means of oral declarations that “my agency is going to pay for it”, and will not accept on-site purchase orders. If you are planning to pay by means of Purchase Order, then it must be done before the conference.

 3. Upon receipt of the registration form(s) and the purchase order form (or a letter head version) the NGCRC will register the persons(s) and issue their agency an Invoice. At the same time, the NGCRC will send individual letters confirming the registration to those persons. There are no “on-site” registration options for payment by means of a Purchase Order.


Those registering by means of a Purchase Order or if paying by a credit card can simply fax in their registrations, the fax number for the NGCRC is (708) 258-9546.

 

THE TRAINING SCHEDULE:

 The training schedule is as follows:

August 5 (Sunday), 2018: You can register from 3:00pm to 10:00pm, pick up your badge and bag of goodies.

August 6 (Monday), 2018: Opening day begins 7am with an Official Welcoming Ceremony. Classes begin at 8:00am. And continue into the night.

August 7 (Tuesday), 2018: early riser sessions begin 6am; regular sessions begin 8am and continue into the night.

August 8 (Wednesday), 2018: early riser sessions begin 6am; regular sessions begin 8am, and terminate at 5:00p.m. You must pick up your certificates before 6:00pm.

 Note: we provide early morning sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday; we provide noon sessions; and we provide early evening sessions on Mon. And Tues. Evenings — this "extra credit" allows persons to accumulate 24 hours of training by using the “customized schedule”, and by accumulating four hours out of the regular schedule allows you to leave at noon on Wednesday (giving you much flexibility on airline schedules for departing Chicago on Wednesday). These "early morning sessions" begin at either 6am or 7am; the evening courses begin at 5pm and can go up till 10pm if we need to. Thus, when you complete your 24 hours, you are eligible to depart with your certificates. Clothing suggestion: business casual.


An Option for 2018: The Double Major


(Signing Up for Two Tracks)


 The NGCRC has had repeated requests for this over the years, the idea of having a "double major": i.e., to be able to sign up for two (2) different specialty track areas. The benefit, of course, is that such a "double major" would result in two different specialty track certificates: one certificate for each of the two tracks.


The NGCRC is pleased to announce that the double major option is now available and it is described here.


Q: What does it mean to have a double major?


A: All it means is you can have two "tracks"; you have to log in a minimum of four hours in each of the two specialty areas.


Q: How many certificates do I get if I am registered for non-certification?


 A: None.


 Q: How many certificates do I get if I registered for certification?


 A: Two: one for your program of study reflecting the completion of the 2018 program consisting of 24 hours of training, and one for your specialty area. Previously in history people attending the conference could only have one track.


 Q: If I sign up for the Double Major or "two track option", how many certificates will I get?


 A: Three: your basic 24 hour program completion certificate, and then one each for each of the two (2) different tracks.


Q: How much does it cost to sign up for the Two Track Option?


 A: $90.00 if paid before July 1st; $105 if paid on or after that or onsite.


Q: What if there is a scheduling conflict and I discover at the conference I cannot accumulate the minimum number of hours in one of the two tracks?


A: We will refund your Two Track Option amount in full, no problem; and return you to the one track registration mode of your choice.


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The Two Track Sign Up Form



Print Name:____________________________________________________



Address:______________________________________________________



City, State, Zip:_________________________________________________



Print name of 2nd Track here:_______________________________________



Enclose $90.00 check or money order made payable to the National Gang Crime Research Center, and mail to: NGCRC, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990.


If paying on or after August 1, 2018 please note that the fee increases to $105.


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GOT QUESTIONS: Call the NGCRC at (708) 258-9111


 


The "Added Value" of NGCRC Training:


 The added value of NGCRC training is easy to explain and it is designed to be different than other groups who sponsor such training conferences: you get more for your money. You see that reflected in the evaluation results from previous NGCRC Conferences. Other people "copy" what we do, or they try to. But you can do a quick check of facts here: who else offers as many different sessions or courses than the NGCRC? It is such a huge and massive undertaking, that persons who attend this conference benefit from the very factor of "diversity" in the choices they have --- what they want to learn, what instructors they want to learn from, etc


First, all NGCRC trainees are given a wealth of high-quality take home printed training materials. The value of these books, reflecting the official books and journals from the NGCRC and related topics of interest about gangs, is itself a value comparable to the price of training itself. Most gang training programs provide a small amount of take-home written training materials, while the NGCRC provides an abundance of high-quality written take-home training materials. All persons attending the conference receive a "bag of goodies" which includes these kinds of useful written take-home training materials.


Secondly, no other training organization in the world provides the large variety of training options that the NGCRC provides; the NGCRC brings in more trainers and provides, therefore, more "choices" to trainees. NGCRC provides a large professional training experience in an environment designed for training. For example in the 2017 Conference there were over one hundred and thirthy different sessions. Typically, gang conferences offer a small selection of training options. So if you think a variety of choices is a good thing, then you need to attend our training conference.


 Thirdly, the NGCRC training is designed to produce "trainers": trainees who attend and complete the training typically return to their respective jurisdictions with an incredible new arsenal of training tools to train others in the field. You will get new and useful gang information at our 2018 Training Conference.


 Fourthly, the NGCRC training includes social opportunities that are structured to enhance the ability of the trainee to network with others in the field at a national and international level.



BENEFITS OF ATTENDING THE 2018 NGCRC TRAINING CONFERENCE:


 You have the power to "choose" what you want to learn. You have the right to "major in" what area of specialization or concentration you are interested in. Our conference provides an incredible array of different professional gang training sessions that trainees can make up their own minds what they want to attend. This is not the "one size fits all" model of training where every trainee attends each of a small limited number of training sessions and every trainer works all day to give the same talk three or four times. Our training program provides what we think people really want: the freedom to choose what kind of training they want from an incredible list of available choices. If you wanted a "Crash Course" on gangs, then this would be it.


 There has never been a gang training conference where people can "specialize" in a wide variety of areas of expertise. So the 2018 NGCRC Gang Training Conference really is a "history making event". It allows persons to network with others in their special area of interests and it has the organizational strength of much diversity among the trainers. It also has curriculum materials that are truly "cutting-edge". No one else promises you NETWORKING RESULTS. We do, based on previous performance.


 Obviously, no single person could ever attend each and every one of the many different sessions that will be available for the 2018 NGCRC 21st International Gang Specialist Training Program: one person has only 24 hours to spend in classroom training. There may be six or more different "sessions" being taught at the same time: you can only be in one place at one time. So make your session choices wisely by studying the huge curriculum.

 

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION OPTIONS:


 Trainees can register for Non-Certification or they can register for Certification. Both of these registration options are explained below.


 Non-Certification: This option is for those who do not need a transcript to be maintained of their training experience and who do not desire a high quality certificate in an upward path of gang specialist training. This option is best for those who just want to attend, get the training materials, and be free to come and go as they wish. Trainees are eligible to receive 24 hours of on-site training during the conference. Please note that if you register for non-certification you do not receive any certificates of your training. Non-certification trainees do receive the same high quality set of take home training materials as those who register for Certification. Persons registering for non-certification are allowed to "upgrade" their registration to Certification; please inquire in writing about this procedure.


 Certification: The certification is provided by the National Gang Crime Research Center, the premier gang research organization in the world, founded in 1990 it publishes the only professional international refereed journal about gangs (the Journal of Gang Research), it does extensive research on gangs, and it has a strong positive track record for providing high quality training on gang issues. TheJournal of Gang Research has 25 years of gang research publishing experience and as the Official Publication of the NGCRC it is abstracted in the Psychological Abstracts, Criminal Justice Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, Social Service Abstracts, and other international organizations that recognize professional journals. For more information about the accomplishments of the NGCRC, see its webpage information (www.ngcrc.com). The NGCRC was given much positive attention in the November/December 2002 (No. 67) National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) Catalog, U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs as a source of useful information on gangs (pp. 15, 17; this is not "advertising", because the NGCRC reports it recommended at our Web site were not government-funded and the NGCRC is not government funded, thus it is simply achieved positive recognition.

 

 There are a number of different choices for a person seeking certification. You must select ONE of these areas of specialization for your own designated track when you register for certification.


When you register for certification, you select one "track" as your primary interest area. Your "track" is like your "major" in college. You must spend at least four hours in sessions designated for your "track". The other 20 hours of training are "electives": spend that time in any session you want to attend.


When you register for certification you receive two professionally printed color certificates of high display quality reflecting your training. One of these certificates reflects the completion of the 2018 Training Program (acknowleging you have completed 24 hours of training while in Chicago); and the second certificate reflects your specialized training in your chosen track area (acknowledging that you have completed a minimum of four hours of training in this track area). Those registering for non-certification do not receive such certificates.

 

The certificate we offer is designed for the gang specialist. The gang specialist is a person who works in the fields of expertise in the track areas and who deals in some way with the gang problem. The certificate we offer is not designed for the general public as a route to being employed in any of these track areas. The NGCRC training is not like the "Gangs 101" training offered by a local police or corrections training academy. The NGCRC training is more cerebral, it is more appreciative of criminological research and it is recognizes that sworn personnel can integrate with civilian specialists in the learning environment. The NGCRC does not solicit attendance from the general public. Rather the NGCRC explicitly reaches out to those persons working in a variety of professions that deal with the gang problem (law enforcement, county jail, county adult and juvenile probation officers, state prison and parole staff, prosecutors, public school safety/SRO staff, etc.

 

While there is no educational requirement or prerequisite to receive NGCRC training, the NGCRC does not promise that by receiving its certificates that it would be a key to the door of a job in any profession. Mostly professionals attend NGCRC training, people with college degrees of some sort. We get a number of Ph.D.'s who attend the training. And of course we receive a number of people with less than two years of college or university training. There is much occupational and educational diversity among the trainees who attend the NGCRC training conference. Our ideal trainer is not just a published professional, but also a pioneer and recognized leader in his/her field.

 

Some Q & A About the NGCRC Gang Training Conference:

 

Q: I see a lot of your presenters have Ph.D.'s or are lawyers with the JD degree, do you have to have a graduate degree to teach for the NGCRC?

A: No, but we prefer that our presenters be published professionals. The NGCRC recruits presenters who are highly qualified to speak to whatever subject matter their presentation focuses on.

Q: What distinguishes the NGCRC from other providers of gang training services?

A: The NGCRC has over 20 years of service to the American criminal justice system (law enforcement, adult and juvenile corrections, prosecution, probation, etc); the NGCRC has a legacy of carrying out large scale gang research projects of much import and usefulness to the criminal justice system and schools, communities; the NGCRC has a remarkable and unparalleled history of publishing and disseminating useful information about dealing with the gang problem through the Journal of Gang Research (the official publication of the NGCRC) and The Gang Specialist newspaper we distribute free of charge; the NGCRC has a high level of accountability, each attendee has a lengthy evaluation form which becomes the transcript and official record of their attendance at any NGCRC training event; there is an NGCRC management and planning committee that reviews these annual evaluations for the purpose of improving operations and for feedback to specific presenters (an SPSS statistical analysis is made of the evaluation data and presenter feedback is provided to presenters, while general feedback is reported in full at the NGCRC website); the NGCRC is highly organized and leaves little to chance, the most important functions at the NGCRC conference are directly supervised by NGCRC staff who are also on one of the Conference Management Committees, examples include the networking receptions which typically have the same experienced professional and courteous staff from one year to the next, this provides continuity in supervision over a span of years, so these NGCRC staff have no learning curve to face, they know what they are doing, and they know how to do it.

 

Q: Does the NGCRC Provide Any Help on Parking?

A: The NGCRC lacks that ability. Parking can cost over $72 day (overnight) if you park at the hotel. Fact: There is no cheap parking in Chicago. The NGCRC has no control or authority over parking costs in Chicago. Nor can the NGCRC endorse any of the number of different I-phone and Android apps (e.g., "spothero") that claim to find you and guarantee you affordable parking. The City of Chicago Parking Garages are known to have the most competitive rates. Good website to find parking as close as next door to the hotel at the Water Tower Place: www.chicagoparkingmap.com

 

Q: Any special advice for people who are considering making a presentation at the NGCRC Conference?

A: At the start of your session, right after giving the title slide to your Power Point presentation, give an OUTLINE slide. This way attendees will know what will and what will not be covered in your session. This way they cannot complain the title does not match your content. Beware of Receiving the Criticism that Your Title Does Not Match Your Session Content. Target harden your session against this potential criticism by having an outline that corresponds to the structure an content of your training goals. Consider putting handouts on a website or make available by request through email. A presenter could also insert the sentence at the end of his/her session: "Attendees at this session will be provided online access or an emailed version of the hand-outs shortly after the conference if they request it while attending the session and completing the sign-in sheet email-handout request form inside the presenters training room.

 

Q: How do I pick my courses, how do I pick what sessions I should attend?

A: You will have an evaluation form where you check off how much time you spent at the conference, and in which sessions. If you are registered for certification, then You need to log in (accumulate) four (N = 4) hours in your track area, and another 20 hours so that you have a total of N = 24 hours logged in during the three day conference. If you have a double major (two tracks), you need four hours minimum in each track, and then another 16 hours in any sessions you want to attend. The way to pick your classes is read the course listings (www.ngcrc.com/courses.html), you will notive that all sessions have a section called "Session Credits:" where the session lists the training tracks that it gives credit for. Look for sessions in your track area, you need a minimum of 4 hours in your track, the remaining 20 hours can be spent in your track or anywhere, it is your choice. You cannot attend all 100+ courses. You need to make a decision about what will help you the most. Do this by reading the session information (www.ngcrc.com/courses.html), then pick out 24 hours or so that you want to attend. Then go to the schedule and see if this works: www.ngcrc.com/schedule.html. If two of your choices are being taught at the same time, you have to pick one of them: most of the sessions or courses to not "repeat". You may need to go back to the session description information (www.ngcrc.com/courses.html) and pick a different session. Then check the schedule until you know you have a schedule that works for you.

 

CERTIFICATION UPGRADE:


 This is applicable ONLY for those who have previously received certification from the NGCRC. The NGCRC provides for Certification Upgrades as explained here, free, automatically when you indicate your previous certification training with the NGCRC.


The registration form asks if you have completed prior Certification Training with the NGCRC. If you have, then you are eligible for a Certification Upgrade, so fill this out on the registration form. This Certification Upgrade procedure recognizes the cumulative nature of training over time (1997-present).


The intermediate, advanced, expert, professional, and master levels of certification therefore recognize this prior NGCRC training. The Basic Training Program is for those persons who have completed no prior certification with the NGCRC. When you register for Certification, you receive two certificates: one in your area of specialization, and one reflecting your level of Certification. The levels of certification are explained below.


 If you have previously obtained Certification from the NGCRC, then you are eligible for a Certification Upgrade to one of the following options:


 Intermediate Level Training Program: completed 24 hours of prior certification with NGCRC.


Advanced Level Training Program: completed 48 hours of prior certification with NGCRC.


Expert Level Training Program: completed 72 hours of prior certification with NGCRC.


Trainer/Consultant Level Training Program: completed 96 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.


Master Level 1 (First Degree) Training Program: completed 120 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

Master Level 2 (Second Degree) Training Program: completed 144 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.


Master Level 3 (Third Degree) Training Program: completed 168 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

Master Level 4 (Fourth Degree) Training Program: completed 192 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

Master Level 5 (Fifth Degree) Training Program: completed 216 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.


Master Level 6 (Sixth Degree) Training Program: completed 240 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

Master Level 7 (Seventh Degree) Training Program: completed 264 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

 

Master Level 8 (Eighth Degree) Training Program: completed 288 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

 

Master Level 9 (Ninth Degree) Training Program: completed 312 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

 

Master Level 10 (Tenth Degree) Training Program: completed 336 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

 

Professional Level 1 (First Degree) Training Program: completed 360 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

 

Professional Level 2 (Second Degree) Training Program: completed 384 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC

 

Professional Level 3 (Third Degree) Training Program: completed 408 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC

 

Professional Level 4 (Fourth Degree) Training Program: Completed 432 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC

 

Professional Level 5 (Fourth Degree) Training Program: Completed 456 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC


CERTIFICATION OPTIONS: Those who register for certification receive two high quality certificates reflecting their training. Those who register for non-certification receive no certificate. However, those who register for non-certification are eligible to upgrade to full certification anytime prior to the conference itself, just pay the $100 additional cost.

 

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Upgrade from Non-Certification to Full Certification Form

 

My name is:_______________________________________________________________

I am already registered for Non-Certification. I wish to change my registration to full Certification.

My training track will be:______________________________________________________

I enclose $100.00 to upgrade my registration to full Certification.

You can also just pay for this On Site at the conference.

Mail this form to: NGCRC, Conference Processing Center, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468

- - -

When registering for certification, the trainee selects one special "track" from the available list. What this means is that the trainee must spend at least four (4) hours in attending sessions designed for that specific "track"; the remaining twenty (20) hours can be used attending anything the trainee wants to attend.

 

 

Select Your Certification Specialty Choice From a List of Different Options (Training Tracks):

       Those who register for certification receive two high quality 8 " x 11" certificates reflecting their training. The certificates carry the seal of the National Gang Crime Research Center. If you register for certification, then you receive two certificates (1) one reflects that you completed the NGCRC's 2018 program consisting of 24 hours of intensive training, and (2) the second certificate reflects that you completed a minimum of four hours in a specialized topical area, i.e., your "track". Those who register for non-certification do not receive any certificates. Registering for non-certification is cheaper. However, those who register for non-certification are eligible to upgrade their enrollment to full certification on or before July 15, 2018, just pay the extra $100 additional cost accompanied with the "Upgrade to Certification" form. The NGCRC conference does attract head hunters and administrators who may not necessarily need or want certification. But if you ever anticipate the need to provide quality proof of your training, you probably want to sign up for certification. When registering for certification, you need to select ONE (1) of the special gang certification training tracks from the available list. There are over 30 options on the list. You need to pick one. What this means is that the trainee must spend at least four (4) hours in attending sessions designed for that specific "track", and the remaining twenty (20) hours can be used attending anything the trainee wants to attend.


SPECIAL TRAINING TRACKS: Several specialized training tracks exist for those registering for Certification. The trainee receives a second certificate for the one area of chosen concentration, reflecting an intensive 4-hour minimum training requirement that is fulfilled during regular training sessions at the conference. A trainee registering for Certification must pick ONE of the specialized training track options. Current areas for choices in the specialized training tracks include the following options:


(1) Gang Crime Investigation Skills Track

(2) Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole Track

(3) Gang Homicide Investigation Skills Track

(4) Gangs and Drugs Track

(5) Gang Problems in K-12 Schools Track

(6) Gangs and Organized Crime

(7) Gangs and Mental Health Track

(8) Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills Track

(9) Gang Internet Investigation

(10) Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services Track

(11) Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills Track

(12) Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists

(13) Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence Track

(14) Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills Track

(15) Motorcycle Gangs (restricted: for Criminal Justice Personnel only)

(16) Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities

(17) Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators

(18) Gang Counseling Skills Track

(19) Advanced Gang Identification

(20) Gang Profile Analysis Track

(21) Gang Prosecution Track

(22) Gang Prevention Skills Track

(23) International and Transnational Gang Problems Track

(24) Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs Track

(25) Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs Track

(26) Female Gangs/Female Gang Members.Track

(27) Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising Skills Track

(28) Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping Track

(29) Gangs and the Mass Media Track

(30) Graffiti Identification and Analysis

(31) Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention Track

(32) Dealing With Military Trained Gang Members

 

Please note: you have the option to delay making a decision about your track by just marking your form "TBA" where it asks for your track name, and this will be treated as "To Be Announced", and you have until July 15, 2018 to actually make up your mind about what track you want to have.

Also, you can change your "Track" at anytime on or before July 15, 2018. To change your track, just fax a memo to that effect to the NGCRC Conference Registration Center: (708) 258-9546.


Cancellation, Refunds, and Replacements Policy:


If you cancel on or before May 21, 2018, and the cancellation form is received on or before May 21, 2018, all of your registration fee minus the $75 cancellation fee will be refunded to you (refund checks are mailed out approximately 2 weeks AFTER the conference is over with).


If you cancel on or after May 22, 2018 and the cancellation form is received by the NGCRC on or before June 21, 2018, you are entitled to a refund in the amount of half (50%) of the registration fee, minus the $75 cancellation fee as well; refund checks are mailed out approximately 2 weeks AFTER the conference is over with.

Note: After 6-22-2018 there are no longer any refunds allowed. No-shows are non-refundable. We cannot be responsible for any transportation problems you had.


Note: It is not an affirmative defense to say you had trouble with our fax machine getting your cancellation form submitted "on time". You need to be using the United States Postal Service as your primary vehicle of notification, so that it has an official "time and date" stamp on it. If you are "late" with regard to dates for cancelling, then late means the terms and conditions apply. There are no exceptions to the terms and conditions for cancellation and refunds and replacements as listed here.

Note: You can "swap" or replace someone for a paid position. There is no additional cost for replacements. Just make sure you promptly do this on agency stationary and get it faxed and mailed in ASAP.

 

As always the NGCRC will provide prompt refunds in cases where a trainee must cancel and contacts us to that effect, with sufficient advance notice, before the conference. However, because I.D.'s, credentials, and materials have already been prepared at time of the receipt of registration, and other related expenses will have already been incurred by the NGCRC on behalf of the registered trainee, a $75.00 fee will be assessed for any cancellation. If you need to cancel your registration, therefore, the NGCRC is responsible only for your registration fee refund minus the $75.00 cancellation fee. Further, there is a long-standing policy in a number of organizations providing training such as this to limit the amount of the refund: thus, if the cancellation request is received on or before May 21st, 2018, we will refund the entire registration fee minus the $75 cancellation fee.


However, if the cancellation request is received after May 22, 2018 and on or before June 21st, 2018 only 50% of the amount will be refundable (minus the additional $75 cancellation fee); and if the cancellation request is received on or after June 22nd, 2018, there are no refunds allowed. There are no special exceptions such as health, sickness, court duty, etc. It is important that you follow the format of the cancellation request: the cancellation request must be in writing, a phone call will not suffice; the written request must be mailed to the NGCRC, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468; and please fax us a copy as well (708) 258-9546, in the request please state who we should make the refund check payable to. No cancellations will be accepted by Email service or over the internet: U.S. Postal Service and fax are the two methods you need to use.

 

Replacements: replacements are allowed at any time. Should someone who has been registered for the conference be unable to attend, the agency may send a replacement at no extra cost. However, if you intend to do this, please notify us in writing so that the notice is received one week in advance to be able to have the proper ID Badge ready at time of registration. If you wait until the last minute, then it is still possible to send a replacement: but we would have to make their ID BADGE on-site at the Conference location. If you do want to send a replacement, kindly fax that request to (708) 258-9546 and follow-up with a phone call to (708) 258-9111. On-site replacements are also allowed.

 

The NGCRC refund policy supercedes any credit card policy if the person so registered for the conference has paid conference fees by means of a credit card.

No-Shows Non-Refundable: Those who are registered, but do not show up for the conference are not eligible for a refund.


- - - - -


Please Print and Execute this Refund Form if you Want a Refund:


 REFUND FORM:


My name is _________________________ Today’s date is _______ . I paid $_______ for registration for the 2018 Twentyfirst International Gang Specialist Training Program, and I will not be able to attend, and I am requesting a refund.

I understand that if this form is received by the NGCRC before May 21st, 2018 I am entitled to a full refund minus the $75 cancellation fee.
I understand if the cancellation request is received after May 22nd, 2018 and on or before June 21st, 2018 only 50% of the amount will be refundable (minus the $75 cancellation fee); and if the cancellation request is received on or after June 22nd, 2018, there are no refunds allowed


Please make the refund check payable to _________________________


Mail it to:__________________________________________________


Note: Refund Form must be “received” by fax or U.S. Postal Service on or before designated eligibility dates.


- - - - -
After June 22nd, 2018 no REFUNDS ARE ALLOWED. However, you can have a free "replacement". Just complete the replacement form provided here.


Replacement and Cancellation Form


Name of registration being cancelled:_____________________________________________


Name of Replacement for the above cancellation:____________________________________



Attach new registration form for the replacement and fax this on your letterhead to NGCRC: (708) 258-9546




POLICY WITH REGARD TO ON-SITE REGISTRATIONS:

 1. Please beware that the NGCRC may not accept your on-site registration due to a lack of space (it is expected that the registrations will close early this year). One of the things the NGCRC does is prepare a very elaborate and valuable "goody bag" for all persons attending the conference, and we spend a great deal of effort and manpower in preparing exactly the number of bags needed. We cannot create more bags for unexpected “new arrivals”. If you are planning on registering onsite, even for a one day pass, you should call in advance to make sure we have room.

 2. Everyone who is registered for this conference receives POSITIVE PROOF of their registration in the form of a confirmation letter from the NGCRC. If you have never received one of these letters from the NGCRC confirming your registration for the conference, then it is clear: you may not be registered for the conference.

3. Because of past abuses: the NGCRC will no longer accept promises of payment from agencies or individuals on-site. You will not be able to show up with a Purchase Order and register onsite.


REGISTRATION COSTS:


Note that the cost schedule refers to when exactly the payment is actually made for the training registration. There have been no increases in costs for the NGCRC Training Conference; the costs for 2018 remain the same as in 2017.


Thus the earlier the registration is processed the cheaper the registration cost. This sliding scale provides an incentive to register early in case "slots" for the training conference fill up early; as we do expect them to fill up early; we may at some point therefore not accept additional registrations if space is filled. Watch this Website for the notice of whether slots are available.

 

ADVANCE REGISTRATION PERIOD:

Paying on or before December 31, 2017: Non-Certification $450, Certificatin $500

 

EARLY REGISTRATION PERIODS:

Paying on or after January 1, 2018 and on or before January 31, 2018: Non-Certification $500, Certification $550

Paying on or after February 1, 2018 and on or before February 28, 2018: Non-Certification $550, Certification $600

Paying on or after March 1, 2018 and on or before March 31, 2018: Non-Certification $600, Certification $650

 

REGULAR REGISTRATION PERIODS:

Paying on or after April 1, 2018 and on or before April 30, 2018: Non-Certification $650, Certification $700

Paying on or after May 1, 2018 and on or before May 31, 2018: Non-Certification $700, Certification $750

Paying on or after June 1, 2018 and on or before June 30, 2018: Non-Certification $750, Certification $800

Paying on or after July 1, 2018 and on or before July 31, 2018: Non-Certification $800, Certification $850

 

LATE REGISTRATION PERIOD:

Paying on or after August 1, 2018 and on or before August 4th, 2018: Non-Certification, $900, Certification $950

 

ONSITE REGISTRATION: An Onsite Registration is any registration made on or after August 5, 2018.

Paying On-Site (If slots are available): Non-Certification $950, Certification $1000

 

Price for the One-Day Pass: $395 per day.

You need to specify which day: ___Monday ___Tuesday ___Wednesday

 

 

Special Notice on On-Site Registration: (1) it is best that you get an advance "approval" from the NGCRC for any intention of trying to register for on-site registration, this is true for several reasons, including the lack of space, (2) because space is limited and we will not admit you automatically you are urged to notify the NGCRC in writing of your intent to register on-site, further that the NGCRC have this notification on or before July 15, (3) get your "clearance code" to register on-site, as we cannot guarantee any space available for "walkins".


Multiple Registration Discount:


Any agency registering three persons, simultaneously, is eligible for a $100 discount off the total training cost (by which we mean a $33.33 discount for each of the three). Additional discounts would apply for those agencies registering four or more persons (simultaneously) for training. An agency registering more than three persons, simultaneously, will qualify for a Group Discount Code. Call the National Gang Crime Research Center to inquire about group rates (708 258-9111). The Group Discount Code provides a sliding-scale group rate discount. There is no retroactive value: if you do not apply for a Group Discount Code in advance of registration then you are not eligible for it. Inquire about your eligibility for other discounts (e.g., if you were registered for some other gang training conference that had to be cancelled if they are reputable organizations the NGCRC might have established discount incentives we can offer persons who were not able to attend due to the conference being cancelled --- the NGCRC works with a lot of such organizations.....so just inquire to see if you are eligible for a discount, sometimes we can help, sometimes we can't....it depends on what organization cancelled out on you.....the one thing you can always count on is that the NGCRC will never cancel on you).

There are no multiple registration discounts for the One Day Pass.

 

 

EXHIBITORS:


 Various exhibitors are expected at the Conference, including books, materials about gangs. If you are a company that wants to exhibit, call the NGCRC for details, (708) 258-9111. Vendors are not allowed to attend training sessions. Vendors get about 20 hours of exhibit time (from 9am Monday until noon Wednesday).

 


PICKING UP YOUR REGISTRATION MATERIALS:


 Trainees need to pick up their registration materials, these include: I.D. Badge, Evaluation Form, Conference Proceedings, and related materials distributed to trainees. You pick up your registration materials at the Training Site: the hotel, ask for the NGCRC Operations Center room, or follow conspicuously posted signage.


Trainees may pick up their registration materials during the evening of Sunday, August 5, 2018. That is early registration. This will start at 3:00 p.m. and last until 10:00 p.m.


 Trainees may also pick up their registration materials during the early morning registration period (starting at 6:00 a.m. on Monday August 6, 2018). That is the regular registration.


 Trainees may also pick up their registration materials at any time during the training schedule by coming to the Operations Room at the Training Site. That would cover anyone arriving for late registration.


 


THE REGULAR TRAINING TIME SCHEDULE


 Here is the Monday (August 6, 2018), Tuesday (August 7, 2018), Wednesday (August 8, 2018) training schedule (August 6-8, 2018): training sessions 8:00 am-noon, 1 hour lunch break, training sessions 1:00 pm-5:00 pm. Thus, a total of 24 training hours are logged in during the regular training schedule. We do, of course, offer "pre-conference" sessions for credit (on Sunday afternoon: mostly for those new to gang training).


Some evening functions (after 5:00 p.m.) are also going to be scheduled. There are also "early riser" sessions: for those who want a session before 8am. There will even be "noon sessions": we are doing this to accommodate travel arrangements where persons may arrive late, or where they may have to leave the training site to return early. Dress code: informal. All training rooms are airconditioned.


THE NGCRC IS A FAMILY FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT:


The NGCRC, unlike most other conferences, is "family friendly". If you have a spouse or children who may need to visit with you during your training time period, the NGCRC has established the "family friendly policy" of providing Conference Identification Badges to family members (spouses, children, etc). This allows them to come in and have coffee and donuts with you, etc. Thus, you are not "isolated" from your family. To receive I.D. badge credentials for your family members, just ask for "Family ID Credentials" in a fax or written letter to the NGCRC: Give their names. When you register, to pick up your own Registration Materials, you will find their "Family ID's" in your own registration kit. They will be allowed into the "secure areas" so they may contact you. These "family members" will not receive "Goody Bags" or conference materials, but they will be allowed past the security check points and will therefore be able to pass without delay or hindrance to meet with you if necessary. Some restaurants and eateries give NGCRC trainees a discount (no discount on liquor, food only), and all you have to do is show your Conference Identification Badge. The "Family ID's" are good for the food discounts. An example of this from the 2017 Conference is the famous German restaurant "The Berghoff Restaurant", 17 West Adams, Chicago, IL; in your goody bag we include a card for a free bavarian pretzel, and you get 15% off your food when you display your conference ID card; or 15% off at Gino's East; 10% off at State Street Subway Sandwich..




Enhancements --- EARLY, NOON, and EVENING SESSIONS:


            To accommodate those individuals who want to leave early on Wednesday August 8th (2018), and still allow them to accumulate their 24 hours of training, we are this year planning to offer some early morning, lunch time, and evening sessions. The current plan is to have a few such sessions available for this purpose. This will provide at least four (4) hours of training outside of the regular training schedule, which will allow persons who need to leave at noon on Friday to do so.

            Rooms are available at the Hotel at the same rate for Friday nights and Saturday as well, at the same rates, if anyone is interested in getting cheaper flights by staying an extra day or so: just ask the hotel registration personnel. You should be able to get the same rate for two days prior and two days after the 6-8 August 2018 time frame. If you have trouble with the hotel, feel free to call the NGCRC and ask for the "hotel liaison" to see if there is anything we can do to help. Sometimes the "block of bumper rooms" sells out (bumper rooms are those before and after the conference).

            You basically "pick and choose" your own custom-made training schedule. You can take your pick from a number of different session choices. There are typically six or seven sessions going on at any particular time. So, you just "vote with your feet". The full schedule of courses by room numbers, and day/time slots will be posted at this website prior to the conference. You can therefore study it and more effectively use your training time prior to arrival.




DRESS CODE:


            We have had a number of questions about "dress code" from persons registered to attend the conference. We can clarify this now: there is no dress code. Dress casual, it is summer time. If you want to dress more formally, that's okay too. Your laminated military-style identification badge for the conference gives you access to the building locations you need access to.


USE OF COMMUNICATION DEVICES AND MATERIALS AT THE NGCRC GANG TRAINING CONFERENCE: SPECIFIC RESTRICTIONS AND SPECIFIC PROHIBITIONS

1. BACKGROUND
The National Gang Crime Research Center's annual gang specialist training conferences often relate sensitive information and/or data via various forms of communication, and are attended by undercover officers.
2. DEFINITIONS
A. Communication Devices: Are defined as digital or film cameras, digital or videotape recorders, digital or tape voice recorders, cellular telephones capable of transmitting visual images or recording audio memos, and apparatuses capable of transmitting or recording textual messages.
B. Materials: Are defined as any spoken words of an instructor, any MS PowerPoint slides, any photocopied handouts, any official and unofficial publications, and the visual identity (facial recognition) of any undercover agents.
C. Originator: Is defined as the person, persons, organization, or agency responsible for the authorship (i.e., preparation, presentation, publication, and/or utterance) of any of the above materials.
3. POLICY
This policy is, therefore, established for the use and protection of the aforementioned.
A. Communication devices capable of recording are prohibited from use within the training area--noting the following.
(1) Except as employed by NGCRC staff or security personnel.
(2) Except as authorized by the NGCRC Director or Security Staff Chief.
B. Communication devices capable of transmission are prohibited from use within the training area--noting the following.
(1) Except as necessary to remain in contact for official business related to one's employment.
(2) Cellular telephones and pagers may remain on, but must be set at the least distractive alert setting possible [such as "vibrate"].
(3) All conversation or messaging will be conducted in the hallways and not in classrooms during class sessions.
C. An originator's written permission must be obtained before quoting, paraphrasing, or otherwise referencing any portion of the above-mentioned materials under the following conditions.
(1) When within any journalistic context.
(2) When within any mass media context.
(3) When within any proceedings of an official nature

4. VIOLATIONS

Any violations of this policy shall be grounds for immediate and permanent expulsion of said persons violating this policy from the conference.



THE CHRISTIAN GANG SPECIALIST RECEPTION:


      This is available only to persons registered for the conference. This will be held during an "off time" in the regular conference schedule. If you answered "YES" to the question on your registration form "I am interested in networking with Christian gang specialists while at this conference", then your I.D. Badge is already coded with a special ticket code that allows you into this reception. If you answered "NO" or left the quastion blank, it was assumed you are not interested. If you fall into the latter category, the Session Attendance Simulation Survey will ask you a second time if you want to be added to the group of persons who will attend this special networking reception. As we need to plan on how many are attending, no "walk ins" will be allowed. And as is the NGCRC tradition, of course, there are "door prizes" at this reception. Come prepared for some amazing testimony.

         The format this year will likely be a light luncheon format (we are still working out specific arrangements: so stay tuned to this website for further details and developments). As always, there is no extra "charge" for signing up for receptions that may also provide you with food, beverages, etc. It is something you are automatically entitled to as a part of your conference registration fee. We will modify this announcement as needed. The Christian Gang Specialist Networking Reception is scheduled for Noon, Tuesday, August 7, 2018.

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The Christian Gang Specialist Network Reception Ticket Request Form

 

I am registered for the Conference. Please Sign me up for the Christian Gang Specialist Network Reception.

 

Name:__________________________________________

Address:________________________________________

City, ST, ZIP:____________________________________

 

Fax and mail this to the NGCRC: Fax (708) 258-9546.

Mail: NGCRC, 2018 Conference Processing Center, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990

 

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The Law Enforcement, Prosecution, Corrections Network Reception:


 This is available only to persons who work in law enforcement, prosecution, or corrections agencies. How do you sign up? Through the Registration Form itself or use the special request form below. If you do, you are in and a ticket will be in your registration file folder when you arrive at the conference. No ticket, no entrance to the event.


 It is headed up by Fred Moreno (Chicago, Illinois) and Dr. Gregg W. Etter (University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO).


At this year's training conference we are sponsoring a "Agency Patch Exchange" within the networking function designed for corrections and law enforcement personnel. If you are interested, please secure some of your agency's patches and bring them with you. We will have a time set aside for this at the Corrections/Law Enforcement Network function. So bring your appetite and your patches and have a great time! As always, there is no extra "charge" for signing up for receptions that may also provide you with food, beverages, etc. It is something you are automatically entitled to as a part of your conference registration fee.


And as is the NGCRC tradition, of course, there are "door prizes" at this reception. The Corrections/Law Enforcement Reception is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 7, 2018.

 

- - - -

 

The Corrections/Law Enforcement Network Reception Ticket Request Form

 

I work in Law Enforcement, Prosecution, or Corrections. Please Sign me up for the Law Enforcement, Prosecution, Corrections Network Reception.

 

Name:__________________________________________

Address:________________________________________

City, ST, ZIP:____________________________________

 

Fax and mail this to the NGCRC: Fax (708) 258-9546.

Mail: NGCRC, 2018 Conference Processing Center, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990

 

- - - --


The Veterans Reception: For Vets Only, by Dr. Todd Negola, NGCRC Staff; Fred Moreno, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL and NGCRC staff; and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN, and NGCRC staff.

            One (1) hour  Scheduled for Monday August 6th, noon.

            Session Credits: Gang Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            This is a special reception for vets only. It is held during the lunch hour on Monday. The purpose is to express appreciation to veterans for their service in the defense of freedom. If you are a vet, come and attend, find a warm, friendly environment. Door prizes. Great chances to network and mingle. Learn something new, meet somebody new. Sponsored by the NGCRC staff, you will feel appreciated here.

Bios

            These men are are long time staff of the NGCRC, and are well known for their gang expertise. Todd is also a psychologist whose practice is with vets through the VA. Fred is an investigator with the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. Lee is a vet who still fits into his issued uniform and teaches gang mapping technology, among other topics.

         No ticket is required for the Veterans Reception.

- - -

The Prevention/Intervention/Counseling Networking Reception:


 This is available to anyone attending the conference. Just sign up for it on your registration form. This is one of the exciting features of the 2018 Conference. The purpose is to allow specialized networking among those persons in schools, private programs, and those in the helping professions who work directly with gang members in a prevention, intervention, or counseling capacity. Come prepared to meet other like-minded persons from a wide variety of occupational backgrounds; come prepared to make some new friends who will last a life time.

 

The 2018 NGCRC Prevention/Intervention/Counseling Network Reception is open to anyone signed up for the conference, there is a "check list" on the registration form itself: you need to check "yes" that you want to attend the Prevention/Intervention/Counseling Networking Reception. You get one (1) hour of session attendance credit for it. It occurs, however, in the early evening. Stay tuned for further details as they will be announced here at this website. As always, there is no extra "charge" for signing up for receptions that may also provide you with food, beverages, etc. It is something you are automatically entitled to as a part of your conference registration fee. The Prevention/Intervention/Counseling Reception is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. Monday, August 6, 2018.

 

Here is the Session information for the Prevention/Intervention/Counseling Networking Reception:

 

(56) Gang Prevention - Intervention - Counseling Networking Reception”. This is hosted by Dr. Douglas L. Semark, Gang Alternatives Program, Los Angeles, CA.

            One (1) hour 

            Special Note: 5pm-6pm in the Millenium Park Room, Monday, August 6, 2018. You need a ticket for the event, you get the ticket by signing up for it on your registration form. The ticket will be waiting for you in your registration packet you receive when you pick up your conference ID credentials.

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Special Procedure for Sign Up: You need to check the “box” on your registration form in order to qualify to attend this event. It is a “ticketed” event. You get the ticket one way: by signing up for it on the registration form itself.

            Abstract

            The gang intervention/prevention reception is a special event at the NGCRC and it has a long history of also being a valuable networking session. Come hear some analysis of the current state of affairs in gang prevention and learn about some people who are really making a difference in the world. This is also the time and venue in which the “NGCRC Spirit of Excellence Awards” are made. There are also door prizes in a random drawing based on your ticket to the event. You need to have a ticket to attend this event. The only way to get a ticket is to sign up for it in advance on the registration form itself.

            Bios

               Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D. has been a nonprofit leader for more than three decades, including 12 years as Executive Director of the Gang Alternatives Program in Los Angeles County. He provides professional develoment in the area of gang prevention to the LAUSD K-12 school counselors; serves in various advisory capacities with local law enforcement, including LAPD and LASD; works on various city and county agencies in the areas of violence reduction and community rebuilding; and works actively with nationally-known academic institutions and corporations to improve the quality of life, health, and equity for kids and families in gang-controlled and violent communities.

- - - -

The Prevention/Intervention/Counseling Network Reception Ticket Request Form

 

I am registered for the Conference.. Please Sign me up for the Prevention/Intervention/Counseling Network Reception.

 

Name:__________________________________________

Address:________________________________________

City, ST, ZIP:____________________________________

 

Fax and mail this to the NGCRC: Fax (708) 258-9546.

Mail: NGCRC, 2018 Conference Processing Center, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990

 

 

- - - - - -

 

 

CODE FOR THE LAMINATED MILITARY-STYLE IDENTIFICATION BADGES USED AT THIS CONFERENCE:


Some badges have unique identifiers that will help you. Watch for these.


A RED star on the Identification Badge indicates someone on the NGCRC's Goodwill Ambassador Staff; they also wear special easily identifiable uniforms; see them if you have any issue, or to report any problems with equipment inside the training rooms.


A BLUE star on the Identification Badge indicates someone who is a trainer or presenter. These are certainly people you need to network with.


A PLATINUM star on the Identification Badge indicates the person is a current or former Reviewing Editor of the Journal of Gang Research, the official publication of the NGCRC.


A GREEN star on the Identification Badge indicates someone who works for the NGCRC: these are NGCRC staff, they can HELP YOU; ask them if you have any questions.


A GOLD star on the Identification Badge indicates someone who is receiving a Thrasher Award this year at the Awards Ceremony.

 


 


Some Typical Questions and Answers:


Q: Can I spend more than four (4) hours in my track area?

A: Yes, of course, if your track area, for example is "Gang Crime Investigation Skills" or "Gang Prevention Skills", then you are going to find you have a heck of a lot of choices; you may be able to log in 24 hours directly in your area of concentration (e.g., your track area).


Q: We have 24 hours of training, and if 4 of those hours have to be in the courses specifically approved for the track, then what do I do for the other 20 hours?

A: The other 20 hours are electives: you can spend then anyway you want to, vote with your feet: if you are eligible to attend a session, then attend it. Remember and please note that some sessions are restricted to law enforcement. But most are not restricted. You can attend anything you want to attend.


Q: I am bringing my wife and three school age children, should I ask for family credentials for all of them?

A. Sure, if you want to. The advantage to the family members is that they can get restaurant discounts with their ID cards.

Q: Can the NGCRC guarantee that I will be able to attend everything I want to attend?

A: No, and obviously not for the simple reason that these courses are NOT REPEATED; the courses are offered once and that is it; you have to make HARD CHOICES between 2 or 3 or more different courses, all of which are attractive --- and so, like we said before one person could never attend all of the courses we offer. We have at least six or seven courses going on at once: these are not repeating courses. If you want to attend two sessions that are going on simultaneously, then you would have to decide which you wanted most. Plan B: split your time between two equally attractive courses.

 

Q: What is the seating style at the NGCRC conference, are there desks to write on?

A: There are no desks to write on, that is often called "student style seating". We use what is called "auditorium style seating". You get a chair, but no table to write on. You might want to consider bringing your posse box to have on your lap, so you can write on that. We do no have desktops to write on.

 Q: Do you have to be a returning participant with certification to attend this conference for certification?

A: No.

 

Q: When I see the NGCRC Training Conference referred to as "Gang College", does that phrase mean that the training converts to, or is equivalent in any respect to, college credit towards a college or university degree program?

A: No. The NGCRC has in its two decades of experience in training actually embedded the opportunity to complete college or university credit as a supplemental part of the training program, but we found that there was very little interest in that option, and we have not offered the college credit option for years. Do some professors who work with the NGCRC offer partial course credit, for example towards some college credit course, yes, that is certainly possible, but it would not be open to the public, it would be available only at the local college or university in question; it is not something you can sign up for with the regular registration application form. The NGCRC continues to work with a number of faculty members from different institutions of higher learning where criminal justice students are provided an opportunity to attend the NGCRC training conference. Has the NGCRC offered CEU's (Continuing Education Units) for some of its courses in the overall training program, yes, but we make no guarantee of offering this because again we found that few people wanted to take advantage of this enhancement option. Does the NGCRC training program include "cross training" by other accrediting bodies, yes, the Mental Health First Aid course would be a good example of this. The NGCRC cannot assure you that you will ever be able to receive college credit of any kind for the training it offers.

 

Q: What is the seating style, student seating with tables, or theater style?

A: The seating style is threater style. No tables to write on. You can bring a clip board or writing tablet to make it easier to take notes while seated in a chair.

 

Q: I hear a lot of the hotels in Chicago require a deposit for "incidentals"?

A: Yes, Chicago is a big city, big city hotels do this. Incidentals refers to phone calls, room service, the liquors/goodies in the fridge. You can always tell the front desk they can take out the phone and the fridge and make a note that there will be no room service for your room.

 

Q: I am a defense attorney or journalist, can I attend and exploit your environment for my personal benefit?

A: No

 

Q: Do you need to have any specific educational qualifications to attend this conference?

A: No (but you must be 18 years of age or older at the time you register).

 

Q: What do I do if I am in that situation of finding my top two courses being offered at the same time?

A: Well it is possible to get credit for partial attendance at a session, you can indicate on your Conference Evaluation Form that you attended the session, but mark on it that you were there for 30 minutes or 1 hour, etc. But normally we do not run courses in the same track up against each other.


Q: What I would like to do is sample from a large number of different areas of expertise after I knock out my minimum of four hours in my track area, but how do I know which classes or courses or sessions "count" towards my track area?

A: Just look at the "Session Credits" line of information inside each session. This provides the types of tracks that the session is geared towards. If your track is listed in the Session Credits, then that course will count towards the minimum of four (4) hours you have to accumulate in your one track area. You can obviously spend a lot more than four (4) hours in some of the tracks, that is up to you.

 

Q: Is the NGCRC training "Accredited" by any board of higher education?

A: No. The term "accredited" normally applies to college/legal/continuing education credits. In past years the NGCRC has offered college credit and CEU's, from obviously accredited universities. Similarly, the NGCRC training has been approved and accepted by the accrediting body in some states for attorneys or prosecutors (State Supreme Court), but again, this is such a rare interest area, we do not seek it out and we do not offer it as one of the features of our training program. If you know someone who should "accredit" gang training, write to us with your concerns as we feel we should be on "their" board due to our leadership in this field for over a decade. We do not have a "static" program, our program is new and expanded every year: with new material added on a constant basis for over one hundred different courses, this is not a typical "gang training program" (where the typical gang training program has a few, a dozen or so, choices of sessions or courses to take: we have much more material and much more diversity).

Q: Does the NGCRC offer "CEU's" or Continuing Education Units in 2018?

A: No. We are not continuing this because there was little interest.



THE TRAINING SITE:

The Westin Michigan Avenue Hotel


 This hotel is in a classy part of the north Loop. It is situated in the "Gold Coast" area of north Michigan Avenue (the shopping district) by Chicago's Water Tower. The "Water Tower" is Chicago's famous landmark. The Westin Hotel is known as a favorite hotel for sports celebrities when they stay in Chicago. It is easy to get to, conveniently located, well known, and has many amenities to offer. It has scored favorably in the annual evaluations the NGCRC has conducted as well (the Conference Evaluation Form asks attendees to evaluate a lot of things, including the experience with hotel).

HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS:

The site where the training is occurring is the Westin Michigan Avenue Chicago hotel.

 

The Westin Michigan Avenue is located at 909 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611. The Telephone number for the Westin Michigan Avenue Hotel is (312) 943-7200. The toll free number for the Central Reservations Call Center is: 1 (888) 627-8385. When making reservations, the "code" for the conference is "NGCRC Gang Conference". They need that "code" to give you the reduced hotel rates.

 

The cut-off date for getting the rates here is July 16, 2018: Singles $199, Double $199, Triple $224, Quad Rate $249.

 

Trainees will, as in past NGCRC training conferences, be able to pick up their "goody bags" the evening before training begins. Opening Ceremony is 0700 Monday in the Chicago Ballroom; actual Training begins 8am Monday morning, August 6, 2018. However, you will be able to pick up your registration materials, your Identification Badge, the final schedule, and your "goody bag" the night before: we expect to be able to start giving out registration materials about 3pm on Sunday, 5 August 2018. We will be open to provide this service until about 8:00 p.m. Just go the the NGCRC Operations Center (The Garfield Park Room is the NGCRC Operations Center) to pick up your materials. Signs will be prominently displayed.

 

LOOKING FOR FOOD/ENTERTAINMENT DEALS WHILE IN TOWN?

           For special deals on dining and entertainment while in Chicago, you might want to check a reliable source that Chicagoans use: www.190north.com

           The website www.190north.com contains good and reliable information on unique dining and entertainment deals in Chicago. 

 

 


The 2018 NGCRC 21st International Gang Specialist

Training Conference:

The Preliminary or Advance

Curriculum and Detailed Course Offerings

for August 6-8, 2018



             Please note that the 2018 program is just now getting started and the curriculum is still adding courses.
            This is only an early preliminary listing, or an advance listing of the courses already approved for inclusion in the Official 2018 Curriculum. We expect to be adding more sessions to this curriculum on a regular basis. Note: The session numbering is subject to change.

 

            The full conference information is available at www.ngcrc.com/2018.conference.html

 

Note: This is only a preliminary listing or advance listing of sessions, there are usually over 100 different sessions to actually pick and choose from for persons attending the NGCRC Gang Training Conference.

 

Note: This is only a preliminary listing or advance listing of sessions, there are usually over 100 different sessions to actually pick and choose from for persons attending the NGCRC Gang Training Conference. There are N = 25 sessions listed here as of this early date.


Last updated: 20 Sept 2017


(1) “An Analysis of Native American Gangs in South Dakota”, by Mario L. Hesse, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            This session presents an analysis of Native American gang-crime in two metropolitan counties within the state of South Dakota. An analysis of each gang, the members and characteristics will be presented. This session will also discuss the “possible” linkage between juvenile gang-crime and a number of variables (age, gender, race, location, etc).

            Bio

            Mario L. Hesse, Ph.D. is a professor of criminal justice at the St. Cloud State University (MN). Dr. Hesse’s research and teaching interests are in corrections, gangs and media and crime. Mario has extensive experience working in the corrections field (adult community-based programs, juvenile detention centers and juvenile probation). Mario has published articles in ACJS Today, Corrections Today, Great Plains Sociologist, Criminal Justice Review, and the Journal of Gang Research. Currently, Mario is a review-editor for the Journal of Gang Research and an associate editor for Forensics Scholars Today. He is a coauthor of Gangs (2016) and Juvenile Justice: The Essentials (2010) textbooks. Mario is a staff member and frequent presenter at the National Gang Crime Research Center.


(2) “Getting Published: How to Publish Your Gang Related Research”, by Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D., Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, University of Central Missouri; and Dr. Carter F. Smith, JD, Ph.D., Lecturer, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University. 

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists

            Abstract

            This session examines how an academic or criminal justice practitioner can share their knowledge of the gang field by publishing articles in the criminal justice literature. Selecting a subject, formatting, cover letters, and publishing venue selection are covered. What is the difference between a trade magazine or edited journal and a refereed journal? How do you write a book proposal?

            Bios

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter Sr., Ed.D. is a Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He served with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office in Wichita, Kansas from 1977 to 2006, retiring as a Lieutenant. Dr. Etter is the author of three (3) books, six (6) chapters in books, thirty (30) refereed articles and eighteen (18) edited articles. He earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate Degree from Oklahoma State University.

            Dr. Carter F. Smith, JD, Ph.D. Is a Lecturer in the Criminal Justice Administration Department at Middle Tennessee State University. He was a U.S. Army special agent with the Criminal Investigative Division for over twenty-two years. Dr. Smith is the author of five (5) books, twelve (12) refereed articles and two (2) edited articles. He earned his Bachelor’s degree from Austin Peay State University, his Juris Doctorate from Southern Illinois University, and his Doctorate degree from Northcentral University.


(3) “An Introduction to Understanding Prison Gangs”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            It has been stated over and over again that those who control the prisons, control the streets. Prison gangs remain a serious threat to personal safety through their intricate work while incarcerated as well as their connections and counterparts on the streets. This presentation will provide a visual tour of prison/street gang tattoos, group photographs, and confiscated material, providing key intelligence to law enforcement, educators, researchers, and correctional staff. Also included is a basic introduction to prison gang identification and gang activity in prison. A brief investigation into the criminal personality and profile that underlies gang existence and activities will be included. By focusing on the major prison gangs influencing our correctional institutions today, it is intended that the participant will have a fundamental understanding of prison gangs, their activities in prison, and reasons for their existence.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(4) “Understanding the Relationship Between the Individual, Their Attitudes, Gang Membership, and Desistance from Crime”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Postgrad Researcher, International Centre for Investigative Psychology, University of Huddersfield, England.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Techniques.

            Abstract

            The present research investigated the offending frequencies for youth gang members and leavers by using longitudinal data from the Pathways to Desistance Study. It found that although gang leavers continued to offend, they had significantly different attitudes and scored lower on negative psychological traits than those who remained. These findings suggest that future interventions should consider utilising psychological and attitudinal measures, rather than gang membership per se, to assess an individual’s risk of recidivism. This session will help those who work with youth gang members how they might identify those individuals who would be more pen to attitudinal changes, including respect for the law, within programmes.

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a postgraduate researcher in the International Centre for Investigative Psychology at University of Huddersfield and a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University. In 2017 she was a recipient of a Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for superior accomplishments in gang research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. The presentation is co-authored with Dr. Maria Ioannou, a Chartered Forensic Psychologist and Reader in Investigative Psychology and Course Director for the Msc in Investigative Psychology at the University of Huddersfield.

Maria has been involved in the assessment of intervention programmes for reducing/preventing a range of different forms of criminality. And Dr. Laura Hammond, Senior Lecturer and Assistant Course Director for the M.S.c. at Huddersfield and who has worked with academic groups, and law enforcement agencies around the world on a range of consultancy and criminal legal cases.


(5) The Criminal Mind and the Gangster”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            The Criminal Mind; is it biology, sociology, psychology, or choice? This presentation will dive deep into the mind of the criminal and the criminal gang member. The concepts of Sociopathy, Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Psychopathy serve as the framework for this exploration. Candid interviews and videotaped vignettes will illustrate some of the thought processes that have served these individuals in forsaking others to get their individual needs met. Attendees will examine how the criminal mind operates and how such individuals have managed to manipulate even the most innocent of victims. Perhaps even more importantly, law enforcement and mental health professionals will learn ways to protect themselves against con games and strategies utilized by this profile.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(6) “The Need for Insider Research: The Opportunities and Challenges of Doing Research Within Your Own Agency”, by Keiron McConnell, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            This session will explore the challenges, both practical ad ethical with conducting research projects from within the studied group. This session will briefly explain qualitative and quantitative methods that can be drawn upon for research design. Moreover, the session will encourage participants to engage in work related research projects that are robust and defendable. This session will further discuss the current research by the presenter which as serving as a gang police officer interviewed 17 stakeholders, including 5 “former” gang members, 245 hours of field observations with gang units in Canada, United States and the U.K., and a content analysis of newspapers. This session will be of value to professionals considering research from their own agencies, perhaps as a way to satisfy a Ph.D. dissertation project, and certainly to any graduate or undergraduate students involved in gang research. 

            Bio

            Keiron holds a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement comes with 22 years of operational experience with a large Criminal Justice Agency. In addition, Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Royal Roads University, and at Douglas College in the Criminology Program. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”. He is currently a Doctorate Candidate at the London Metropolitan University in London, England.


(7) “Gangs, Guns and Drugs in Canada”, by Keiron McConnell, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada..

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            In this presentation the audience will learn about the structure of policing in Canada and the impact this has on Gangs, Guns, and Drugs. This presentation will include a discussion on the impact that Canada has in its law enforcement and policies on the U.S. with a focus on the importation of marijuana into the U.S. and the exportation of guns and cocaine into Canada from the U.S.

            Bio

            Keiron holds a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement comes with 22 years of operational experience with a large Criminal Justice Agency. In addition, Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Royal Roads University, and at Douglas College in the Criminology Program. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”. He is currently a Doctorate Candidate at the London Metropolitan University in London, England.


(8)Burnout in Blue: Exploring Burnout in Law Enforcement and Related Careers”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Counseling Skills.

            Abstract

      Although rarely discussed and infrequently acknowledged, burnout is a common phenomenon. This course is developed for law enforcement and related audiences to explore the unique and rarely understood stressors inherent in this career arena. The theoretical underpinnings of burnout will be introduced, including exploration into the physiological and psychological processes of this experience. Attendees will then be presented with responses, research, and new tactics that have been developed to help advance resilience and coping skills development. This course is vital for everyone, whether novice or seasoned veteran, because burnout will affect all professionals, either directly or indirectly. Participants will leave with practical knowledge which may add years to their career and longevity.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(9) “Better Intel and Prevention: Monitoring Gang Problems in Bars and Nightclubs”, by Keiron McConnell, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            Many benefits stem from having a cooperative surveillance system in place to monitor gang members at bars and nightclubs. Bar, restaurant, and club owners do not want the violence that can come from gang members, so they are usually very cooperative. This session describes a community based gang prevention initiative that promotes public safety by denying members of gangs and organised crime group’s entry to bars and restaurants in Vancouver, British Columbia. Bar Watch and Restaurant Watch in partnership with the Vancouver Police and the CFSEU Gang Task Force have significantly reduced the gang violence around participating clubs and restaurants through partnership and exclusion policies. An examination of recent legal statutes and applicability to United States jurisdictions will be discussed. In addition, an examination of the spread of this program in other parts of Canada including legislative change to embody the program in statute. The program has been credited with reducing shootings and decreasing public fear. During this session the audience will also be given some background information about the gang situation in British Columbia and police efforts to combat it. Could some version of this program work in your community? Attend this session and find out.

            Bio

            Keiron holds a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement comes with 22 years of operational experience with a large Criminal Justice Agency. In addition, Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Royal Roads University, and at Douglas College in the Criminology Program. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”. He is currently a Doctorate Candidate at the London Metropolitan University in London, England.


(10) “Modern Policing - Under Fire: The Fall of Rome: The end of law enforcement as we know it?”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.             

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gangs and Mental Health; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            Arguably, modern law enforcement is under attack and potentially facing extinction, as we know it. Sociological trends such as Black Lives Matter, viral videos, the Ferguson Effect, the “thin blue line” administrative philosophies combined with preliminary hard data about dwindling enrollment, low morale, scapegoating and politician “policing” are setting the stage for the fall of modern policing. The fall of Rome was largely attributed to systemic factors that are largely mimicked by our present political culture. Could this spell the demise of modern policing? This presentation intends to explore the psychological and sociological risk fac tors for policing as we know it.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.

 

(11) “Working to Instill a Change of Heart in Gang-Involved Youths”, by Terrance L. Stone, Founder/President of Young Visionaries Youth Leadership Academy, San Bernardino, CA.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

            Abstract

            This session will explain what’s in the heart of a gang member by examining the five stages of gang banging: 1. fascination, 2. infatuation, 3. dedication, 4. separation, and the 5. exit strategy. Attendees will better understand why youth at risk find gang life fascinating, and how it becomes a fatal attraction. In this course, the instructor will analyze the gang member early in his/her gang career, what it is in the gang life that infatuates them and motivates them to make a commitment to gang life. For persons having contact with gang involved youth, you will learn how to plant the seeds for having them separate from the gang. Attend this session to explore exit strategies to detour at risk youth from street gangs. Participants in this course will also learn methods used by the instructor in his program for working with at-risk and gang-involved youth. Participants will better understand motives and triggers of gang-involved youth, phone codes and modern lingo used by gang-involved youth.

            Bio

            Terrance graduated from California State University, Los Angeles, with a credential as a State Certified Gang Intervention Specialist. He serves on several committees which include the Sand Bernadino County Sheriff’s Citizen Advisory, the San Bernardino City Chief of Police African American Advisory Committee, Executive Board Member and Chair of the San Bernardino Countywide Gangs and Drugs Task Force, past board member of the African American Chamber of Commerce, and the San Bernardino NAACP chapter. He was selected by former Mayor of San Bernardino, Pat Morris, to join his office on the California Cities Gang Prevention Network. He is committed to steering young people away from gangs. While his main program office is in San Bernardino, his program has developed offices in Atlanta, Georgia, and Phoenix, Arizona, along with Houston, Texas and Denver, Colorado.


(12) “Tactical Interviewing: Interviewing the Criminal Mind”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. 

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Traditional interviewing and communication protocols are commonly successful with those who do not frequent criminal circles. However, when dealing with “experienced criminal gangsters,” they are well prepared to elude even the best interviewer/interrogator. Whether you are a mental health professional, an educator, intelligence analyst, or a law enforcement officer, being up-to-date on how to conduct an interview with the most savvy of criminally minded is the most essential tool.

            This seminar is intended to explore the concept of Tactical Interviewing (TI). TI is a concept being developed and researched by the National Gang Crime Research Center to better aide those who deal directly with the criminally savvy gangster. Tactical Interviewing involves an exploration in Forensic Psychology, Criminal Profiling, and Lie Detection that are combined to illustrate the taxonomies most commonly seen of a liar. With a better understanding of how the criminal mind works and how they develop their lies, you are better equipped to confront them successfully and more productively.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(13) “Lake County’s Approach to Our Regions Opiate Epidemic: Attack Supply AND

Demand”, by Michael G. Nerheim, Lake County State’s Attorney, Waukegan, IL.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract 

            Lake County, Illinois, like most of the rest of the nation, is experiencing an opiate epidemic. The traditional law enforcement approach to illegal drugs focused on attacking the supply of illegal drugs. Through aggressive investigation and prosecution of drug traffickers, coupled with a community-wide collaborative approach which focuses on treatment and harm reduction, Lake County is attempting to fight this crisis by simultaneously attacking supply and demand.

            Bio

            Lake County State’s Attorney Michael G. Nerheim has extensive experience working in all criminal divisions of the Lake County State’s Attorney’s Office. As a former assistant state’s attorney and now as the Lake County State’s Attorney, his experience includes areas of complex litigation, criminal defense and municipal law. Michael G. Nerheim demonstrates strong leadership and business experience, and is heavily involved in the Lake County community.


(14) “Veterans Issues for Law Enforcement”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.         

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gangs and Mental Health; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Dealing With Military Trained Gang Members.

            Abstract

            Veterans issues have been in the news since WWII Veterans returned home, isolated themselves and some formed the basis for Outlaw Motorcycle Clubs/Gangs. Today, those who were called to serve, answer the call in Law Enforcement and many other noble careers. Some, however suffer the toils of war and combat until death. Few, turn to criminal activity. Being well trained and well armed poses inherent risks to an unwitting and ill-prepared community. Adding to this, issues such as TBI and PTSD, complicate matters further. This presentation is designed to prepare law enforcement and the community with awareness of Veterans issues that may affect us all in some way. With current models of Crisis Intervention Teams, this presentation will expose attendees to a variety of issues, concerns, and answers.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(15) “The Global Growth of Nationalism”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            One and one-half (1.5) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification; Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            Headline: “White nationalism on the rise in the United States!” That’s only a fraction of the whole story. Gang specialists need to attend this session to learn what is happening with regard to nationalism on a worldwide scale. The instructor describes the global expansion of nationalistic pride and its affect on various countries’ politics, economies, and peoples on every continent. Maps, pictures, and videos are used to demonstrate the extent of the problem and how it is reaching into the daily lives of citizens, formal political parties and their agendas, as well as street gangs and hate/extremist groups. The definitional distinction is clarified between nationalism, socialism, national socialism, communism, and fascism.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University as a professor in the Department of Criminal Justice. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.


(16) “Introduction to Gangs and Deviant Groups”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Note: This course will be taught only on Monday, August 7th.

            Session Credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract 

            Considering everything from a fraternity to a church group, it is better to be in than out. Animals and human beings alike are social and influenced by group norms, values, and activities. From the outside looking in, mainstream America frequently questions why our youth are drawn to gangs and criminal behavior.

            This presentation is designed to develop a fundamental knowledge of the origins, development, and continued prosperity of gangs and deviant subcultures. Attendees will receive a broad overview of the major gang influences in today’s culture and why gangs, despite our best efforts, continue to adapt and evolve while maintaining surprising influences on our youth and adults. This introduction to gangs will serve as a foundation of knowledge upon which additional presentations at the National Gang Crime Research Center will expand.

Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(17) “Share What You’ve Learned with Other Professionals”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            One and one-half (1.5) hours

            Session credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            This session reviews what is needed and how to do it in order to share your knowledge of gangs and experiences with other professionals. The basics are covered: identifying a topic and forming questions, layout and content, and citing sources. The goal is to encourage Gang College 2018 attendees to compose either a professional manuscript or a “gang news” story and thereby gain a publication citation of their own. Attendees will learn how to develop and submit a professional article for submission for publication consideration to the NGCRC’s Journal of Gang Research, or if desired, to compose a shorter manuscript for submission to the NGCRC’s The Gang Specialist newsletter. In-class discussion is used to stimulate ideas for articles (e.g., best practices, overcoming worst-case scenarios, new approaches to old problems, etc).

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University as a professor in the Department of Criminal Justice. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.


(18) “Critical Incident Management and the First Responder”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            11:21 A.M. April 20, 1999. Two teenagers, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris, open fire at Columbine High School. If you were the first person to be faced with this crisis, what would you do? With all of the historical and current crises facing the world, can you honestly say that you feel prepared to be the first responder?

            This presentation is targeted at anyone interested in learning what to do in the initial phase of a crisis. Why is this important? In 95% of all emergencies, bystanders or victims themselves are the first to arrive at the scene of a crisis. Therefore, it is essential that the responder be knowledgeable about common questions, dilemmas, and demands that may be asked of him or her. This knowledge, along with specific techniques for successful crisis negotiation and an awareness of exactly what should be avoided in a crisis, can save lives. These concepts and more will be addressed in this interactive and practical presentation. The overarching goal of this seminar is to teach any individual how to be a successful first responder to a crisis and ultimately help to prevent tragedies such as Columbine, which resulted tragically in the death of twelve students and one teacher before the gunmen took their own lives.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(19) “Gang Mapping 101: An Introduction ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            This class is part 1 of a 3 part series. It serves as a starting point for understanding crime analysis, specifically, analytical mapping techniques as applied to gangs. Topics covered in this class: the evolution of crime analysis and mapping from the 1800s to present; intelligence levels, divisions, and processes; and the roles and responsibilities of analysts, administrators, and police officers. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.


(20) “The Veterans Reception: For Vets Only”, by Dr. Todd Negola, NGCRC Staff; Fred Moreno, Investigator, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL; and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN..

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Investigation Skills; Gangs and Mental Health..

            Note on scheduling: This will be held on Tuesday, August 8th, after the Law Enforcement/Corrections Reception.

            Abstract

            This is a special reception for vets only. It is held after the “Law Enforcement and Corrections” reception. The purpose is to express appreciation to veterans for their service in the defense of freedom. If you are a vet, come and attend, find a warm, friendly environment. Door prizes. Great chances to network and mingle. Learn something new, meet somebody new. Sponsored by the NGCRC staff, you will feel appreciated here.

Bios

            These men are long time staff of the NGCRC, and are well known for their gang expertise. Todd is also a psychologist whose practice is with vets through the VA. Fred is an investigator with the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. Lee is a vet who still fits into his issued uniform and teaches gang mapping technology, among other topics.


(21) “Introduction to Separatist, Racist and Extremist Groups (SREG’s)”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research, and James A. Anderson, M.S., Minnesota Deputy State Fire Marshall, Fire Inspector.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Group/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Abstract

            This session is an introduction to the various Separatist, Racist, and Extremist Groups (SREGs) in the United States today. The instructors review the founders, origins, beliefs, practices, past and current activities, and significant symbology (e.g., phrases, graffiti, and dates). Call them “Hate Groups” is too simplistic and does not capture the complexity of the problem. The instructors discuss groups that are based on religious belief, political ideology, or racial views.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University as a professor in the Department of Criminal Justice. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.

            James A. Anderson is a Deputy State Fire Marshal in Minnesota and a State Fire Inspector. He is a fire science instructor with the Fire and Emergency Education Department at Saint Cloud Technical College. He has participated as an evaluator in numerous state level fire service certification board examinations throughout the State of Minnesota. James has presented and taught at several Minnesota state fire school conferences. James is a second generation firefighter and has been an active member in the fire service since 1993 as both civilian and military (8 years active duty Air Force Firefighter). Along with years of firefighting experience he has obtained both his M.S. and B.A. in Criminal Justice from Saint Cloud State University and an A.A.S. in Fire Science from the Community College of the Air Force, all of which have an emphasis on forensic fire science and arson investigation. James was awarded the Arnold Sibet Award for Outstanding service to the Crystal Fire Department and was awarded the Air Force’s Outstanding Unit Award with Valor while serving as a firefighter during his first deployment for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Recently James was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for the year 2012 for Superior Research.


(22) “Training for Trainers: The Development of Your Own Gang Presentation”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising.

            Abstract

            Have you ever wished to stand center stage and conduct a gang presentation or training? Friends, colleagues, community agencies, and collaborating agencies will ask for your opinion and expertise about gang and crime-related issues as a result of your attendance at the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Annual Conference. This program is aimed to assist you in sharing this knowledge by preparing you to create and deliver your very own gang training.

            A central mission of the National Gang Crime Research Center is to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge, research, and awareness to interested parties and to develop collegial networks. This training is designed to help the audience prepare and deliver a responsible and professional message in a meaningful and impacting manner. This presentation will explore the fundamental concepts of subject matter expertise, research outlets, outline development, use of technology to deliver a message, ethical and professional responsibilities, maintaining an audience’s attention, and incorporating feedback into future presentations.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 18 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.

            

(23) “Gang Presence in Social Media: Data Mining Twitter, Facebook, and Other Social Media Outlets”, by Dr. John Jacob Rodriguez, Associate Professor, Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX.

            One hour and Thirty Minutes (1.5 hour)

            Session credits: Gang Internet Investigation; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and the Mass Media.

            Abstract

            This session is a qualitative exploration of data mining social media. It will explore content bites from “Twitter”, “Facebook”, and other outlets to determine the existence and prevalence of gangs on social media. The session will focus mostly on Twitter because of its unique feature of the tweet. The tweet is a 140 character message which can be shared with other Twitter users throughout the world. A qualitative content analysis will be employed to observe multiple tweets which may have global implications for law enforcement, military, and intelligence agencies.

            Bio

            Dr. Rodriguez is an associate professor at the University of Texas at Arlington in the Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice. He has been studying, researching, and writing on gang activity for over 16 years. He has published and presented much of his work in the U.S. and abroad. He has also consulted and testified as an expert witness in multiple cases including but not limited deportation of gang members, organized crime, and various homicide cases.


(24) “Gang Mapping 201: Theory and Praxis ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            This class is part 2 of a 3 part series. Participants learn about criminological research and theories that established the practical application of crime mapping and profiling. Three profiling models will be expounded: psychological profiling, geographic offender profiling, and spatio-temporal crime profiling. Methodological, ethical, and legal issues associated with the use of crime mapping will also be discussed. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.


(25) “Gang Mapping 301: Modeling and Mapping ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists. 

            Abstract

            This class is part 3 of a 3 part series. The instructors identify and define key terms and concepts used by crime analysts to accomplish their work. They then present and explain examples o0f how they convey their findings: standard types and levels of maps, standard crime patterns and profiles, and analytical models. The class closes with practical hands-on exercises in reading and interpreting various maps. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.


 

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CHARGE IT:

In response to numerous requests, the NGCRC now takes all major credit cards, defined specifically as the "big four": Visa, Master Card, Discover Card, and American Express. Fill out the registration form, and fax it to the NGCRC: the fax number for the NGCRC is (708) 258-9546

A registration form appears below:

 



THE 2018 NGCRC's 21st INTERNATIONAL

GANG SPECIALIST TRAINING PROGRAM


REGISTRATION FORM:  December 31, 2017

on-Line Version


Please PRINT neatly or type your full name with any title that you want to appear in your official name badge for the conference.


I.D. Badge Information:


NAME:___________________________________________


Title:_____________________________________________


Agency:__________________________________________


City,State:________________________________________




MAIL AND CONTACT INFORMATION: Where we will mail you a Confirmation of Registration letter for the conference, and fax the same material to you:


Name:___________________________________________________________


Agency :__________________________________________________________


Street Address:____________________________________________________


City, State, Zip:____________________________________________________


Tel. #. Area Code_______ Tel #:____________________


Fax #. Area Code_______ Fax #:____________________

 

Email Address:____________________________________



The NGCRC reserves the right to refuse service to anyone: Towards this end we must ask that all persons registering for the conference sign and by their signature acknowledge the Official Policy of the NGCRC which is as follows - In order to provide the safest and most educational environment, the National Gang Crime Research Center (NGCRC) works to ensure that all participants at our conference are law-abiding individuals who have gathered to collect and share information about gangs and crime, in order to reduce and possibly eliminate the problems associated with gang activity. Therefore, it is our policy that no individuals or groups will be permitted at our conference who have links to gangs or other aberrant groups and no one will be permitted to provoke or distract our participants from the most meaningful learning environment. The National Gang Crime Research Center (NGCRC) reserves the right to refuse attendance to any person or persons suspected of or actually displaying gang affiliations. Furthermore, we reserve the right to refuse attendance to any individual(s) determined to be disruptive or instigating a negative or inappropriate presence or who is determined to disrupt the sharing of information in the most effective learning environment. I have also read and understand the refund policy published by the NGCRC. I attest that I am at least 18 years of age as of this date.


I hereby acknowledge by my signature the above policies of the NGCRC:_________________________________________________________________________________________________


I would like to attend the Christian Gang Specialist Reception ___Yes ___No (if blank, we assume you mean "NO")


I work in either law enforcement or corrections and I would like to attend the Law Enforcement and Corrections Networking Reception: ____Yes ____No (if blank, we assume you mean "NO")


I want to attend the Intervention/Prevention/Counseling Gang Specialist Networking Reception ____Yes ____No (if blank, we assume you mean "NO")

 

I am registering for (check appropriate box):


___Certification ___Non-Certification ___One Day Pass (pick which day: ___Monday ___Tuesday ___Wednesday)


I have previously completed certification training by the NGCRC. ____Yes ____No

If registering for Certification, Complete this section ONLY if you have previously been Certified by the National Gang Crime Research Center at any of the previous NGCRC International Gang Specialist Training Conference(s). I received NGCRC certification from (check one or more as may apply in your situation):

___First International ___Second International ___Third International ___Fourth International ___Fifth International ___Sixth International ___Seventh International ___Eighth International ____Ninth International ____Tenth International ___Eleventh International ___Twelfth International   ___Thirteenth International ___Fourteenth International   ___Fifteenth International ____Sixteenth International ____Seventeenth International ____Eighteenth International ____Nineteenth International ____Twentieth International

SPECIAL TRAINING TRACKS (If you are registering for Certification, you also need to complete this section): SELECT ONE ONLY (this is for your second certificate): I am signing up for Track Number ________ entitled ________________________________________________


(1) Gang Crime Investigation Skills Track

(2) Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole Track

(3) Gang Homicide Investigation Skills Track

(4) Gangs and Drugs Track

(5) Gang Problems in K-12 Schools Track

(6) Gangs and Organized Crime

(7) Gangs and Mental Health Track

(8) Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills Track

(9) Gang Internet Investigation

(10) Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services Track

(11) Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills Track

(12) Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists

(13) Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence Track

(14) Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills Track

(15) Motorcycle Gangs (restricted: for Criminal Justice Personnel only)

(16) Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities

(17) Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators

(18) Gang Counseling Skills Track

(19) Advanced Gang Identification

(20) Gang Profile Analysis Track

(21) Gang Prosecution Track

(22) Gang Prevention Skills Track

(23) International and Transnational Gang Problems Track

(24) Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs Track

(25) Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs Track

(26) Female Gangs/Female Gang Members.Track

(27) Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising Skills Track

(28) Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping Track

(29) Gangs and the Mass Media Track

(30) Graffiti Identification and Analysis

(31) Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention Track

(32) Dealing With Military Trained Gang Members

 

Your registration fee does not cover your hotel room or transportantion or parking or meals. Your registration fee covers only the training itself.


Amount to pay for Registration (see schedule below):

 

ADVANCE REGISTRATION PERIOD:

Paying on or before December 31, 2017: Non-Certification $450, Certificatin $500

 

EARLY REGISTRATION PERIODS:

Paying on or after January 1, 2018 and on or before January 31, 2018: Non-Certification $500, Certification $550

Paying on or after February 1, 2018 and on or before February 28, 2018: Non-Certification $550, Certification $600

Paying on or after March 1, 2018 and on or before March 31, 2018: Non-Certification $600, Certification $650

 

REGULAR REGISTRATION PERIODS:

Paying on or after April 1, 2018 and on or before April 30, 2018: Non-Certification $650, Certification $700

Paying on or after May 1, 2018 and on or before May 31, 2018: Non-Certification $700, Certification $750

Paying on or after June 1, 2018 and on or before June 30, 2018: Non-Certification $750, Certification $800

Paying on or after July 1, 2018 and on or before July 31, 2018: Non-Certification $800, Certification $850

 

LATE REGISTRATION PERIOD:

Paying on or after August 1, 2018 and on or before August 4th, 2018: Non-Certification, $900, Certification $950

 

ONSITE REGISTRATION: An Onsite Registration is any registration made on or after August 5, 2018.

Paying On-Site (If slots are available): Non-Certification $950, Certification $1000

 

Price for the One-Day Pass: $395 per day.

You need to specify which day: ___Monday ___Tuesday ___Wednesday

 

I am signing up for the Double Major option (where I get two certificates in the two different specialty areas, it requires me to log-in at least four hours in each track or specialty area, and I have enclosed an extra $90 for this option). ____Yes ____No

If yes regarding the Double Major, my second training track will be: (fill it in here)______________________________________________________________

 

Note anyone registering on-site: we reserve the right to refuse on-site registration to anyone for any reason. You will need USC, money order, traveler’s checks, bank check, cashier's check, or government agency check to pay onsite.


Note: you know you are registered for the conference if and only if you receive from the NGCRC an official “Conference Registration Confirmation” letter; we send these out PROMPTLY to all persons; so if you have not received one, you are not registered.


NOTE: Payment must be received by the NGCRC prior to the conference itself unless the NGCRC agrees to the terms of any alternative arrangement (in writing)..


Group Discount Code:_____________


PAYMENT METHOD: We prefer checks or money orders for payment. No personal checks will be accepted for on-site payment of conference registration fees. We do accept credit card payments.

_____Payment enclosed in check or money order made payable to "National Gang Crime Research Center"

_____VISA, MasterCard, American Express or Discover (Circle one).

Card number:________________________________________________________________________________

Expiration date: Month___________________________ Year:_______________________ CVC# On card:______

Name on card: (printed):___________________________________________________________________

Telephone of card holder in case we need to call:_________________________________________________

Your Signature:________________________________ Amount you authorize to charge (total):__$______________

Billing Address for the card holder(Printed): (street address)__________________________________________________________
Zip Code for the Billing Address:__________________________________

 

Call (708) 258-9111 if you need the NGCRC F.E.I.N. (tax number) or our Merchant Number for credit card payments. Also, call (708) 258-9111 if you want to provide credit card info by verbal rather than written transmission.

Registration forms can be faxed to the NGCRC, the Fax Number is (708) 258-9546.

Registration forms can be emailed to the NGCRC, the email address is: gangcrime@aol.com

(you can always elect to "call in" the credit card number if you are paying by credit card).

 

Make checks or money orders payable to "National Gang Crime Research Center". Make sure to mail a copy of your registration with the payment so that proper credit can be made to your registration. Send registration forms and payment to: The 2018 Conference Processing Center, National Gang Crime Research Center, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990.